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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D.

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The star in the field, a symbol of the sun-god, stands for the mint of Rome.
RS77436. Silver denarius, RIC IV 40a; RSC III 184; BMCRE V p. 567, 242; Hunter III 49 var. draped; cf. SRCV II 7533 (TR P III), VF, well centered, nice portrait, toned, some die wear, porous, weight 3.150 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, Rome mint, 221 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right, shoulders seen from behind; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for cloak over shoulders and left arm and flying behind, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip vertical in left hand, star in left field; $100.00 (85.00)


Terina, Bruttium, Italy, c. 420 - 400 B.C.

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Terina was on top of a hill called Piano di Tirenathe on the north shore of the Gulf of Saint Euphemia, about 20 km (12 mi) from Lamezia Terme in Calabria. The hill is surrounded by two rivers merging, Savuto and Grande, and it perfectly matches the description provided by the Greek historian Strabo in his major work Geographica, which was first published around 20 A.D. The site of the city was allegedly found in 1922 by the archaeologist Paolo Orsi near the modern village of Sant'Eufemia Vetere, but a systematic archaeological investigation was only started in 1997 and it is only based on coins found there. Coins, inscriptions and other artifacts retrieved from the site can be seen in the Museo Archeologico Lametino in Lamezia Terme.
GI85333. Silver triobol, HN Italy 2624, F, toned, tight flan, etched surfaces, weight 1.127 g, maximum diameter 11.4 mm, die axis 180o, Terina mint, 420 - 400 B.C.; obverse head of Nymph Terina right, Π(?) behind neck; reverse winged Nike seated left on cippus, wearing long chiton and peplos, scepter(?) in right hand, left hand resting on cippus, TEPIN upper left, Π(?) lower right; $100.00 (85.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The Temple of Apollo Palatinus, on the Palatine Hill, was dedicated by Octavian on 9 October 28 B.C. in return for vows made for his victories over Sextus Pompeius at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 B.C. and over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium 31 B.C. It was built on a site where a lightning bolt had struck. Augustus' private house was directly connected to the terrace of the sanctuary. Ancient sources state the temple had ivory doors and held numerous works of sculpture. The remains were excavated in the 1960s.
RS85050. Silver denarius, Szaivert MIR 18 p.165, 805; BMCRE IV 271, pl. 97, 17 (aureus); RIC III 197 (S) var. (obv. leg.), RSC II 30 var. (same), Hunter II - (clv), F, dark deposits, rough, lamination defects, edge cracks, weight 2.082 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 189 A.D.; obverse M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right; reverse APOLLINI PALATINO, Apollo Palatinus standing facing, head right, laureate and wearing long robe, plectrum in right hand, lyre resting on a column in left hand; there were only two specimens of this type in the Reka Devnia Hoard, and there are none on coin archives.; extremely rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, 400 - 350 B.C.

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Mytilene on the southeast edge of Lesbos, opposite the mainland, was founded about 1054 B.C. It was initially confined to a small island just offshore that later was joined to Lesbos, creating a north and south harbor. In the 7th century B.C., Mytilene successfully contested for the leadership of Lesbos with Methymna, on the north side of the island. Mytilene became the center of the island's prosperous eastern hinterland.
GS86526. Silver diobol, cf. BMC Troas, p. 185, 8-14; SNG Cop 368; SNGvA 7749 - 7750 HGC 6 1037 (R1); Weber 5670 (various control marks), VF, tight flan cutting off legend and control mark (if any), obverse off center, marks, porosity, weight 1.254 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse head of Aphrodite right, hair rolled, control mark left (?, off flan); ex David Cannon collection, ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos, c. 480 - 470 B.C.

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Panticapaeum (Kerch, Ukraine) was an important city and port in Tauric Chersonesos on the western side of the Cimmerian Bosporus. It was founded by Milesians in the late 7th or early 6th century B.C. In the 5th century B.C. it became the capital of the Thracian kings of Bosporus. The last of the kings of Bosporus left it to Mithridates VI Eupator, king of Pontus. After his defeat to Rome, he committed suicide at Panticapaeum in 63 B.C. In that same year, the city was partly destroyed by an earthquake.
GA86537. Silver hemiobol, Frolova, type I, 25 - 26; SNG Stancomb 511; SNG Fitzwilliam 1592; Klein 73; McClean II 4442; HGC 7 40 (R2), gF, toned, tight irregular flan, etched porous surfaces, weight 0.613 g, maximum diameter 9.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 480 - 470 B.C.; obverse facing lion head; reverse quadripartite incuse square; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Persian Empire, Philistia (Gaza or Samaria), c. 375 - 333 B.C., Imitative of Athens

