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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Constantinian Era||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman coins of the Constantinian Era
Constantius Gallus, Caesar, Mid-March 351 - Winter 354 A.D.

|Constantius| |Gallus|, |Constantius| |Gallus,| |Caesar,| |Mid-March| |351| |-| |Winter| |354| |A.D.||maiorina|
This reverse control symbol variety with a star upper center is unpublished for Constantius Gallus in the primary references. The usual, common, type with a dot, not a star, is published for Constantius II (RIC VIII Constantinople 112) and Constantius Gallus (RIC VIII Constantinople 113). This star control symbol is published only on a scarce variant struck for Constantius II (RIC VIII Constantinople 114).
RL97860. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Constantinople 113 var. (star vice dot), LRBC I 2034 var. (same), SRCV V 18985 var. (same), Cohen VIII 8 var. (same), Hunter V -, F, dark green patina, porous, a little rough, scratches, scrape, small edge splits, star control clear in hand, weight 4.712 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 Mar 351 - winter 354 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, ∆ behind; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO (happy times restored), soldier standing left spearing fallen horseman, shield on the ground, horseman wears a pointed cap and falls on the horses neck, B upper left, * upper center, CONSB in exergue; extremely rare, unpublished in the many references examined by FORVM, there is a similar specimen from the 7th officina on wildwinds.com; $140.00 (114.80)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

