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Ancient Coins Featuring Arms and Armor
Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||aureus|NEW
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SL110372. Gold aureus, RIC II-1 1; BMCRE I 31; SRCV I 2252, Cohen 1 225, Hunter I 16, NGC F 5/5 - 3/5 (5771211-001), weight 7.13 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse Jewess captive seated right in attitude of mourning, knees drawn up, head resting on left hand propped up on knees, trophy of captured arms behind her includes helmet, cuirass, oblong and round shields, and greaves, IVDAEA in exergue; first example of this type handled by Forum; NGC| Lookup; $9400.00 SALE PRICE $8460.00 ON RESERVE


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Judaea| |Capta||denarius|
On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date. This type celebrates the victory of Vespasian and Titus. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
SH99749. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 2; Hendin 6509; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; Hunter I 18; SRCV I 2296, gVF, toned, excellent portrait, obverse off center, die wear, edge crack, weight 3.347 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 21 Dec 69 - early 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse Jewess captive seated right in attitude of mourning beside a trophy of captured arms behind her, IVDAEA in exergue; ex Jesus Vico auction 161 (21 Apr 2022), lot 419; $700.00 SALE PRICE $630.00 ON RESERVE


Judaea, Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator Under Claudius and Nero, 52 - 60 A.D.

|Antonius| |Felix|, |Judaea,| |Antonius| |Felix,| |Roman| |Procurator| |Under| |Claudius| |and| |Nero,| |52| |-| |60| |A.D.||prutah|
Minted by Antonius Felix, Roman Procurator of Judaea, 52 - 60 A.D., in the names of Nero and Britannicus Caesars, the stepson and son respectively of the emperor Claudius.
JD98809. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6377; Meshorer TJC 340; Sofaer 59; BMC Palestine p. 264, 21; RPC I 4971, gF, near full legends, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, marks, obv. edge beveled, weight 2.984 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, under Nero, 54 A.D.; obverse NEPW KΛAV KAICAP (Nero Claudius Caesar), two crossed oblong shields with two crossed spears on far side; reverse BPIT (Britannicus), six-branched palm bearing two bunches of dates, L - I∆ / K-AI (year 14 of Caesar) in two divided lines flanking trunk; from an Israeli collection; $140.00 (145.60)


German States, Margraviate of Brandenburg, Friedrich II, 1440 - 1470

|Germany|, |German| |States,| |Margraviate| |of| |Brandenburg,| |Friedrich| |II,| |1440| |-| |1470||Hohlpfennig| |Bracteate|
Frederick II of Brandenburg was a Prince-elector of the Margraviate of Brandenburg from 1440 until his abdication in 1470, and was a member of the House of Hohenzollern.
ME92076. Silver Hohlpfennig Bracteate, Bahrfeldt 16a, Tewes H60c, Saurma 4819, aEF, toned, tiny edge crack, weight 0.274 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Frankfurt (Oder) mint, 1440 - 1470; obverse helmet with crest of six feathers on top, within rayed border; reverse incuse of obverse; ex Mnzenhandlung W. Rittig (Schwelm, Germany); $110.00 (114.40)


Kings of Cappadocia, Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, c. 163 - 130 B.C.

|Cappadocian| |Kingdom|, |Kings| |of| |Cappadocia,| |Ariarathes| |V| |Eusebes| |Philopator,| |c.| |163| |-| |130| |B.C.||AE| |15|
Ariarathes V Eusebes was known for his excellent character and cultivation of philosophy and liberal arts. Some historians name him as the greatest Cappadocian king. He was the son of Ariarathes IV and Antiochis (daughter of the Seleucid King Antiochus III). On the advice of Rome, he rejected marriage with Laodice V, the sister of Demetrius I Soter. Demetrius made war upon Ariarathes, deprived him of his kingdom, and put his brother on the throne. The Romans restored Ariarathes' to his throne. In 154, Ariarathes assisted Attalus II of Pergamon in his war against Prusias II of Bithynia. In 130, Ariarathes was killed while supporting the Romans in their war against Aristonicus of Pergamon. In return for the assistance that cost his life, Rome added Lycaonia and Cilicia to the dominions of his family.
GB99181. Bronze AE 15, Simonetta p. 79, 1a (Ariarathes IV - VII); BMC Galatia p. 43, 4 (Ariarathes X); HGC 7 814 (R2) var. (serrate edge);, F, dark green patina, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 3.745 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, c. 163 - 130 B.C.; obverse zebu (humped bull) standing right; reverse BAΣIΛ APIAPA, bow in gorytos (bow case and quiver); ex CNG e-auction 496 (21 Jul 2021), lot 176; very rare; $100.00 (104.00)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |20|
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB98883. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), gF, weight 6.780 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $90.00 (93.60)


Mesembria, Thrace, 300 - 250 B.C.

|Mesembria|, |Mesembria,| |Thrace,| |300| |-| |250| |B.C.||AE| |22|
The wheel on the reverse is depicted with a degree of perspective, which is unusual on ancient coins.

