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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Nautical & Marine| ▸ |Ships||View Options:  |  |  | 

Galleys and Other Ships on Ancient Coins
Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Nicomedia, Bithynia

|Bithynia|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Nicomedia,| |Bithynia||AE| |26|
Nicomedia was the Roman metropolis of Bithynia. Diocletian made it the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis in 324. Constantine resided mainly in Nicomedia as his interim capital for the next six years, until in 330 when he declared nearby Byzantium (renamed Constantinople) the new capital. Constantine died in his royal villa near Nicomedia in 337. Due to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.
RP92638. Bronze AE 26, RPC IV.1 T9895 (1 spec.), Rec Gen 144(2), SNG Cop 568, SNGvA -, Corsten -, aVF, well centered, earthen highlights, porous, weight 10.629 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 30o, Nikomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse A K M AV KO ANTΩNI, laureate head right; reverse MHT NEΩ NEIKOMH∆, Athena standing left, wearing crested helmet, small galley in extended right hand, grounded vertical spear and round shield in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection, this is the second known and finest know specimen of the type; extremely rare; $500.00 (€410.00)
 


Lot of 4 Silver Fractions From Phoenicia, c. 425 - 300 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Lot| |of| |4| |Silver| |Fractions| |From| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |425| |-| |300| |B.C.||Lot|
 
GA97055. Silver Lot, 4 silver fractions, c. 0.6g - 0.8g, c. 9mm, $180.00 (€147.60)
 


Lot of 26 Roman Republican Ases, c. 189 - 90 B.C.

|Roman| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Lot| |of| |26| |Roman| |Republican| |Ases,| |c.| |189| |-| |90| |B.C.||Lot|
 
LT96181. Bronze Lot, 26 Roman Republic Bronze Coins, c. 31mm, c. 24g, Fair to Good, obverse janiform head, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above or before; unattributed to type, no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $150.00 (€123.00)
 


Roman Republic, Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, Eldest Son of Pompey the Great, Executed in 45 B.C.

|Pompeians|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Gnaeus| |Pompey| |Junior,| |Imperator,| |Eldest| |Son| |of| |Pompey| |the| |Great,| |Executed| |in| |45| |B.C.||as|
After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR97393. Bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, Russo RBW, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF/F, dark patina, red earthen deposits, porous, scratches, broken - 1/5 missing, weight 17.973 g, maximum diameter 31.8 mm, die axis 270o, Hispania, Cordoba mint, summer 46 - spring 45 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, I (mark of value) right, IMP below (off flan); ex Soler y Llach (Barcelona); $130.00 (€106.60)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous, Second Punic War, 211 - 206 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous,| |Second| |Punic| |War,| |211| |-| |206| |B.C.||as|
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $115.00 (€94.30)
 


Roman Republic, Matienus, c. 179 - 170 B.C.

|before| |150| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Matienus,| |c.| |179| |-| |170| |B.C.||quadrans|
In 178 B.C., the praetor Lucius Postumius Albinus celebrated a triumph in Rome after conquering the Vaccaei and Lusitani during his time as Roman commander in the province of Hispania Ulterior.
RR93754. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 162/6b, Sydenham 321g, BMCRR Italy 410, Russo RBW 717, SRCV I 1096, VF, rough from corrosion, edge cracks, pre-strike casting seam, squared flan resulting from cuts to remove pre-stike casting sprues, weight 7.276 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 179 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets (mark of value, 3 uncia) behind; reverse prow of a galley right, ROMA above, MAT ligature right, three pellets (mark of value, 3 uncia) below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $100.00 (€82.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |15|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY93776. Bronze AE 15, Houghton Lorber 2378(1), Babelon Rois 1509, SNG Spaer 2721, BMC Seleucid 32 - 34, VF, well centered, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, light corrosion, weight 2.202 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain N. Syria, Phoenicia, or Coele Syria mint, 135 - 95 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse prow right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines above, ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $100.00 (€82.00)
 


Arados, Phoenicia, c. 240 - 237 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Arados,| |Phoenicia,| |c.| |240| |-| |237| |B.C.||AE| |16|
In 259 B.C. Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Aradus, to which the subsequent coins of the city are dated. Arados was not completely independent, however, the Seleukids retained overlordship.
GB93618. Bronze AE 16, Duyrat 1374 - 1403; BMC Phoenicia p. 13, 88 - 90; Lindgren III 1334; HGC 10 86 (S); SNG Cop -, VF, nice glossy black patina with red earthen highlighting, obverse edge beveled, tiny edge split, weight 4.102 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 240 - 237 B.C.; obverse turreted bust of Tyche right; reverse prow of war galley left with figurehead of Athena Promachos fighting left, no date, (AP monogram) above; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous (Unofficial?), c. 91 B.C.

|99-50| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Anonymous| |(Unofficial?),| |c.| |91| |B.C.||quadrans|
Russo suspects this type may be unofficial because, despite the attractive style, the prow does not include the usual features found on most coins of the period.
RR88352. Copper quadrans, Russo RBW 1244 (unofficial?), Crawford 339/4a, Sydenham 679c, BMCRR Rome 2208, SRCV I 1195, VF, porous, rough, edge splits, weight 2.114 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, apotropaic on side, ROMA above, three pellets below; $75.00 (€61.50)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306 - 283 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Demetrios| |I| |Poliorketes,| |306| |-| |283| |B.C.||AE| |13|
Demetrius I Poliorketes (The Besieger), son of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, was given the title king by his father in 306 B.C. after he defeated Ptolemy I at the Battle of Salamis. In 294 he seized the throne of Macedonia by murdering Alexander V. The combined forces of Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, forced him out of Macedonia in 288. Abandoned by his troops on the field of battle he surrendered to Seleucus in 286 and died in captivity in 283 B.C.
GB93465. Bronze AE 13, cf. HGC 3 1031 (R2), Newell 62 corr. (says monogram on left in error), SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, F, green patina, corrosion and scattered pits, weight 2.115 g, maximum diameter 12.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain western Anatolian mint, c. 298 - 295 B.C.; obverse prow of war galley left, Athena on deck standing left blowing trumpet and holding stylis; reverse Poseidon Pelagaios standing left, brandishing trident with right hand, nude but for chlamys draped over extended left arm, control monogram right(?), B - A low across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $70.00 (€57.40)
 







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REFERENCES

Schaaff, Ulrich. Münzen der römischen Kaiserzeit mit Schiffsdarstellungen im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum. (Munich, 2003).

Catalog current as of Monday, June 21, 2021.
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