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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Nautical & Marine| ▸ |Ships||View Options:  |  |  |   

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins
Persian Empire, Samaria, c. 375 - 332 B.C.

|Persian| |Rule|, |Persian| |Empire,| |Samaria,| |c.| |375| |-| |332| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Samaria was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th - 8th centuries B.C. The Assyrians took the city and the northern kingdom in 722/721 B.C. The city did not recover until the Persian period, the mid 5th century. The tensions between the ruling Sanballat family and Jerusalem under the governorship of Nehemiah are documented in the Bible (Ezra 4:10, Neh 4:78). Samaria became Hellenistic in 332 B.C. Thousands of Macedonian soldiers were settled there following a revolt. The Judaean king John Hyrcanus destroyed Samaria in 108 B.C., but it was resettled under Alexander Jannaeus. In 63 B.C., Samaria was annexed to the Roman province of Syria. Herod the Great fortified the city and renamed it Sebaste. The ruins are located in the Samaria mountains almost 10 km to the northwest of Nablus.
JD97789. Silver hemiobol, Meshorer-Qedar 152, Sofaer -, Samaria Hoard -, Hendin -, SNG ANS -, HGC 10 -, aVF, dark toning in fields, scratches, obverse off center, weight 0.396 g, maximum diameter 7.5 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria (Sebastia, West Bank) mint, c. 375 - 332 B.C.; obverse Phoenician galley left, with partially furled sails over zigzag waves; reverse head of Bes facing, within a shaped incuse; very rare; $290.00 SALE PRICE $261.00 ON RESERVE


Phaselis, Lycia, c. 550 - 580 B.C.

|Lycia|, |Phaselis,| |Lycia,| |c.| |550| |-| |580| |B.C.||stater|
Phaselis was founded in 690 BC by settlers from the island of Rhodes. Later that same year, the great Rhodian seafarers also founded Gela, on the island of Sicily, thus extending their influence across the Greek world. The colony of Phaselis was the one purely Greek city in Lycia and differed in language, culture, and alphabet from the adjacent cities of the region. It should be noted that the coinage of Phaselis is among the earliest, if not the earliest, of all silver coinage struck in Asia Minor. Struck c. 530 B.C., this coin is roughly contemporary with the silver issues of King Kroisos of Lydia and represents the dawn of this medium of exchange in Asia Minor.
GA99010. Silver stater, cf. Heipp-Tamer series 3, emission 1b, 35; SNGvA 4392; Weber III -; SNG Cop -; SNG Delepierre -; BMC Lycia -, gF, tight thick flan, toned, marks, some porosity, test cut on rev., small edge crack, weight 11.054 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Phaselis (near Tekirova, Turkey) mint, c. 550 - 480 B.C.; obverse prow of galley left in the form of an abstract boar's head, with foreleg and large apotropaic eye, three round shields on gunwale; reverse incuse square punch with irregular subdivisions; $280.00 SALE PRICE $224.00


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The beginning and conclusion of Jesus' parable of the minas in the Gospel of Luke, chapter 19, may refer to Archelaus' journey to Rome.

A nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom and then return ... But his citizens hated him and sent a delegation after him, saying, "We do not want this man to reign over us." ... "But as for these enemies of mine," [said the nobleman,] "who did not want me to reign over them, bring them here and slaughter them before me." (Luke 19:12, 19:14, 19:27)
JD110306. Bronze prutah, Hendin 6226a (S); Meshorer TJC 71; RPC I 4915; BMC Palestine p. 231, 1, Choice VF, broad flan, green patina, earthen highlighting, sprue remnants, small edge split, weight 1.000 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 315o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω (Greek: of Herod), double cornucopia, adorned with grapes, horns parallel tops to right; reverse EΘN/[P?]A/HX (or similar, Greek: Ethnarch), war galley facing left with aphlaston, oars, and ram; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $220.00 SALE PRICE $176.00


