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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Maximinus I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D.

Maximinus I was a giant of a man, and possessed of natural fighting ability. He rose through the ranks of the Roman army during the reign of Severus Alexander. After a successful governorship in Mesopotamia, he was sent to the Rhine frontier to oversee the regions army recruitment levies. In 235 A.D. he was proclaimed emperor by troops offended by Severus Alexander's peace loving character, and the galling fact that his mother, Julia Mamaea, was the true power in the empire. Maximinus campaigned with great success against the Germanic tribes, but his great cruelty towards the nobility whom he hated, and general ruthlessness inspired several rebellions, notably the failed Gordian rebellion and then the rebellion of Balbinus and Pupienus. Maximinus marched against the latter two, and during the abortive siege of Aquileia his troops deserted and murdered him.

Maximinus I Thrax, March 235 - May 238 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |March| |235| |-| |May| |238| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
In 237, King Ardashir I of Persia renewed his attacks on the Roman province of Mesopotamia.
RX94235. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 2585; Dattari 4590; Milne 3285; BMC Alexandria p. 231, 1803; Kampmann 65.67; Emmett 3328/4 (R3), Choice F, well centered, dark brown patina, weight 12.256 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 236 - 28 Aug 237 A.D.; obverse AVTO MAΞIMINOC EVC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust, seen from behind; reverse Nilus reclining left, lotus on head, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, cornucopia in left hand, reed in right hand, elbow resting on hippopotamus, date L∆ (year 4) left; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


|Maximinus| |I|, |Maximinus| |II| |Daia,| |Late| |309| |-| |30| |April| |313| |A.D.||follis|NEW
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POP ROM dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People.
RL94880. Billon follis, RIC VI Roma 294b, SRCV IV 14859A, Cohen VII 89, Hunter V -, VF/F, desert patina, a little off center on a broad flan, reverse weak and uneven, scratches, weight 3.655 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 312 - 313 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, R[...] in exergue; RIC VI lists as common but this is the first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 


|Maximinus| |I|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |Late| |May| |238| |A.D.||dupondius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation. While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health. Her name is the source of the word "hygiene."
SH34805. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC IV 65, Cohen IV 88, Hunter III 35, SRCV III -, VF, weight 13.826 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 235 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SALVS AVGVSTI (to the health of the Emperor), Salus seated left, left elbow resting on throne, with right holding patera and feeding snake coiled around altar, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce denomination for the reign and period; SOLD







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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

IMPMAXIMINVSPIVSAVG
MAXIMINVSPIVSAVGGERM


REFERENCES|

Alram, A. Die Münzprägung der Kaiser Maximinus I Thrax (235 / 238). (Wien, 1989).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 6: Severus Alexander to Pupienus. (London, 1963).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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