Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Byzantine CoinsView Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Coins

Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to the former Byzantium in Thrace and renamed it Constantinopolis, present day Istanbul, Turkey. Numismatists, for convenience, have arbitrarily categorized coins from Anastasius I and after as Byzantine coins. Numismatists use Anastasius as the beginning of Byzantine because he dramatically reformed the bronze coinage. A significant minority of numismatists pick an earlier time and ruler, often Constantine the Great, as the dividing time between the Roman and Byzantine empires, because most coins were issued from Constantinople, or since it became the seat of government. Although the citizens generally spoke Greek, they considered themselves Roman for the entire Byzantine period, making our division of the empire an entirely modern convention.


Byzantine Empire, Isaac I Comnenus, 1 September 1057 - 22 November 1059

Click for a larger photo
Isaac I Komnenos was the founder of the Komnenian dynasty. Orphaned at an early age, he was raised under the care of Emperor Basil II. He made his name as a successful military commander. In 1057 he led a conspiracy of dissatisfied generals against the newly crowned Michael VI. He was proclaimed emperor by his followers and defeated the loyalist army in battle. On 1 Sep 1057, Isaac was crowned in the Hagia Sophia. To strengthen the Empire's fiscal condition he reduced salaries, implemented harsh tax measures and confiscated Church properties. This aroused much opposition particularly, from the Patriarch of Constantinople, whom he had arrested and exiled but who died before he was put on trial. The eastern frontier held firm during his reign, Hungarian raids were resolved by a treaty, and the restive Pechenegs were subdued by Isaac in person in summer 1059. Soon after, he fell ill and abdicated his throne in favor of Constantine X Doukas. Isaac retired to a monastery where he died in 1060.
SH87502. Gold histamenon nomisma, DOC III-2 2; Morrison BnF 50/Cp/AV/01; Wroth BMC p. 512, 3; Ratto 2007; Sommer 51.1; SBCV 1843, gVF/XF, well centered and struck, weight 4.400 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 1 Sep 1057 - 22 Nov 1059; obverse +IhS XIS REX REGNANTIhm (Jesus Christ King of Kings), Christ enthroned facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, gospels in left hand, double border; reverse +ICAAKIOC RA CIΛEVC PωM (Isaac King of the Romans), Issac standing facing, bearded; wearing crown with cross and pendilia, and military attire: cuirass, tunic, cloak and high boots; sword over his right shoulder in his right hand, resting left hand on scabbard hung on his side; from the Robert Watcher Collection, ex iNumis auction 6 (11 Oct 2008), lot 426; scarce; $1400.00 (1190.00)


Byzantine Empire, Philippicus Bardanes, 4 November 711 - June 713 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Philippicus Bardanes was from a prominent Armenian family in Pergamum and a general of the Opsikion Theme army under Justinian II. While Justinian II ruled in a bloodthirsty frenzy of revenge, the Bulgars ravaged the empire right up to the city walls. Bardanes arrived at Constantinople with the army. But, instead of fighting the Bulgars he seized the throne. An ineffective ruler, Philippicus engaged in destructive internal religious disputes while the external threats grew and Bulgars and Arabs continued to raid Byzantine territory. In less than two years, he was deposed in a coup, blinded and exiled to a monastery.
BZ82676. Bronze follis, Anastasi 374, SBCV 1460A, Hahn MIB 24, DOC II-2, -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, Morrisson BnF -, F, ragged flan, weight 3.824 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 4 Nov 711 - Jun 713 A.D.; obverse Philippicus standing facing, wearing helmet and military attire, eagle-tipped scepter in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse large M flanked by two stars, monogram above, SCL in exergue; very rare; $950.00 (807.50)


Byzantine Empire, Revolt of the Heraclii, 608 - 5 Oct 610 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Heraclius the Elder, possibly of Armenian origin, was a Byzantine general and the father of Byzantine emperor Heraclius. He distinguished himself in the war against the Sassanid Persians in the 580s, was a subordinate general under Philippicus during the Battle of Solachon, and possibly served under Comentiolus during the Battle of Sisarbanon. About 595, Heraclius the Elder is mentioned as a magister militum per Armeniam sent by Emperor Maurice to quell an Armenian rebellion led by Samuel Vahewuni and Atat Khorkhoruni. About 600, he was appointed as the Exarch of Africa and in 608, Heraclius the Elder rebelled with his son against the usurper Phocas. Using North Africa as a base, the younger Heraclius managed to overthrow Phocas, beginning the Heraclian dynasty, which would rule Byzantium for a century. Heraclius the Elder died soon after receiving news of his son's accession to the Byzantine throne.
BZ86356. Bronze follis, DOC II-2 16, Morrison BnF 9/Ax/AE/01, Hahn MIBEC 16a, Grierson 164, Tolstoi 279, SBCV 722, Sommer -, Ratto -, VF, rev. a little off center cutting off part of mintmark, scratches, overstruck, weight 11.035 g, maximum diameter 30.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Alexandria or Alexandretta mint, Sep - Oct 610 A.D.; obverse dm N ERACLIO CONSULII, facing busts of Heraclius and his father, both bearded, bareheaded and wearing consular robes, cross above center; reverse large M (40 nummi), cross above, ANNO left, X/IIII (year 14) on right, A (1st officina) below, AΛEZAN∆ in exergue; rare; $760.00 (646.00)


