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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Poseidon or Neptune||View Options:  |  |  | 

Poseidon or Neptune

Poseidon was one of the twelve Olympians, god of the sea, earthquakes, storms, and horses. Poseidon became lord of the sea following the defeat of his father Cronus, when the world was divided by lot among his three sons: Zeus was given the sky, Hades the underworld, and Poseidon the sea, with the Earth and Mount Olympus belonging to all three. Poseidon was protector of seafarers and of many cities, but was also known to be bad-tempered, moody, and vengeful when insulted. He could create springs with a strike of his trident. His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Demetrios| |I| |Poliorketes,| |306| |-| |283| |B.C.||AE| |13|
Demetrius I Poliorketes (The Besieger), son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, was given the title king by his father in 306 B.C. after he defeated Ptolemy I at the Battle of Salamis. In 294 he seized the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V. The combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, forced him out of Macedonia in 288. Abandoned by his troops on the field of battle he surrendered to Seleucus in 286 and died in captivity in 283 B.C.
GB93465. Bronze AE 13, cf. HGC 3 1031 (R2), Newell 62 corr. (says monogram on left in error), SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, F, green patina, corrosion and scattered pits, weight 2.115 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain western Anatolian mint, c. 298 - 295 B.C.; obverse prow of war galley left, Athena on deck standing left blowing trumpet and holding stylis; reverse Poseidon Pelagaios standing left, brandishing trident with right hand, nude but for chlamys draped over extended left arm, control monogram right(?), B - A low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $80.00 (€73.60)
 


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

|Gallienus|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
Neptune was the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion. He is the counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon. In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune was the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers presided over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld. Salacia was his consort. Neptune was likely associated with fresh water springs before the sea. Like Poseidon, Neptune was worshiped by the Romans also as a god of horses, under the name Neptunus Equester, a patron of horse-racing.
RL94212. Billon antoninianus, Göbl MIR 1638a, RSC IV 849, RIC V-1 S603, Hunter IV S198, SRCV III 10328, VF/F, well centered, some silvering, porosity/corrosion, weight 3.181 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse P M TR P XV P P· (Pontifex Maximus, Tribunicia Potestate XV, Pater Patriae), Neptune standing left, nude but for cloak on left arm foot on prow, right foot on prow, right elbow on right knee, trident in left hand, VII C (COS VII) in exergue; $30.00 (€27.60)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Demetrios| |I| |Poliorketes,| |306| |-| |283| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
The bull's horns suggest his relationship to Poseidon is the same as Alexander's to Zeus Ammon. The portrait is individualized, but evokes the image of Alexander. Demetrios was the first to assimilate elements of Alexander's deified portrait and the first living ruler to portray himself as a god on coins. -- www.lawrence.edu
SH54897. Silver tetradrachm, Newell 81, SNG Alpha Bank 948, gVF, toned, weight 16.449 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 291 - 290 B.C.; obverse Demetrios diademed head right with horns of a bull, the animal sacred to Demetrios' patron deity, Poseidon; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY, Poseidon standing left, nude, right foot on rock, trident in left (apparently inspired by the Lateran Poseidon, a statue by Lysippos, court sculptor of Alexander); ex Pegasi Numismatics, toned, high relief and nice style; SOLD







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