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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Holyland Antiquities||View Options:  |  |  | 

Holyland Antiquities
Byzantine Empire, Levante or Alexandria, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D., Jewish Menorah Lead Token

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Levante| |or| |Alexandria,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.,| |Jewish| |Menorah| |Lead| |Token||token|
The purpose of Byzantine era lead tokens is unknown. Many appear closely related to seals differing only by the absence of a cord or channel for attachment to a container or document. Many late Roman and early Byzantine seals have a figural type on one side and a legend in two lines in Latin or Greek on the other side. Seals with a menorah are known, usually with a blank globular reverse, but some also have a name on the other side.
JD98657. Lead token, personal token of Rodanos(?); Roma e-sale 53 (7 Feb 2019), lot 504 (same dies), VF, highlighting earthen deposit desert patina, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 180o, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse Menorah of seven branches, flanked by lulav on left and etrog on right; reverse PO∆A/NOY in two lines across field, palm frond above; ex CNG e-auction 435 (2 Jan 2019), lot 401; extremely rare; $1800.00 SALE PRICE $1620.00


Canaanite, Cypriot Imitative Lentoid Terracotta Pilgrim Flask, Late Bronze Age - Early Iron Age, c. 1400 - 1100 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Cypriot| |Imitative| |Lentoid| |Terracotta| |Pilgrim| |Flask,| |Late| |Bronze| |Age| |-| |Early| |Iron| |Age,| |c.| |1400| |-| |1100| |B.C.|
This flask came to us identified as a Cypriot flask found in Israel. This form is from Cyprus but most Cypriot specimens are "red lustrous ware." Click here to see a superb Cypriot flask in the British Museum. Our specimen is red-orange clay with a buff or brown slip and clearly cruder than the Cypriot examples. It is imitative of the Cypriot type, almost certainly made locally in Canaan. The referenced Canaanite flask is discussed in Trude Dothan's (1979), Excavations at the cemetery of Deir El-Balah (available online). Deir El-Balah is in the central Gaza Strip. The cemetery's main period of use spans the 13th century B.C., with a possible beginning in the 14th and extension into the 12th. The flask was found in grave 116, cut into the sandstone, and containing an anthropoid coffin and burial gifts that indicate, like other similar burials in the cemetery, the dead was of high position, had an Egyptian cultural affiliation, and must have lived in the area. Dothan notes several similar flasks from other Canaanite excavations, one dated c. 1250 - 1200, and others found in a mixed Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age context.
BK23894. cf. Deir El-Balah (Qedem 10) p. 40, 29; see note 9 for a list of other finds; for Cypriot prototype see BM Online 1899-1229-102, Choice, complete and intact, slip worn, terracotta lentoid pilgrim flask, 19 cm (7 1/2") tall, red-orange clay with a buff-brown slip, asymmetrical lentoid body wheel made in two joined halves, long neck, mouth just slightly flared, single handle from shoulder to neck; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $1100.00 SALE PRICE $990.00


Roman-Byzantine, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Dropper Flask, c. Late 1st - Early 5th Century A.D.

|Glass| |Antiquities|, |Roman-Byzantine,| |Syro-Palestinian,| |Glass| |Dropper| |Flask,| |c.| |Late| |1st| |-| |Early| |5th| |Century| |A.D.|
Thick enamel-like weathering, as seen on this piece, is common on glass found in the Levant and this piece is certainly from the Levante. This flask is, however, a bit of a mystery. There is nothing very similar in the large library of ancient and medieval glass references held by Forum. It resembles an aryballos, but lacks the handles which define that type. It probably was used like an aryballos, to store and dispense scented oil which was rubbed on the skin and then scraped off to clean the body. The date is uncertain. Weathering obscures the original color, making another mystery, but the only other a similar flasks we know are described as opaque black glass.
AG20822. Isings -, et al. -; apparently unpublished but two similar pieces are known from the market (priced $2,500 - $3,000!), Choice, complete and intact, thick tan and brown enamel-like weathering, dropper flask, free-blown, amber(?) glass, 12.0 cm (4 3/4") tall, 8.5 cm maximum diameter, piriform body, very short narrow neck, broad flat folded in rim, round bottom with large pontil mark, not designed to stand on its own we will include a stand; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; very rare form; $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93895. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; cf. Sussman Late 3141; Schloessinger 450; Bailey BMC -; 8.2 cm (3 1/4") long, Choice, complete and intact, earthen deposits fill most of incised decorations, traces of soot on nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink clay, mold made with incised and/or punched decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, row of pellets in annulets over diagonal lines around shoulders, incised lines lengthwise on handle, two pellet in annulet punches on the bottom; $120.00 (124.80) ON RESERVE


