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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |Ray Nouri Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The Ray Nouri Collection

Ray Nouri, of Upstate New York, began assembling this collection with his father in the 1950s, and has continued to add to the collection until today. The collection reflects the love for ancient history and for the beauty of ancient numismatic art that Ray and his father shared. Ray writes, "These were the main factors that drove my father to collect and study these ancient coins. He spent countless hours mapping the origin, routes and background that each coin followed. He used to say to me, 'Do you know you are holding a piece of history in your hands when you hold one of these coins?'" Here we list only some of the several thousand coins in the collection, coming from across the ancient world, including the Holy Land. More will be added over time. Ray shares his wishes for new owners of these coins, "I truly hope you enjoy them as much as my father and I have throughout the years."

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |454| |-| |404| |B.C.,| |Old| |Style| |Tetradrachm|, |tetradrachm|
The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
SH94515. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Munchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, VF, well centered, high relief, uneven toning, bumps and marks, graffito on reverse, small edge cracks, test cut, weight 16.822 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $500.00 SALE |PRICE| $450.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation. While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health. Her name is the source of the word "hygiene."
RS94701. Silver denarius, RSC II 762b; Hunter II 13; SRCV II 5702; RIC III M649 var. (draped); BMCRE IV p. 503, M780 (draped), VF, nice young portrait, flow lines, slight porosity, uneven tone, edge ragged with cracks, weight 3.011 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec 177 - Dec 178 A.D.; obverse L AVREL COMMODVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse TR P III IMP II COS P P, Salus seated left, branch extended in right hand, left arm rests on chair, snake rising up from the ground before her; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
In 185, Commodus drained Rome's treasury to put on gladiatorial spectacles and confiscated property to support his pleasures. He participated as a gladiator and boasted of victory in 1,000 matches in the Circus Maximus.
RS94706. Silver denarius, RIC III 121; RSC II 497; BMCRE IV p. 723, *; SRCV II-; Hunter V -, VF, some legend off flan, small edge cracks, weight 2.747 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Dec. 185 A.D.; obverse M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XI IMP VII COS V P P, Felicitas standing front, head left, caduceus in right hand and vertical scepter in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. coins.
RS94703. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV 309 (also star right), RIC III 241, RSC II 288, Hunter V -, SRCV II -, aVF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, scattered mild porosity, reverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.806 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 192 A.D.; obverse L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, laureate head right; reverse LIB AVG P M TR P XVII COS VII P P, Libertas standing slightly left, head left, pileus (freedom cap - worn by freed slaves) in right hand, vindicta (rod) in vertical in left hand, star right field; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
The elaborate Annona reverse composition reflects the special care Commodus took in supplying the much needed African grain to Rome (in fear of mob uprisings).
RS94704. Silver denarius, RIC III 95, RSC II 17, BMCRE IV 144, MIR 18 647, SRCV II 5627, Hunter II - (p. clii), VF, centered on a tight flan, some mint luster, flow lines, part of edge ragged with splits and cracks, weight 2.770 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 184 A.D.; obverse COMM ANT AVG P BRIT, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P VIIII IMP VII COS IIII P P, Annona standing slightly left, head left, statuette of Concordia holding patera and scepter in Annona's right hand, cornucopia in her left hand, modius overflowing with grain at feet on left, two persons on prow at feet on right, ANN in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, |denarius|
In Fasti III, Ovid called Minerva the "goddess of a thousand works." She was worshiped throughout Italy, and when she eventually became equated with the Greek goddess Athena, she also became a goddess of battle. Unlike Mars, god of war, she was sometimes portrayed with sword lowered, in sympathy for the recent dead, rather than raised in triumph. In Rome, her bellicose nature was emphasized less than elsewhere. Her worship was also spread throughout the empire; in Britain, for example, she was syncretized with the local goddess Sulis, who was often invoked for restitution for theft.
RS94643. Silver denarius, RIC III A463(a), RSC II 676, BMCRE A837, Hunter II 19, Strack III A284, SRCV II -, gF, toned, nice portrait for the grade, flow lines, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.169 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 154 - 155 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII FIL, bare head right; reverse TR POT VIIII COS II, Minerva standing slightly left, head left, wearing crested helmet, owl in extended right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, grounded spear leaning on her forearm; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RS94652. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV AP894, RIC III AP473, RSC II 721, Hunter II 21, SRCV II -, VF, toned, flow lines, die wear, porosity, weight 3.289 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 156 - 157 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG PII F, bare head right; reverse TR POT XI COS II P P, Virtus in military dress, standing left, parazonium with hilt up in right hand, spear in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.|, |denarius|
In 160 A.D., Rome first started commercial manufacturing of soap. It was made with grease, lime and ashes. The earliest evidence of man using soap dates around 2800 B.C. The first soap makers were Babylonians, Mesopotamians, Egyptians, and later Greeks and Romans. They all made soap by mixing fat, oils and salts. Some early Roman soap included urine as an ingredient. Soap wasn't used for bathing or personal hygiene but was used for cleaning cooking utensils or goods. It may have been used for medicinal purposes.
RS94658. Silver denarius, RIC III AP483, RSC II 762; BMCRE IV p. 149, AP998; Hunter II, p. 281, 28; SRCV II 4797, aVF, well centered, light toning, rough surface, weight 3.260 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 159 - 160 A.D.; obverse AVRELIVS CAES AVG PII F, bearded bare head right; reverse TR POT XIIII COS II, Minerva advancing right, helmeted, draped, wearing aegis, brandishing spear in right hand, round shield on left forearm; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

|Commodus|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.|, |denarius|
References identify this type as Fides holding a standard resembling a knotty stick. It is a very odd standard.
RS94641. Silver denarius, BMCRE IV 316, RSC II 583, RIC III 233, SRCV II 5684, Hunter - (p. clvii), VF, well centered, toned, flow lines, struck with worn dies, small edge cracks, weight 3.264 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 191 - Dec 192 A.D.; obverse L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVII IMP VIII COS VII P P, Fides standing left, standard resembling a knotty stick in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RS94710. Silver denarius, RIC III 200c, RSC II 582, BMCRE IV 729, Strack III 229, SRCV II 4095, Hunter II -, F, radiating flow lines, scratches and bumps, edge cracks, weight 2.402 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 150 - 151 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES T AEL HADR ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right; reverse TR POT XIIII COS IIII, Pax standing half left, head left, olive branch downward in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, PAX in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00




  



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