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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |In This Sign...||View Options:  |  |  | 

In This Sign You Will Be The Victor

The Roman, Byzantine, crusader and other coins below carry the symbols of Christ. In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Chi Rho Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO ERIS, meaning "In this sign you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions' standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor. Click here to read Christian Themes in |Byzantine| Coinage by Zach Margulies.

Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

|Procopius|, |Procopius,| |28| |September| |365| |-| |27| |May| |366| |A.D.||centenionalis|NEW
Serenianus a general with a reputation for cruelty, was once the executioner of Constantius Gallus, and had previously served as Valens' comes domesticorum (commander of the imperial bodyguard). After Procopius rebelled, loyal to Valens, he went to Cyzicus, where an imperial officer named Venustus had retreated with money intended to pay the troops. Serenianus was confident in the city garrison and in the strength of the city walls, but Procopius wanted the payroll. He collected a strong army, besieged and captured the city. Serenianus was sent as a prisoner to Nicaea. During the night after Procopius was killed, Marcellus, a relative of Procopius in command of the garrison of Nicaea, entered the Palace where Serenianus was held, and killed him. Marcellus was later captured and executed.
RL110796. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 1928, RIC IX Nicomedia 10.4 (R3), Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19884, aVF, well centered, near full legends, green patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 2.842 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, (Christ monogram) in upper right field, SMNA in exergue; very rare; $150.00 (151.50)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |&| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||hexagram|NEW
Heraclius came to power through revolt against Phocas. He defeated the Sassanids, but this only facilitated the Arab conquests. The Byzantines lost Syria and Palestine before Heraclius died and Egypt fell soon after. Heraclius Constantine was made joint emperor at 8 months old. He was in poor health when his father died and lived only about 100 days as senior emperor.
BZ110678. Silver hexagram, DOC II-1 64, Wroth BMC 100, Morrisson BnF 10/Cp/AR/06, Tolstoi 216, Ratto 1390, Hahn MIB III 140, Sommer 11.47, SBCV 798, F, scratches, bumps, uneven weak strike, weight 6.641 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 615 - 638 A.D.; obverse dd NN hERACLIUS ET hERA CONSTI (Our lords, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine), Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine enthroned facing, each holds globus cruciger, cross above; reverse dEUS AdIUTA ROmANIS (May God help the Romans), cross potent on globe above three steps, K right; Zeus Numismatics auction 25 (23 Oct 2022), lot 750; scarce; $110.00 (111.10)


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |&| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||hexagram|NEW
Heraclius came to power through revolt against Phocas. He defeated the Sassanids, but this only facilitated the Arab conquests. The Byzantines lost Syria and Palestine before Heraclius died and Egypt fell soon after. Heraclius Constantine was made joint emperor at 8 months old. He was in poor health when his father died and lived only about 100 days as senior emperor.
BZ110679. Silver hexagram, DOC II-1 64, Wroth BMC 100, Morrisson BnF 10/Cp/AR/06, Tolstoi 216, Ratto 1390, Hahn MIB III 140, Sommer 11.47, SBCV 798, F, scratches, edge cracks, uneven weak strike, weight 6.540 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 615 - 638 A.D.; obverse dd NN hERACLIUS ET hERA CONSTI (Our lords, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine), Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine enthroned facing, each holds globus cruciger, cross above; reverse dEUS AdIUTA ROmANIS (May God help the Romans), cross potent on globe above three steps, K right; Zeus Numismatics auction 25 (23 Oct 2022), lot 752; scarce; $110.00 (111.10)


Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - Early October 404 A.D., Wife of Arcadius

|Eudoxia|, |Eudoxia,| |Augusta| |9| |January| |400| |-| |Early| |October| |404| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Arcadius||centenionalis|
The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL110194. Bronze centenionalis, Hunter V 4 (also 3rd officina), RIC X Arcadius 104 (S), LRBC II 2800, DOCLR 288, SRCV V 20895, VF, dark green patina, earthen encrustation, weight 3.216 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 135o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right on cuirass, inscribing Christogram on shield resting on cippus, ANTΓ in exergue; scarce; $90.00 (90.90)


Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.

