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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman AntiquitiesView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Antiquities

Roman, Syro-Palestinian (Samaria?), Snake-Thread Flask, Late 2nd - Early 4th Century A.D.

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Snake-thread ornamentation originated in the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire in the second half of the second century and its popularity peaked in the first half of the third century. Snake-thread decoration was revived in the second half of the fourth century in the east and in the west near Cologne in modern Germany. Serpentine form trails may vary in thickness, may be the same color as the vessel (usually colorless) or brightly colored (common in the West). Ontario Museum 309, with similar subtle snake-thread ornamentation, is attributed to Samaria, 3rd to early 4th century A.D.
AG63814. Snake thread flask, cf. Ontario Museum 309 (for similar ornamentation), 12.4 mm (4 7/8"), Complete and intact, funnel mouth with rolled rim, cylindrical neck, bulbous body, snake-thread ornamentation on the body, flat bottom; from a Florida dealer; $970.00 (824.50)


Roman Bronze Vessel Handle, Ornamented With Bacchus and a Panther, c. 1st Century A.D.

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The Panther was the companion of Bacchus. The grapevine and its wild barren alter-ego, the toxic ivy plant, were both sacred to him. This handle was once attached to vessel used for serving or drinking wine.
AI30971. height 8.0 cm (3"), excellent condition with a nice green patina, bronze vessel handle ornamented with a facing young head of Bacchus wearing an ivy wreath in his long flowing hair, panther skin tied at neck, the curving handle ends with a panther head; $540.00 (459.00)


Roman, Bronze Repousse Plaque with Centaur Holding a Bow, Lorica Sqaumata Armor Plate(?), c. 1st - 3rd Century B.C.

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Likely used in some legionary application; perhaps as a lorica squamata legionary armor plate segment.
AA59779. Roman, bronze repousse, 1.75 x 1.75 inches, c. 1st - 3rd century A.D.; sheet bronze hammered from behind in repousse technique to raise the figure of a centaur holding a bow, remains of two rivet holes where it was attached, tear on body, rare and interesting; from a New Jersey collection; $520.00 (442.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Sprinkler Jug, c. 3rd A.D.

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This form is missing from the major references but we know of other examples from the market.
AG63811. Sprinkler jug, 10.5 mm (4 1/8"), complete, tiny chip in handle (visible in photo), possibly a small rim repair or just flaked weathering, thick yellowish brown enamel-like weathering, free-blow, yellow-green glass, piriform body, tubular neck, slight funnel mouth, washer-like constriction at the base of neck, handle attached below rim and below neck, kicked bottom with pontil mark; from a Florida dealer; $460.00 (391.00)


Roman, Bronze Patera Handle, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

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A patera was a plate used by Roman priests to make sacrificial offerings to the Gods. Paterae were thin and most often have been lost to corrosion leaving only the handle remaining.
AL59776. Roman, bronze patera handle, c. 1st - 3rd century A.D., 5.6", heavy fluted handle terminating in a collar from which a ram's head with curled horns emerges; from a New Jersey collection; rare; $450.00 (382.50)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Fusiform Unguentarium with Iridescence, c. 3rd - 5th Century A.D.

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Hayes' Ontario Museum catalog references many similar specimens, noting some are from Beirut. Our example is finer than most examples of similar form, many of which appear to be carelessly made. Hayes' dates the type 5th century or later. Perhaps the finer form indicates ours is earlier.
AG63806. Fusiform unguentarium, cf. Ontario Museum 461, complete, intact, much iridescence; 16.5 cm, spindle-shaped long tubular body, upper half is a neck narrowing slightly to folded and flattened rim, small shoulder at center, lower half is a narrow tubular body narrowing to a rounded point; from a Florida dealer; $420.00 (357.00)


Roman, Glass Double Balsamarium, 4th Century A.D.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years. Ex Robert Hass collection.

This contain was designed to hold two different cosmetics, probably eyeliner and eyeshadow.
AG32584. Double balsamarium, cf. Wolkenburg Collection 79, Ontario Museum 359 (no pinched projections), Carnegie Museum 197 (same), Choice, 12 cm (4 3/4"), clear aquamarine, double tube made by folding single tube, two snake-like handles attached at body on large blob with pinched projection snake tails, slighly flaring vessel mouths, rim folded in with no lip, some cracks; $350.00 (297.50)


Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Glass Bottle, c. 3rd Century A.D.

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AG63812. Glass bottle, cf. Ontario Museum 150; 8.3 cm (3 1/4") tall, complete, crack down from rim, toes chipped (will not stand), free-blown, pale green glass, fire rounded rim with projecting roll below, long neck narrowing slightly to bulbous body, base ring of pinched toes, stand not included; from a Florida dealer; $280.00 (238.00)


Roman, Large Iron Borer or File, 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

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Another piece from the same group as this borer was dated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to 120 A.D. with a probable range of 80 A.D. - 160 A.D. Testing was done using an innovative technique which measures the carbon isotope ratio of the trace carbon in the iron. This carbon comes from the wood used in the production of the iron which must be of essentially the same age as the tool itself. Results were published in the journal, Radiocarbon, Summer 2001.
AE61804. Roman borer, cf. Petrie, 'Tools and Weapons', pl. LXV, 40; 7 inches, indent at one end for attaching handle, $150.00 (127.50)


Roman, Bronze Bird Fibula, c. 3rd - 5th Century A.D.

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AS61829. Roman fibula; cf. Hattatt BOA 1156 - 1159; 1.25 inches, pin missing; from a New Jersey collection, c. 3rd - 5th century A.D.; $150.00 (127.50)




  



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Catalog current as of Saturday, November 17, 2018.
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Roman Antiquities