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||obol|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS99758. Silver obol, Houghton-Lorber I 134.3; Newell ESM 60; HGC 9 61 (R3); BMC Seleucid p. 4, 42 var. (controls), SNG Spaer 137 var. (same), F, weight 0.541 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia ad Tigris (Baghdad Governorate, Iraq) mint, c. 295 - 280 B.C.; obverse tripod lebes with dome cover, wreath draped on tops of handles; reverse anchor with flukes upward, ring at both ends, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛEYKOY on left, monograms (controls) below flukes left and right; ex Jesus Vico auction 161 (21 Apr 2022), lot 160 (part of); very rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $160.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
The star symbolizes heaven. See Symbols| on Judean| Coins| in NumisWiki.
JD110317. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC K3, Sofaer 225, Hendin 6189, Hendin 6189, Meshorer TJC K, Meshorer AJC C, HGC 10 637, VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. edge beveled, weight 3.118 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse star of eight rays and central pellet surrounded by diadem, Paleo-Hebrew inscription "Yehonatan the king" between rays; reverse Greek legend: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (of King Alexander), upside-down anchor; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00 ON RESERVE


Herod Archelaus, Ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.

|Herod| |Archelaus|, |Herod| |Archelaus,| |Ethnarch| |of| |Samaria,| |Judea,| |and| |Idumea,| |4| |B.C.| |-| |6| |A.D.||prutah|NEW
The anchor was adopted from the Selukids, who used it to symbolize their naval strength. Anchors are often depicted upside down, as they would be seen hung on the side of a boat ready for use.
JD110305. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 69b; BMC Palestine p. 235, 39; Meshorer AJC II p. 239, 2b; Hendin 6224 (S); RPC I 4912, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, centered, edge a little ragged, casting sprue remnant, weight 1.306 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Jerusalem mint, 4 B.C. - 6 A.D.; obverse HPω∆OY (Greek: of Herod), anchor with long slender arms; reverse EΘ/AN (Greek abbreviation: Ethnarch) in two lines, surrounded by oak wreath; from an Israeli collection; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00 ON RESERVE


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
Herod's most famous and ambitious project was his magnificent expansion of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in 20 - 19 B.C. Although work on out-buildings continued another eighty years, the new Temple was finished in a year and a half. To comply with religious law, Herod employed 1,000 priests as masons and carpenters. The temple was destroyed in 70 A.D. Today, only the four retaining walls of the Temple Mount remain standing, including the Western Wall.
JD110309. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC 59a; SNG ANS 216; BMC Palestine p. 224, 40; HGC 10 660; Hendin 6219a var. (HPW BACI); Sofaer 30 var. (same), VF, very broad flan, green patina, sprue remnants, tiny edge cracks, weight 1.592 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem mint, c. 21 - 12 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆ BACI (Greek abbreviation: of King Herod), anchor; reverse double cornucopia, caduceus between horns, five pellets above; from an Israeli collection; $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, Phoenician silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, 4 coins, $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Judean Kingdom, Alexander Jannaeus (Yehonatan), 104 - 76 B.C.

|Alexander| |Jannaeus|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |Jannaeus| |(Yehonatan),| |104| |-| |76| |B.C.||prutah|NEW
The star symbolizes heaven. See Symbols| on Judean| Coins| in NumisWiki.
JD110316. Bronze prutah, Meshorer TJC K3, Sofaer 225, Hendin 6189, Hendin 6189, Meshorer TJC K, Meshorer AJC C, HGC 10 637, VF, weight 2.220 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 95 - 76 B.C.; obverse star of eight rays and central pellet surrounded by diadem, Paleo-Hebrew inscription "Yehonatan the king" between rays; reverse Greek legend: BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY (of King Alexander), upside-down anchor; $150.00 SALE PRICE $120.00 ON RESERVE


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

|Vespasian|, |Vespasian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.||as|
This type may commemorate a victory on the Sea of Galilee during the recapture of Judaea.
RB99987. Copper as, RIC II-1 336, BMCRE II 616, BnF III 595, Cohen I 632, Hunter I 119, SRCV I -, VF, green patina, porosity, scratches, weight 10.322 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 71 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA NAVALIS (the naval victory), Victory standing right on a galley prow, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00




  



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REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Mnzen der rmischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Rmisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

Catalog current as of Monday, November 28, 2022.
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