Byzantine Empire, Tiberius III Apsimar, Late 698 - Summer 705

Click for a larger photo
After the loss of Carthage to the Arabs in 698 the disgruntled Byzantine forces declared Apsimar emperor and laid siege to Constantinople. The emperor Leontius, who had only recently taken the throne from Justinian II, was easily defeated and Aspimar took the throne with the name Tiberius. Tiberius mutilated Leontius' nose and imprisoned him, just as Leontius had done to Justinian II. In 705, Justinian II returned to Constantinople with an army of Bulgars and Slavs. He gained entrance to the city by climbing through an aqueduct pipe and with the advantage of surprise regained his throne. Both Leontius and Tiberius were dragged through the streets in chains and beheaded.
SH87501. Gold solidus, DOC II-2 1b, Morrisson BnF 17/Cp/AV/01, Wroth BMC p. 346, 2, Tolstoi 2, Hahn MIB 1, Sommer 16.1, SBCV 1360, Berk 193, Ratto -, gVF+, severe double strike, weight 4.405 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, late 698 - summer 705; obverse D TIbERIVS PE AV, Crowned and cuirassed bust facing with short beard, holding spear diagonally across his body and a shield, shield decorated with rider; reverse VICTORIA AVSY B (victory of the Emperor, 2nd officina), Cross potent on four steps, CONOB in exergue; ex Harlan J. Berk; $700.00 (595.00)


Byzantine Empire, Revolt of the Heraclii, 608 - 5 Oct 610 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Heraclius the Elder, possibly of Armenian origin, was a Byzantine general and the father of Byzantine emperor Heraclius. He distinguished himself in the war against the Sassanid Persians in the 580s, was a subordinate general under Philippicus during the Battle of Solachon, and possibly served under Comentiolus during the Battle of Sisarbanon. About 595, Heraclius the Elder is mentioned as a magister militum per Armeniam sent by Emperor Maurice to quell an Armenian rebellion led by Samuel Vahewuni and Atat Khorkhoruni. About 600, he was appointed as the Exarch of Africa and in 608, Heraclius the Elder rebelled with his son against the usurper Phocas. Using North Africa as a base, the younger Heraclius managed to overthrow Phocas, beginning the Heraclian dynasty, which would rule Byzantium for a century. Heraclius the Elder died soon after receiving news of his son's accession to the Byzantine throne.
BZ86357. Bronze follis, DOC II 16, Morrison BnF 9/Ax/AE/02, Hahn MIBEC 16a, Grierson 164, Tolstoi 279, SBCV 722, Sommer -, Ratto -, aF, uneven strike, a little off center, scratches, overstruck, edge cracks, weight 5.587 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Alexandria or Alexandretta mint, Sep - Oct 610 A.D.; obverse dm N ERACLIO CONSULII, facing busts of Heraclius and his father, both bearded, bareheaded and wearing consular robes, cross above center; reverse Large M (40 nummi), cross above, ANNO left, X/IIII (year 14) on right, A (1st officina) below, AΛEZAN∆ in exergue; rare; $450.00 (382.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This is a new ornaments variety, unlisted by Bellinger and Grierson, with one pellet in each limb of the nimbus cross, two pellets vertically arranged within a jeweled border on the Gospels and the ornamentation shown below both above and under the reverse inscription. We have designated this new variety Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments F1d.

SH82730. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments F1d, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, porosity, edge crack, weight 9.903 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 150o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing nimbate bust of Christ, two pellets in each arm of the cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below inscription; unpublished variety; $450.00 (382.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This is a new ornaments variety, unlisted by Bellinger and Grierson, with one pellet in each limb of the nimbus cross, two pellets vertically arranged within a jeweled border on the Gospels and the ornamentation shown below both above and under the reverse inscription. We have designated this new variety Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments F1d.

