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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |after 50 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Republic after 50 B.C.
Roman Republic, Lead Glans Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Lead| |Glans| |Sling-Bullet,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|, NEW
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AS96122. Lead glans, cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23, roughly almond shaped, 71.5g, 39mm long, no inscription or markings, $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $24.50


Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 86 and 94, Gasvoda Collection, Oct 2015 and 2016

|after| |50| |B.C.|, |Numismatica| |ARS| |Classica| |Auction| |86| |and| |94,| |Gasvoda| |Collection,| |Oct| |2015| |and| |2016|,
The Gasvoda Collection Part 1, 8 October 2015, and Part 2, 6 October 2016. Coins of the Imperatorial Period and the Twelve Caesars.
BC15802. Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 86 and 94, The Gasvoda Collection Part 1, 8 Oct 2015, and Part 2, 6 Oct 2016, 2 auctions, 2 catalogs, softcover, 87 pages, 382 lots, illustrated, good condition, only one copy available, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $18.00 SALE |PRICE| $9.00
 


Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, L. Hostilius Saserna, 48 B.C.

|after| |50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Dictatorship| |of| |Julius| |Caesar,| |L.| |Hostilius| |Saserna,| |48| |B.C.|, |denarius|
A very popular type that may depict the Gallic chieftain Vercingetorix. Vercingetorix had surrendered to Caesar three years earlier and was a prisoner in the Tullianum at Rome when this coin was minted. He was publicly beheaded as part of Caesar's triumph in 46 B.C.
SH18013. Silver denarius, SRCV I 418, Crawford 448/2a, RSC I Hostilia 2, Sydenham 952, Choice VF, weight 3.802 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 48 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Gallic captive (Vercingetorix?) right, Gallic shield behind; reverse L HOSTILIVS SASERN, Gallic warrior and charioteer in galloping biga right; scarce; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Albert, R. Die Münzen der römischen Republik. (Regenstauf, 2003).
Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
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Berger, F. Die Münzen der Römischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
Buttrey, T. "The Denarii of P. Crepusius and Roman Republican Mint Organization" in ANSMN 21 (1976), p. 67-108.
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic Online - http://numismatics.org/chrr/
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006) pp. 321-356.
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
De Ruyter, P. "Denarii of the Roman Republican Moneyer Lucius Julius Bursio, a Die Analysis" in NC 156 (1996), p. 79 - 121, pl. 21 - 22.
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 63 BC - 49 BC. (London, 1995).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 81 BCE - 64 BCE. (Citrus Heights, CA, 2012).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

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