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A Persian Period imitation of Athenian types from the Holy Land. In the past these coins were all attributed to Gaza, however, recent hoard finds indicate a mint at Ashkelon probably also struck this type. It is likely that at least several small mints struck these imitative types.
JD86845. Silver hemiobol, cf. Samaria Hoard pls. 50 - 51, SH306 ff.; SNG ANS 20, gF, toned, die wear, rough/porous, irregular flan, edge chips, weight 0.216 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, die axis 270o, Gaza(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, hair in parallel bands, very large eye in profile; reverse owl standing right, wings closed, head facing, olive spray with one olive between two leaves behind (no crescent visible), AΘE downward on right (off flan), all in incuse square; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Persian Empire, Philistia (Gaza or Samaria), c. 375 - 333 B.C., Imitative of Athens

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A Persian Period imitation of Athenian types from the Holy Land. In the past these coins were all attributed to Gaza, however, recent hoard finds indicate a mint at Ashkelon probably also struck this type. It is likely that at least several small mints struck these imitative types.
JD86846. Silver obol, cf. Samaria Hoard pls. 45 - 50, SH269 ff.; Gitler-Tal 4.4.IX.1O; SNG ANS 18; Sofaer Gaza pl. 103, 6, F, toned, rough, tight rhomboid flan, weight 0.650 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gaza(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, hair in parallel bands, eye in profile; reverse owl standing right, wings closed, head facing, olive spray with one olive between two leaves and a crescent behind, AΘE downward on right, all in incuse square, no Aramaic inscription; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Tenedos, Islands off Troas, c. 550 - 470 B.C.

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Philonome, the second wife of King Cycnus of Colonae, falsely accused her stepson Tenes of rape, using the flutist Eumolpus as witness. Cycnus believed the accusation and tried to kill Tenes and his sister Hemithea by placing them both in a chest, which was set into the ocean. However, the chest landed on the island of Leucophrye, where they made Tenes their king and renamed the island Tenedos. Cycnus later learned the truth, killed Eumolpus, and buried Philonome alive. When Cycnus' ship landed at Tenedos in hopes of reconciliation, Tenes rebuffed him and cut the mooring with a labrys. Tenes fought for the Trojans in the Trojan War and was slain by Achilles. After the war, Agamemnon permitted the Trojan prisoners to build a city north of Mycenea. The city was called Tenea and they founded a sanctuary where sacrifices were offered to Tenes. No flute player was allowed to enter the sacred precinct, and the name of Achilles was not to be uttered. Map of Troas
GS83935. Silver obol, SNG Cop 509; SNGvA 1587; SNG Mnchen 340; SNG Tbingen 2677; BMC Troas p. 91, 7; Rosen 536; Weber 5448, HGC 6 381; SGCV II 5151, VF, tight flan, uneven toning, edge crack, weight 0.584 g, maximum diameter 8.3 mm, Tenedos (Bozcaada, Turkey) mint, c. 550 - 470 B.C.; obverse janiform head of a diademed female left and laureate bearded male right; reverse labrys (double axe), T-E divided by handle, all within an incuse square, no linear border; ex Wilson H Guertin; $100.00 (85.00)


Tabai, Caria, c. 80 - 50 B.C.

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On some very similar Tabai hemidrachms with the same types (SNG Cop 534, SNG Keckman 268, BMC Caria p. 163, 25), there is no wreath and the magistrate is identified as Callicrates, (son of) Brachylidas. It is possible that there were two different KAΛ magistrates.
GS83936. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 535 (same rev. die), SNGvA 2701 var. (inscriptions downward), ff. var. (magistrate), F, centered on a tight flan, porous, die wear, weight 1.759 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Tabai mint, c. 80 - 50 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; reverse Nike advancing right, raising wreath in extended right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand, TABHNΩN upward on left, KAΛ (magistrate, Callicrates?) upward on right, all within laurel wreath; ex Wilson H. Guertin; ϖερψ ραρε; $100.00 (85.00)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RS87249. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; SRCV II 8217, VF, toned, porous, weight 2.932 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 (85.00)




  



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Silver Under $100