|Magnentius|, |Magnentius,| |18| |January| |350| |-| |10| |August| |353| |A.D.||heavy| |maiorina|
In 352, Constantius II invaded northern Italy in pursuit of the usurper Magnus Magnentius, who withdrew with his army to Gaul. Constantius declared an amnesty for Magnentius' soldiers, many of whom deserted to him. By the end of the year Constantius entered Milan. After another defeat in battle, Magnentius committed suicide in 353.
RL93376. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Arles 179, Bastien MM 268, LRBC II 437, SRCV V 18824, Cohen VIII 68, Hunter V -, gVF, tight oval flan, uneven strike with small weak areas on edges, tiny deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 4.424 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, spring 351 - August 353 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVGG ET CAE (victories of our lords, the two emperors and two caesars), two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT V MVLT X, E over IS low center, PAR in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (98.40)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
Because of his fame and because he was proclaimed Emperor while he was in Roman Britain, later Britons regarded Constantine as a king of their own people. In the 12th century, Henry of Huntingdon included a passage in his Historia Anglorum that Constantine's mother Helena was a Briton, the daughter of King Cole of Colchester. Geoffrey of Monmouth expanded this story in his highly fictionalized Historia Regum Britanniae, an account of the supposed Kings of Britain from their Trojan origins to the Anglo-Saxon invasion. According to Geoffrey, Cole was King of the Britons when Constantius, here a senator, came to Britain. Afraid of the Romans, Cole submitted to Roman law so long as he retained his kingship. However, he died only a month later, and Constantius took the throne himself, marrying Cole's daughter Helena. They had their son Constantine, who succeeded his father as King of Britain before becoming Roman Emperor. Historically, this series of events is extremely improbable. Constantius had already left Helena by the time he left for Britain. Additionally, no earlier source mentions that Helena was born in Britain, let alone that she was a princess.
RL96885. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Arles p. 206, 17 (R2); Depeyrot EMA p. 73, 56/1; LRBC I 422; Kent 17; SRCV V 17458; Cohen -, aF, a bit rough, ragged edge, minor encrustation, weight 1.474 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, posthumous, 339 A.D.; obverse DIVO CONSTANTINO P, veiled, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse AETERNA PIETAS, Constantine standing facing, head right, wearing military dress, inverted spear in left hand, globe in right hand, X (control symbol) right, SCONST (Constantia) in exergue; this type appears to be rarer than RIC VIII's R2 rating indicates; rare; $120.00 (98.40)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||centenionalis|
In 328 Arelatum (Arelate) was renamed Constantina in honor of Constantine II. After Constantine II was killed in 340, the name reverted to Arelatum, only to be changed again in 354 to Constantina by Constantius II. It retained that name, although the mintmark 'AR' appeared on some of its coins even in the fifth century.
RL98419. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 129 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Arles 321, LRBC I 329, SRCV IV 16310, Cohen VII 665,, Choice aEF, well centered, some silvering, flow lines, weight 3.10 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantia-Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, 328 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, pearl-diademed head right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), campgate with four turrets, open doors, star above, S - F flanking at sides, SCONST (Constantia) in exergue; $120.00 (98.40)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
The eldest son of Constantine the Great and co-emperor alongside his brothers Constantius II and Constans. The three brothers, after arranging the slaughter of most of the rest of their family by the army, gathered together in Pannonia on 9 September 337 and divided the Roman world among themselves. Constantine, proclaimed Augustus by the troops received Gaul, Britannia and Hispania. His attempt to exert his perceived rights of primogeniture led to his death in a failed invasion of Italy in 340 AD.
RL96881. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Rome 32 (S), LRBC I 602, SRCV V 17452, Cohen VII 233, Hunter V -, aVF, dark brown tone, tight flan, light earthen deposits, ragged edge, weight 1.230 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 9 Sep 337 - May 340 AD; obverse VIC CONSTANTINVS AVG, laurel and rosette diademed and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGVSTI (courage of the emperor), Emperor standing facing, bare head right, wearing military garb, spear in right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, R palm P in exergue; scarce; $110.00 (90.20)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.||centenionalis|
In 328 Arelatum was renamed Constantia in honor of Constantine II. After Constantine II was killed in 340, the name reverted to Arelate, only to be changed again in 354 to Constantia by Constantius II. It retained that name, although the mintmark 'AR' appeared on some of its coins even in the fifth century.
RL98421. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Arles 319, LRBC I 330, Depeyrot EMA 39/2, SRCV V 17224, Cohen VII 165, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, excellent centering, much silvering, weight 3.402 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Constantia-Arelatum (Arles, France) mint, as caesar, 328 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate, six rows of bricks, two turrets, no doors, star above, S - F across field and TCONST in exergue; $110.00 (90.20)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||follis|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RL96875. Billon follis, RIC VI Roma 196, Cohen VII 74, SRCV IV 15512, Hunter V -, aVF, porous, a little off center, weight 5.717 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, early autumn 307 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse CONSERVATORES VRB SVAE (Guardian of the city traditions), hexastyle temple, Roma seated facing within, head left, globe in right hand, scepter in left hand, R*Q in exergue; $100.00 (82.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
Soon after the Feast of Easter 337, Constantine fell seriously ill. He left Constantinople for the hot baths near his mother's city of Helenopolis. There, in a church his mother built in honor of Lucian the Apostle, he prayed, and there he realized that he was dying. He attempted to return to Constantinople, making it only as far as a suburb of Nicomedia. He summoned the bishops, and told them of his hope to be baptized in the River Jordan, where Christ was written to have been baptized. He requested the baptism right away, promising to live a more Christian life should he live through his illness. The bishops, Eusebius records, "performed the sacred ceremonies according to custom." It has been thought that Constantine put off baptism as long as he did so as to be absolved from as much of his sin as possible. Constantine died soon after at a suburban villa called Achyron, on 22 May 337.
RL96887. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Antioch 64 (S), LRBC I 1394, Cohen VII 314, SRCV -, Hunter V -, gF, encrustations, a little rough, weight 1.597 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, posthumous, 337 - 347 A.D.; obverse DV CONSTANTINVS P T AVGG (Divus Constantinus Pater Trium Augusti - Divine Constantine, father of the three emperors), veiled bust right; reverse IVST VEN MEM (Justa Veneranda Memoriae - righteous revered memories), Aequitas standing half left, head left, scales right hand, SMANZ in exergue; ex Trusted Coins; rare; $100.00 (82.00)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

|Constantine| |II|, |Constantine| |II,| |22| |May| |337| |-| |March| |or| |April| |340| |A.D.||centenionalis|
In 327, to address a shortage of labor, Constantine the Great decreed that rural slaves could only be sold in the province where they currently reside.
RL98695. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V 22 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 505, LRBC I 39, SRCV V 17217, Cohen VIII 165, aVF, well centered, darker fields with coppery high points, weight 3.774 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 110o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, as caesar, 327 - 328 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (to the foresight of the two princes), campgate with two turrets, star above, STRE in exergue; $100.00 (82.00)


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||centenionalis|
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa near Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RL97849. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Nicomedia 121, LRBC I 1094, SRCV IV 16258, Cohen VII 454, Hunter V 334 var. (4th officina), Choice VF, dark green patina with highlighting buff earthen deposits, weight 2.389 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 325 - 326 A.D.; obverse CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (to the foresight of the two emperors), campgate with two turrets, star above, MNA in exergue; from a Norwegian collection; $90.00 (73.80)




  







Catalog current as of Saturday, January 22, 2022.
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