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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Provincial ▸ Roman AfricaView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins of Africa

Iol-Caesarea, Mauretania, North Africa, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.

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Phoenicians from Carthage founded Iol as a trading station around 400 B.C. It became a part of the kingdom of Numidia under Jugurtha, c. 160 - 104 B.C. In 29 B.C., Roman emperor Augustus made the Numidian King Juba II and his wife Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Marc Antony and Cleopatra of Egypt) king and queen of Mauretania. The capital was established at Iol, which was renamed Caesarea in honor of the emperor.
GB85358. Bronze 1/4 Unit, Alexandropoulos MAA 147; Falbe-Lindberg III, p. 177, 290 (uncertain mint); SNG Cop 684 var. (kerykeion obv. left), F, dark green patina, tight flan, light corrosion, weight 2.102 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 270o, Iol-Caesarea (Cherchell, Algeria) mint, c. 25 B.C. - 24 A.D.; obverse head of Isis left, wearing vulture crown and horned solar-disk headdress; reverse three ears of barley; extremely rare; $125.00 (Ä106.25)


Kingdom of Numidia, Massinissa 203 - 148 B.C., or Micipsa 148 - 118 B.C.

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Numidia was an Ancient Berber kingdom in what is now Algeria and a smaller part of Tunisia, in North Africa. It was bordered by the kingdoms of Mauretania (modern-day Morocco) to the west, the Roman province of Africa (modern-day Tunisia) to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the Sahara Desert to the south. The long-lived King Masinissa ruled c. 203 -148 B.C. He was succeeded by his son Micipsa. When Micipsa died in 118, he was succeeded by his two sons Hiempsal I and Adherbal, and by his illegitimate grandson, Jugurtha. Jugurtha had Hiempsal killed, which led to war with Adherbal. Rome declared war after Jugurtha killed some Roman businessmen aiding Adherbal. Jugurtha surrendered and received a highly favorable peace treaty, which raised suspicions of bribery. The Roman commander was summoned to Rome to face corruption charges. Jugurtha was also forced to come to Rome to testify, where he was completely discredited. War broke out again and several legions were dispatched to North Africa. The war dragged out into a seemingly endless campaign. Frustrated at the apparent lack of action, Gaius Marius returned to Rome to seek election as Consul. Marius was elected, and then returned to take control of the war. He sent his Quaestor Lucius Cornelius Sulla to neighboring Mauretania to eliminate their support for Jugurtha. With the help of Bocchus I of Mauretania, Sulla captured Jugurtha. In 104 B.C., after being paraded through the streets of Rome in Marius' Triumph, Jugurtha was executed.
GB88307. Bronze AE 28, Alexandropoulos MAA 18a; Mazard III 50; MŁller Afrique III p. 18, 32; SNG Cop 505 ff.; SGCV II 6597, F, dark green patina, some bumps and scratches, scattered porosity, light deposits, edge cracks, weight 15.264 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cirta (Constantine, Algeria) mint, 203 - 118 B.C.; obverse laureate head of king left, pointed beard, dot border; reverse horse galloping left, pellet below, linear border; ex CNG e-Auction 219 (30 Sep 2009), lot 311; $100.00 (Ä85.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Utica, Zeugitana

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Our specimen appears to be struck in copper prompting us naming it "as" but the heavy weight, which is usual for the series over several years probably means that these coins were valued as a dupondius.

MMIV on the reverse stands for Municipes Municipii Julii Uticensis.
SH32262. Copper as (or dupondius), RPC I 738, VF, weight 12.456 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 0o, Zeugitana, Utica mint, 28 - 29 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVG IMP VIII, bare head left; reverse C VIBIO MARSO PROCOS II SEX TADIVS FAVSTVS IIV, Livia seated right, scepter in left, patera in extended right, M - M / I - V across fields; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, April 23, 2019.
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Roman Africa