Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Last Day of 10% Off Store-Wide Sale!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Last Day of 10% Off Store-Wide Sale!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Hide empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia| ▸ |Other Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Phrygia

Phrygia lies in western central Anatolia (Asia Minor) between Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Pisidia, and Galatia. The cities were found in the valleys and high plains between the many high mountains of the land. The native Phrygians, whose inscriptions have not yet been deciphered, fell under Lydian, then Persian, then Macedonian rule. Greek and Macedonian settlers were planted in Phrygia by the Seleucids and Attalids in a mutual rivalry, but northern Phrygia was overrun by Celts (eventually it would become Galatia). After the defeat of Antiochus at Magnesia, Phrygia was assigned to the kingdom of Pergamum in 188 B.C., after which it became intensely Hellenized and first struck coins. Rome took control, along with the rest of the Pergamene kingdom, in 133 B.C.

Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Aezani, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Aezani,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Aizanoi, Latinized as Aezani, was an Ancient Greek city in western Anatolia. Located in what is now Cavdarhisar, Kutahya Province, its ruins are situated astride the River Penkalas, some 1,000 meters above sea level. The city was an important political and economic center in Roman times. Surviving remains from the period include a well-preserved Temple of Zeus, unusual combined thereat-stadium complex, and macellum inscribed with the Price Edict of Diocletian. The city fell into decline in Late Antiquity. Later serving as a citadel, in 2012 the site was submitted for addition to the UNESCO World Heritage List.
RP93134. Bronze AE 18, BMC Phrygia p. 40, 125; Weber 706, SNG Hunterian I 2007, RPC Online IV T1684; SNG Cop 103 var. (obv. leg., crescent and star), aVF, crude style, die wear, minor encrustations, flan crack, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 225o, Aezani (Cavdarhisar, Turkey) mint, 184 - 192 A.D.; obverse AV KAI KOMO∆OC, laureate head right, no trace of drapery; reverse AIZANEITΩN, cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing facing, with arm supports, kalathos on head, no flanking crescent and star; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Kibyra, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Sabina,| |Augusta| |128| |-| |c.| |136| |A.D.,| |Kibyra,| |Phrygia||AE| |18|
Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Gölhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP92640. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online III 2301 (3 spec.), SNG Leypold 1610, SNGvA -, BMC Phrygia -, aF, brassy surfaces with uneven partial toning, porosity, legends weak, weight 3.428 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, diademed and draped bust right, hair coiled above double stephane; reverse KIBYPATΩM, Asclepius standing facing, head left, leaning on serpent-entwined staff; from the Errett Bishop Collection; very rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Colossae, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Colossae,| |Phrygia||AE| |34|
Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
SH33902. Bronze AE 34, RPC Online 1881; vA Phrygiens II 575 (same dies, Vatican museum); BMC Phrygia -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; et all -, aVF, weight 21.042 g, maximum diameter 34.3 mm, die axis 225o, Colossae (near Honaz, Turkey) mint, obverse AYT KAI Λ AYPH KOMMO∆OΣ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΣTPATHΓ TΩN ΠEPI ZΩΣIMON ∆ ΦIΛOΠATOPA KOΛOΣΣHNΩN, Artemis standing right, quiver at shoulder, holding branch and antler of stag standing behind her; ex Sayles and Lavender; extremely rare; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen in Winterthur, Vol. 2: Bosporus, Pontus, Armenia, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Mysia, Troas, Phrygia.... (Winterthur, 1987).
Brett, A. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 2. (London, 1929).
Head, B. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Phrygia. (London, 1906).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia...5th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Bàle, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 24: Phrygien. (Berlin, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Römische Provinzprägungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain I, Part 2, The Newham Davis Coins in the Marischal College Aberdeen. (London, 1936).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. Addenda. (gold and silver). (London, 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus-Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit, Vol. II: Phrygia-Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Russia, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts: Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Leuven, Belgium, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
von Aulock, H. Münzen und Städte Phrygiens. (Tübingen, 1987).
Waddington, W., E. Babelon & T. Reinach. Recueil Général des Monnaies Grecques d'Asie Minuere, Vol. I. (Paris, 1904-25).

Catalog current as of Sunday, August 1, 2021.
Page created in 0.797 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity