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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ Celtic TribesView Options:  |  |  |   

Celtic Tribes in Thrace

Eastern Celts, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Eingesetztem Pferdefuß" Type, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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The type "Eingesetztem Pferdefuß" literally translates "with inserted cloven hoof."
CE77589. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 413 (same dies); cf. Göbl OTA 122/2 (for obverse) and Göbl OTA 122/3 (for reverse), aVF, obverse off-center, uneven strike, marks and scratches, weight 10.665 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse stylized laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse stylized helmeted horseman riding left; cloven hoof above the horse's head; on left: round floral design with pellet in oval in center with many small pellet petals around; below: wheel with five spokes and five pellets between the spokes; rare; $400.00 (€340.00)
 


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87187. Bronze Ring Money, 4 bronze rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) Victoor VIII-23 & VIII-24 (smaller and cruder), Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, gear-wheel type ring with eight spokes and 24 teeth, 34.995g, 54mm, very large and extremely rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.981g, c. 27mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, two rings interlocked, each with 3 groups of 2 globules, 8.914g, c. 28mm each; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87188. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 8 sets of 3 knobs, asymmetric, 60.234g, 70mm, very large, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 104 - 105, XVII, three-blade propeller type ring, 1.514g, 32mm; (2x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, c. 3.4g, c. 26mm each; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, 3 globules, 1.630g, c. 20mm; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87189. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 10 sets of 3 knobs, symmetric, 56.833g, 84mm, very large, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 93, XII.0, cylindrical ring with three rings of knobs, 5.202g, 19mm diameter, 8mm long; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 92, XI.0, ring with 7 large knobs, 9.870g, 26mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.184g, 24mm; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Six Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87183. Bronze Ring Money, 6 bronze rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, symmetric, well formed, (1x) cf. Victoor IX-2b, Topalov Apollonia p. 109, XIX.0, wheel ring with four spokes, 10.442g, 31mm; (2x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, c. 3.9g, c. 26mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, two rings interlocked, each with 3 groups of 2 globules, 8.064g, c. 29mm each; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, 3 globules, 3.780g, c. 22mm; $230.00 (€195.50)
 


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

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Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87184. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, Choice VF, nice patinas, all symmetric, well formed, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 88, III.0, 12 knobs, 19.512g, 60mm, very large and very rare; (3x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each c. 3.0g, c. 25mm; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VII.0, small 3 globules, 1.167g, c. 19.5mm; $220.00 (€187.00)
 


Five Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87185. Bronze Ring Money, 5 rings, VF, nice patinas, symmetric, well formed, (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, 4 knobs each ornamented with two nubs, 40.934g, 62mm, Very large and extremely rare; (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, triangular with each vertex ornamented with a knob trigon, 7.583g, 19mm, extremely rare; (3x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each c. 3.8g, c. 26mm; $220.00 (€187.00)
 


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87186. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, VF, nice patinas, some chipping on nubs of large ring, asymmetrical - varying thickness, not all knobs and nubs evenly spaced, (1x) Victoor -, Topalov Apollonia -, Burgos -, 4 knobs each ornamented with three nubs, 31.858g, 64mm, very large and extremely rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia p. 93, XII.0, small cylindrical ring with three rings of knobs, 8.746g, 15mm diameter, 13mm long, scarce; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, 3.073g, 26mm; (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia I p. 90, VIII.0 (all symmetrical), 4 globules unevenly spaced, 3.725g, 22mm; $220.00 (€187.00)
 


Four Rings, Celtic Ring Money, Black Sea Region, c. 800 - 100 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ring money of bronze, of silver, and of gold was used by the Celts in trade from Ireland to the Danube region. The dating of Celtic ring money is uncertain. Some authorities date the use of ring money from 800 to 500 B.C., but it may have been used as late as 100 B.C. Some believe the bronze rings are actually just strap fittings, not a trade currency. Undoubtedly they were used as fittings. Others claim, however, that although the rings vary in weight; they are all multiples of a standard unit, indicating a uniform principle regulated their size - i.e., their use as coinage. Bronze rings have been found in quite large hoards, which also strongly indicates they were used as money.
LT87190. Bronze Ring Money, 4 rings, VF, nice patinas, (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia p. 89, VI.0 (many more knobs), 4 knobs, 54.514g, 82mm, very large and rare; (1x) Topalov Apollonia I p. 95, V.0, 3 groups of 2 globules, each 4.683g, c. 26mm; (1x) cf. Victoor VI (many variations none too similar to this) ring with a floral or gear appearance, 14 pedals/teeth, 15.720g, 29mm; (1x) cf. Topalov Apollonia p. 90, VII.0 (normal, round with three knobs), small ring with 3 knobs forming a Reuleaux triangle, 2.328g, 21mm; $220.00 (€187.00)
 


Pannonian Celts, Syrmia Region, Kugelwange (Ball Cheek) Type, c. 2nd Century B.C.

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This type normally has a prominent raised round (ball) cheek, but on this example the cheek is less prominent than most.

Syrmia is a fertile region of the Pannonian Plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. Today, it is divided between Serbia in the east and Croatia in the west.
CE76349. Bronze tetradrachm, cf. Göbl OTA 197, Lanz 465; derived from the Macedonian Kingdom tetradrachms of Philip II, VF, tight flan, porous, weight 6.239 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 270o, Syrmia mint, c. 2nd century B.C.; obverse devolved laureate head of Zeus right, hair in arcs on both sides of central point, broad laurel wreath; reverse devolved horse trotting left, pellet in circle above; $215.00 (€182.75)
 




  



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REFERENCES

Allen, D. Catalogue of Celtic Coins in the British Museum, Vol. 1: Silver Coins of the East Celts and Balkan Peoples. (London, 1987).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006).
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info.
Dembski, G. Münzen der Kelten. Sammlungskataloge des Kunsthistorischen Museums. (Vienna, 1998).
Göbl, R. Ostkeltischer Typen Atlas. (Braunschweig, 1973).
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Kostial, M. Kelten im Osten. Gold und Silber der Kelten in Mittel und Osteuropa. Sammlung Lanz. (München, 1997).
Pick, B. Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. I/I. (Berlin, 1898).
Pink, K. Münzprägung der Ostkelten und Ihrer Nachbarn. (Harrassowitz, 1939).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Sunday, September 23, 2018.
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Celts in Thrace