(sampi) was an archaic Greek letter used between the 7th and the middle of the 5th centuries B.C., probably to denote some type of a sibilant (hissing) ΣΣ or TΣ sound, and was abandoned when the sound disappeared from Greek. The name sampi is of medieval origin. The letter's original name in antiquity is not known. Its use has been attested at the Ionian cities Miletus, Ephesos, Halikarnassos, Erythrae, and Teos, at the Ionian colony of Massalia in Gaul, on the island of Samos, and at Kyzikos, Mysia. At Mesembria, on the Black Sea coast of Thrace, it was used on coins in an abbreviation of the city's name, spelled META. In a famous painted black figure amphora from c. 615 B.C., known as the "Nessos amphora," the inscribed name of the eponymous centaur Nessus is rendered in the irregular spelling NETOΣ.
GB98884. Bronze AE 22, SNG Stancomb 229, SNG Cop 658, SNG BM 276 var. (helmet left), aVF, porous, oval flan, weight 4.457 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, 300 - 250 B.C.; obverse Thracian helmet with cheek guard right; reverse wheel with hub and four spokes, METAM/BPIANΩN (T = archaic Greek letter sampi = ΣΣ) divided, above and below; rare; $90.00 (93.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Diodotus Tryphon, 142 - 138 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Diodotus| |Tryphon,| |142| |-| |138| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Tryphon, a general, betrayed and deposed the child king Antiochus VI and seized power for himself in Coele-Syria. He reinstated Hasmonean rule in Judea in exchange for which Jewish armies under the High Priest Jonathan marched against his rival Demetrius. But Tryphon betrayed Jonathan taking him prisoner at a "friendly" meeting and marching his army to Judaea. Jonathan's brother, Simon Maccabaeus, was ready for battle, preventing invasion. Tryphon promised to free Jonathan in exchange for one hundred talents and Jonathan's two sons as hostages. Simon did not trust Tryphon, but he complied so he could not be accused of his brother's death. As expected, Jonathan was executed.Tryphon committed suicide after he was defeated by Antiochus VII.
GY98894. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2034(2)e, SNG Spaer 1830, Babelon Rois 1052, Houghton CSE 261, HGC 9 1061 (S), VF/F, dark green patina, central cavities, weight 4.842 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 142 - 138 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, diadem ends falling straight behind; reverse spiked Macedonian helmet left, with cheek guards, adorned with a wild goat's horn above the visor, star (control) left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / TPYΦΩNOΣ in two downward lines on the right, AYTOKPATOPOΣ downward on left; $90.00 (93.60)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 105 - 85 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |c.| |105| |-| |85| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. When this coin was struck Amisos was part of the Kingdom of Pontus. The city came under Roman control in 47 B.C. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB99018. Bronze AE 21, SNG Cop 155, SNG Stancomb 680; HGC 7 241; SNG BM 1165 var. (no right side monograms), BMC Pontus p. 17, 50 var. (same), gVF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, flan adjustment marks, tight flan, mild porosity, weight 8.072 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, struck under Mithradates VI, c. 105 - 85 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap, AMI-ΣOY divided across field, star in crescent upper left, IB upper right, lower left, monogram lower right; $90.00 (93.60)


Seleukid Kingdom, Diodotus Tryphon, 142 - 138 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Diodotus| |Tryphon,| |142| |-| |138| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Tryphon, a general, betrayed and deposed the child king Antiochus VI and seized power for himself in Coele-Syria. He reinstated Hasmonean rule in Judea in exchange for which Jewish armies under the High Priest Jonathan marched against his rival Demetrius. But Tryphon betrayed Jonathan taking him prisoner at a "friendly" meeting and marching his army to Judaea. Jonathan's brother, Simon Maccabaeus, was ready for battle, preventing invasion. Tryphon promised to free Jonathan in exchange for one hundred talents and Jonathan's two sons as hostages. Simon did not trust Tryphon, but he complied so he could not be accused of his brother's death. As expected, Jonathan was executed.Tryphon committed suicide after he was defeated by Antiochus VII.
GY98893. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2034(2)a, SNG Spaer 1835, Babelon Rois 1051, HGC 9 1061 (S), aVF, brown patina, central cavities, scattered tiny pitting, weight 5.626 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 142 - 138 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, diadem ends falling straight behind; reverse spiked Macedonian helmet left, with cheek guards, adorned with a wild goat's horn above the visor, aphlaston (control) left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / TPYΦΩNOΣ in two downward lines on the right, AYTOKPATOPOΣ downward on left; $80.00 (83.20)




  



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