|Honorius|, |Honorius,| |23| |January| |393| |-| |15| |August| |423| |A.D.||solidus|
Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
SH53618. Gold solidus, RIC X Arcadius 38 (R2); Depeyrot p. 225, 44/2; DOCLR 756; SRCV V 20900, gVF, weight 4.379 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 397 - 402 A.D.; obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, helmeted bust facing, diademed, cuirassed, cross on breast plate, spear in right over right shoulder behind head, shield decorated with horseman on left arm; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG (harmony between the two emperors), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, holding long scepter and Victory on globe, foot on prow, COMOB in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
Struck at Ravenna where the late western emperors' made their capital.
SH28125. Gold solidus, RIC X Valentinian III 2018, Cohen VIII 19, SRCV 4310, EF, weight 4.425 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, Ravenna mint, c. 430 - 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Valentinian standing facing, foot on the head of a man-faced snake with closed coil, holding long cross and Victory on globe, R left, V right, COMOB in exergue; slightly double-struck, a couple very small light scratches; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Leontius, 695 - 698 A.D.

|Leontius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Leontius,| |695| |-| |698| |A.D.||solidus|
Leontius' success as a general forced the Arab Caliph Abd al-Malik to make concessions and pay tribute to Emperor Justinian II; but when war was renewed, Leontius was defeated. Furious over the loss, Justinian imprisoned him for two years. When he was freed, Leontius and his former prison comrades organized a revolt, and he took the throne. Justinian was deposed, his nose and tongue were slit and he was exiled to a monastery. After the Arabs took Carthage, the fleet Leontius sent to retake the city failed. Rather than report defeat to the emperor, the army overthrew their admiral and named Apsimar, a Germanic sailor, as their leader. Apsimar changed his name to Tiberius, returned to Constantinople, seized the thrown, cut off Leontius' nose and ears and exiled him to a monastery. In 705, Justinian II returned to Constantinople with an army of Bulgars and Slavs. Both Leontius and Tiberius were dragged through the streets in chains and beheaded.
SH89538. Gold solidus, DOC II-2 1b, Morrisson BnF 16/Cp/AV/02, SBCV 1330, Hahn MIB III 1, Sommer 15.1, Wroth BMC -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, EF, mint luster, flow lines, uneven strike with part of obverse legend and mintmark weak, obverse off center, die wear, tight flan, weight 4.319 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople mint, 695 - 698 A.D.; obverse D LEO-N PE AV, bearded facing bust, wearing loros and crown with cross, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse VICTORIA AVSY S, cross potent set on three step, CONOB in exergue; from the Robert Watcher Collection; rare; SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
SH26056. Gold solidus, RIC X Valentinian III 2018, Cohen VIII 19, SRCV 4310, EF, weight 4.408 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 195o, Ravenna mint, c. 430 - 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Valentinian standing facing, foot on the head of a man-faced snake with closed coil, holding long cross and Victory on globe, R left, V right, COMOB in exergue; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 1 August 527 - 14 November 565 A.D., minted at Rome by Belisaurius

|Justinian| |I|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Justinian| |I,| |1| |August| |527| |-| |14| |November| |565| |A.D.,| |minted| |at| |Rome| |by| |Belisaurius||solidus|
Tradition tells us that the Roman Empire ended in 476 A.D. when Romulus Augustus was deposed and the barbarian Odovacar became king in Italy. This coin, however, was minted in Rome for the emperor of the Romans about 75 years after the "fall of the Roman Empire." Between 536 and 540 Belisaurius recaptured Rome for the Empire. A closer look at history sometime complicates rather than clarifies.

The figure on the reverse is an Angel, not Victory as on the reverse of many Roman and Byzantine coins. The difference - Victory is female but angels are male.
SH06196. Gold solidus, SBCV 291 variant, DOC I 320c1, Hahn MIB I 34/4, Berk -, aEF, weight 4.42 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 185o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 542 - 546 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS PP AG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, globus cruciger in right, shield decorated with horseman on left shoulder; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG A (victory of the three emperors, 1st officina), Angel standing facing holding long cross in right and globus cruciger in left, star right, COMOB exergue; from the Woolslayer Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell; rare; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Constans II and Constantine IV, 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D.

|Constans| |II|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constans| |II| |and| |Constantine| |IV,| |13| |April| |654| |-| |15| |July| |668| |A.D.||solidus|
In 662, Constans II invaded south Italy.
SH56768. Gold solidus, Wroth BMC 57; Tolstoi 301; DOC II-2 30e (not in collection, refs W. & T.); Morrisson BnF - (p. 339, same); Hahn MIB 31; Sommer 12.23; SBCV 964, EF, sharp and lustrous, weight 4.381 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 661 - 663 A.D.; obverse [legend fragmentary], facing busts of Constans & Constantine IV, Constans wears plumed helmet, Constantine a helmet with cross, small cross between heads; reverse VICTORIA AVGU S (victory of the Emperor, 6th officina), cross potent on three steps between Heraclius (left) and Tiberius standing facing, each wears crown and chlamys and holds globus cruciger in right, CONOB in exergue; scarce; SOLD







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