SH82732. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments F1d, EF, well centered, obverse legend unstruck, light corrosion and deposits, weight 9.297 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing nimbate bust of Christ, two pellets in each arm of the cross, pallium, and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornaments above and below inscription; unpublished variety; $450.00 (382.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
SH82754. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 24a, EF, much mint luster, areas with porosity and light encrustation, weight 10.950 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, gospels ornamented with two pellets within a jeweled border, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below inscription; $450.00 (382.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
SH82755. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 24a, EF, some mint luster, areas of porosity, obverse legend weak, weight 11.982 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, gospels ornamented with two pellets within a jeweled border, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below inscription; $450.00 (382.50)


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
SH82756. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ, class A3; SBCV 1818; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 24a, EF, sharp portrait, obverse legend unstruck, porosity, reverse slightly off center, weight 11.708 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium, and colobium, holding gospels with both hands, gospels ornamented with two pellets within a jeweled border, to left IC, to right XC; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), ornamentation above and below inscription; $450.00 (382.50)




  






REFERENCES

Adelson, H. Light Weight Solidi and Byzantine Trade during the Sixth and Seventh Centuries. ANSNNM 138. (New York, 1957).
Anastasi, M. Monete Bizantine di Sicilia. (NP, 2009).
Bellinger, A.R. & P. Grierson, eds. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection. (Washington D.C., 1966 - 1999).
Bendall, S. A Private Collection of Palaeologan Coinage. (Wolverhampton, Privately printed by S. Bendall, 1988).
Bendall, S. & P.J. Donald. The Billon Trachea of Michael VIII Palaeologos, 1258-1282. (London, 1974).
Bendall, S. & P.J. Donald. Later Palaeologan Coinage, 1282-1453. (London, 1979).
Berk, H.J. Eastern Roman Successors of the Sestertius. (Chicago, 1987).
Berk, H.J. Roman Gold Coins of the Medieval World, 383 - 1453 A.D. (Joliet, IL, 1986).
Berk, H.J & V. England. Byzantine Coins, Public Auction, December 7, 1989, New York.
Calciati, R. Monete Bizantine di Bronzo della Sicilia. (Cairo, 2000).
Foss, C. Arab-Byzantine Coins: An Introduction, with a Catalogue of the Dumbarton Oaks Collection. (Harvard, 2008).
Feg, F. Corpus of the Nomismata from Anastasius II to John I in Constantinople, 713 - 976. (2007).
Goodwin, Tony. Arab-Byzantine Coinage. Studies in the Khalili Collection. (London, 2005).
Grierson, Philip & Mark Blackburn. Medieval European Coinage, Volume 1: The Early Middle Ages (5th - 10th Centuries). (Cambridge, 2007).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Hahn, W. & M.A. Metlich. Money of the Incipient Byzantine Empire. (Vienna, 2000).
Hahn, W. & M.A. Metlich. Money of the Incipient Byzantine Empire Continued (Justin II - Revolt of the Heraclii, 565 - 610). (Vienna, 2009).
Lacam, G. La fin de L'Empire Romain et le monnayage or en Italie. (Lucern, 1983).
Marchev, V. & R. Wachter. Catalogue of the Late Byzantine coins, Vol. I, 1082 - 1261 AD. (Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria, 2011).
Metlich, M. A. The Coinage of Ostrogothic Italy. (London, 2004).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothque Nationale. (Paris, 1970).
Ranieri, E. La monetazione di Ravenna antica dal V all' VIII secolo: impero romano e bizantino, regno ostrogoto e langobardo. (Bologna, 2006).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines l'poque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Retowski, O. Die Mnzen der Komnenen von Trapezunt. (Coins of the Comnenus Family of Trebizond.) (Braunschweig, 1974).
Sear, D.R. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Sommer, A.U. Die Mnzen des Byzantinischen Reiches 491-1453. Mit einem Anhang: Die Mnzen des Kaiserreichs von Trapezunt. (Regenstauf, 2010).
Sotheby's. The William Herbert Hunt collection. Highly important Byzantine coins, I & II, New York, 1990-1991.
Spahr, R. Le Monete Siciliane, dai Bizantini a Carlo I d' Angio (582 - 1282). (Graz, 1976).
Spahr, R. Le Monete Siciliane dagli Aragonesi ai Borboni (1282 - 1836). (Basel/Graz, 1982).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 1914).
Tomasini, W.J. The Barbaric Tremissis in Spain and Southern France - Anastasius to Leovigild. ANSNNM 152 (New York, 1964).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).
Yannopoulos, P.A. L' hexagramme: un monnayage byzantin en argent du VIIe sicle. (Louvain-la-Neuve, 1978).


Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 21, 2018.
Page created in 0.86 seconds.
Byzantine Coins