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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Nerva||View Options:  |  |  | 

Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D.

Nerva was an elderly senator when, after the death of emperor Domitian in 96 A.D, the senate asked him to be emperor. Although popular with the senate and the people of Rome, he was not appreciated by the Army. To placate them he raised the great general Trajan to the rank of Caesar in late October 97 A.D. He died on 25 January 98 A.D.

|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||sestertius|
The fiscus Iudaicus was an annual tax imposed on Jews after the destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple. The amount was two denarii, equivalent to the one-half of a shekel Jews had previously paid to the Temple of Jerusalem. The tax applied to Jews throughout the empire and, while the tax paid for the Temple of Jerusalem was payable only by adult men between the ages of 20 and 50, the fiscus Iudaicus was imposed on all Jews, including women, children, the elderly, and even Jewish slaves. To add to the humiliation, the tax went to the pagan Temple of Capitoline Jupiter in Rome. Domitian strictly enforced the tax on those who attempted to concealed their identity to avoid the tax. Suetonius relates that an old man of 90 was stripped to see whether he was circumcised and therefore Jewish. This coin commemorates the fisci Iudaici calumnia sublata (abolition of malicious prosecution in connection with the Jewish tax) reforms eliminating the harsh policies of Domitian, but not the tax. It is not known when the tax was formally abolished. Some historians credit the emperor Julian with its abolition in about 361 or 362.
SL111602. Orichalcum sestertius, Hendin 6634b (R), RIC II 82 (S), BMCRE III 105, BnF III 97, Hunter I 45, Cohen II 57, NGC Ch F, 4/5, 1/5 (6155649-001), weight 23.27 g, maximum diameter 34 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FISCI IVDAICI CALVMNIA SVBLATA, date palm tree (symbol of Judaea), S - C (senatus consulto) across field; ex CNG e-auction 487 (10 Mar 2021), 530; ex Gorny auction 267 (17 Oct 2019), 3624; ex Shlomo Moussaieff Collection (London, acquired between 1948 and 1980s); NGC| Lookup; rare; $520.00 SALE PRICE $468.00


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RY111785. Bronze as, McAlee 421(d); RPC Online III 3482; Butcher CRS 187; SNG Hunterian II 2907; BMC Galatia, p. 182, 261; Wruck 129, aVF, nice portrait green patina, some roughness, slightly off center, weight 12.763 g, maximum diameter 29.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR NERVA AVG III COS, laureate head right; reverse large S C, small Δ (4th officina) below, all within laurel wreath with eight bunches of leaves; ex CNG e-auction 510 (23 Feb 2022), lot 460; ex Dr. Jay M. Galst Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||sestertius|
Nerva maintained that he had liberated Rome from the tyranny of Domitian and restored a constitutionally-based regime. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. and many Mexican coins.
SH94036. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 86, BMCRE III 112, BnF III 100, Cohen II 114, SRCV II 3050, Hunter I -, Choice gVF, well centered, nice portrait, mottled patina, scattered tiny pits, weight 19.627 g, maximum diameter 34.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Sep 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS PVBLICA (freedom of the people), Libertas standing left, pileus liberatis (freedom cap) in right hand, staff in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; SOLD


|Nerva|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.||sestertius|
In 97 A.D., the future emperor Trajan was made governor in Germania and adopted as "Caesar" or heir by Nerva.
SH46865. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 98, BMCRE III 134, BnF III 119, Cohen II 72, SRCV II 3045, Hunter I -, gVF, nice portrait, areas of light corrosion, weight 20.781 g, maximum diameter 32.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 18 Sep - Dec 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P II COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNA AVGVST (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVVSAVGVSTVS
IMPNERVACAESAVGGERMPMTRPII
IMPNERVACAESAVGGERMPMTRPOTPPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIDESIGNIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPCOSIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPIICOSIIIPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOT
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOTPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPOTII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPP
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPMTRPPPCOSIIII
IMPNERVACAESAVGPONTMAXTR


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayn, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 2: Nerva to Antoninus Pius. (Paris, 1883).
Giard, J. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulvement de 68 aprs J.-C. a Nerva. Bibliothque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. (London, 1936).
Mattingly H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II: Vespasian to Hadrian. (London, 1926).
McAlee, R. The Coins of Roman Antioch. (Lancaster, PA, 2007).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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