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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros| ▸ |Romulus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Romulus

Romulus and Remus are the mythical twin founders of Rome. Their grandfather was Numitor, king of Alba Longa, a descendant of the Trojan Prince Aeneas and father to their mother, Rhea Silvia. Numitor's brother Amulius deposed him, killed his sons and forced Rhea to become a Vestal Virgin, but Rhea conceived Romulus and Remus by Mars (or Hercules). Amulius exposed the newborns to die but a she-wolf found and suckled them. A shepherd and his wife raised them to manhood. The twins were natural leaders, and acquired many followers. When told their true identities, they killed Amulius, restored Numitor to the throne of Alba Longa and decided to found a new city for themselves. Romulus wished to build the new city on the Palatine Hill but Remus preferred the Aventine Hill. They agreed to determine the site through augury. Romulus received the more favorable signs but each claimed the results in his favor. Remus was killed in the dispute. Romulus named the new city Rome, after himself, and created the Roman Legions and the Roman Senate. Rome's population was swelled by landless refugees and outlaws, mostly men. They abducted women from the neighboring Sabine tribes, which led to war but eventually resulted the Sabines and Romans joining. In later life Romulus became increasingly autocratic, disappeared in mysterious circumstances and was deified as the god Quirinus, the divine persona of the Roman people. Ancient historians had no doubt that Romulus gave his name to the city. Most modern historians believe the mythological narrative is mostly or entirely fiction.

|Romulus|, |Romulus,| |Son| |of| |Maxentius,| |Died| |309| |A.D.||half| |follis|
David Sear identifies this simple round building without columns as the Sepulcher of Divus Romulus. The ruins of this tomb, which are sometimes erroneously called the stables of the Circus of Caracalla, are situated in a large quadrilateral enclosure forming part of the villa of Maxentius on the Appian way, about one mile from the gate of S. Sebastian.
RT84362. Billon half follis, Hunter V 8, RIC VI Ostia 59, Cohen VII 9, SRCV IV 15051, gF, well centered, porous, weight 5.949 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - 310 A.D.; obverse DIVO ROMVLO N V BIS CONS, bare head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE, Sepulcher of Divus Romulus, brick facade, dome-shaped roof, no columns, right door open, surmounted by eagle with spread wings, MOSTT in exergue; scarce; SOLD


|Romulus|, |Romulus,| |Son| |of| |Maxentius,| |Died| |309| |or| |310| |A.D.||follis|
The Temple of Divus Romulus on the Via Sacra, and adjoining the Basilica Maxentius, was unfinished at the time of the usurper Maxentius' downfall in 312 A.D. Both structures were completed under Constantine. The temple presumably was dedicated to the founder of the city rather than to Maxentius' son.
RT87279. Billon follis, RIC VI Ostia 33, Cohen VII 1, SRCV IV 15045, Hunter V 6 var. (3rd officina), F, well centered, brown tone, weak centers, obverse die break, light corrosion, weight 6.209 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 135o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, late 309 - Oct 312 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXENTIVS DIVO ROMVLO N V FILIO, bare head of Romulus right; reverse AETERNA MEMORIA, Temple of Divus Romulus with six columns and dome-shaped roof surmounted by eagle, right door open, MOSTP in exergue; very scarce; SOLD


Maxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

|Maxentius|, |Maxentius,| |February| |307| |-| |28| |October| |312| |A.D.||follis|
This interesting reverse includes two sets of twin brothers; Romulus and Remus suckling the she-wolf are flanked by the Disocuri twins Castor and Pollux, with their horses.
RB72416. Billon follis, RIC VI Ostia 16, Cohen VII 10, SRCV IV 14976, Hunter V 25 var. (2nd officina), gVF, weight 6.821 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Ostia (port of Rome) mint, 308 - 310 A.D.; obverse IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right, bare right shoulder from behind; reverse AETERNITAS AVG N, Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, naked except chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand, she-wolf suckling twins in center, MOSTA in exergue; SOLD







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