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93940. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; cf. Sussman Late 3126; Schloessinger 451; Bailey BMC -; 8.7 cm (3 3/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, tiny chips (from ancient use), earthen deposits, soot at nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink clay, buff slip, mold made with incised and/or punched decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim and incised groove surround a large fill hole, pair of grooves on handle, incised oblique lines radiating from fill hole (wreath?) on narrow convex shoulders, incised herringbone pattern on bottom of the nozzle; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Roman, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Terracotta Disk Lamp, 150 - 300 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Roman,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Terracotta| |Disk| |Lamp,| |150| |-| |300| |A.D.|
The disk lamp, widely copied and produced in abundance, spread everywhere across the Roman Empire, starting from the second half of the 1st century A.D., throughout the 2nd century, and continuing into the 3rd century A.D. The popular acceptance of Roman lamps by Jews probably presented a problem for conservative Jews who remained suspicious of all things Roman. This likely accounts for the statement in the Mishnah that the Palestinian Rabbi Eliezer ben Hyrcanus (active around 80 - 120 A.D.) held that a lamp's filling-hole should be large enough for a small coin to drop through it. Roman lamps usually had a decorated discus and small filling-hole. The plain discus on many of these lamps produced in the Levant may have been an attempt by manufacturers to avoid offending conservative Jewish clients, who broke the discus to make a larger hole.
AL93939. Kennedy Type 5, cf. Warschaw 45 - 47 (incised decoration), Adler Type 3.5/R.2 (decorated); 8.1 cm (3 3/16") long, Choice, complete and intact, encrustation, red clay, buff slip, mold made, round disk body, small short rounded nozzle, no handle, concave discus with small offset filling hole, coarse finishing, undecorated; $100.00 (104.00) ON RESERVE


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. At this time,, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; Sussman Late 3125- 3136; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, encrustation, wear, soot on nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Roman, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Northern Israel & Transjordan, "Daroma" Imitative Oil Lamp, c. 90 - 280 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Roman,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Northern| |Israel| |&| |Transjordan,| |"Daroma"| |Imitative| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |90| |-| |280| |A.D.|
This lamp, from northern Israel or Jordan, is a locally made copy of the Daroma types from Judaea. A large group of "Daroma" imitative lamps was found in a potters shop excavated in Jerash, Jordan. This lamp might have been made in Jerash, but similar lamps have also been found in, and were presumable made at Caesarea, and at other sites in Jordan and Northern Israel.
AL93941. Anawati C174; 8.3 cm (3 1/4") long, Average, weathered, encrusted, c. 90 - 280 A.D.; mould-made, splayed nozzle with round tip, arched top and bow shaped sides, round double convex body with sharp carination, small fill hole, tongue shaped handle, slight ring base, decorations obscure; $60.00 (62.40) ON RESERVE


Kingdom of Israel, Pottery Bowl, Iron Age I, 1200 - 800 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Israel,| |Pottery| |Bowl,| |Iron| |Age| |I,| |1200| |-| |800| |B.C.|
Time of Samuel and Judges.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

Found in Israel.
AH48135. Pottery bowl; cf. Amiran pl. 60, 1; buff, wheel-made, ovoid body, vertical side rim, pedestal ring base, 2 inches high x 6 inches diameter, Superb, intact, SOLD







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