Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 6 June!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities 10% Off Store-Wide Sale Until 6 June!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
New & Reduced


Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Pisidia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Greek Coins from Pisidia

Pisidia included the mountainous country between Phrygia and the north of Pamphylia and north-east of Lycia. Uncivilized in early times, only Selge struck money before the time of Alexander the Great. Alexander the Great conquered Sagalassos on his way to Persia, but Termessos defied him. After Alexander died, the region was ruled by Antigonus Monophthalmus, and possibly Lysimachus of Thrace, after which Seleucus I took control. The Seleukids founded colonies at strategically important places and the local people were Hellenised, but the area was contested by the Attalids of Pergamon and invading Galatian Celts. Through the Treaty of Apamea, Pisidia officially passed to the Attalids in 188 BC. Attalos III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed his kingdom to Rome in 133 B.C. Rome gave Pisidia to the Kingdom of Cappadocia, but the Pisidians allied with pirate-dominated Cilicia and Pamphylia. Roman rule was restored in 102 B.C. In 39 B.C. Mark Antony bestowed Pisidia upon Amyntas, king of Galatia, who held it until his death in 25 B.C. Pisidia was then made part of the new province of Galatia. In 6 B.C., Augustus founded a line of colonies, Antiocheia, Olbasa, Cremna, and Comama.

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Cremna, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Cremna,| |Pisidia||AE| |29|
Cremna in Pisidia was taken by Amyntas, commander of the Galatian auxiliary of Brutus and Cassius. He became king of Galatia and Pisidia after going over to the side of Mark Antony. After his death in 25 B.C., Cremna became a Roman colony. A donatio given by Aurelian promised a period of great prosperity; but in 276 the town was taken by an Isaurian robber, named Lydius. He used it as a base for looting, prompting Tacitus to make the first and only visit of a Roman emperor to the region. Cremna was abandoned in the Middle Ages. The ancient site stands on a hill over the ancient Cestrus (Aksu) River, in Burdur Province, Turkey. Nearly all the buildings have been reduced to heaps of stone.
RP98458. Bronze AE 29, unpublished in major references; BMC Lycia -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, SNG BnF -, Isegrim -, F, legends weak, edge cracks, weight 8.841 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, Cremna (in Bucak district, Turkey) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse [IMP C L SEP?] SEVER - PERTIN AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL C-REM - AVG, Aquila (legionary eagle standard) between two signa standards surmounted by wreath; from the Michael Arslan Collection; Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; extremely rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Isinda, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Isinda,| |Pisidia||assarion|
Isinda stood in a strategic position at the western end of the pass leading from Pamphylia by Termessus to Pisidia. The coinage of Isinda indicates the city considered itself an Ionian colony.
RP97734. Bronze assarion, SNG BnF 1622; SNG Pfalz 234; BMC Lycia p. 227, 21; SNG Hunterian -; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -, aVF, dark brown patina, weight 8.444 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Isinda (Kisla, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AK ΠΛ OVAΛEPIANON CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ICIN-∆-EΩN, mother goddess seated right on a high backed throne, holding swaddled infant on her lap, coiled serpent rising up before her; ex Numismatica Ars Classica Auction 100 (29 May 2017), lot 1320; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D. Pisidia, Antiochia

|Pisidia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.| |Pisidia,| |Antiochia||AE| |20|
Antiochia in Pisidia, also know as Antiochia in Phrygia, and under the Roman Empire as Antiochia Caesareia or Antiochia Colonia Caesarea, was on the border of Pisidia and Phrygia, at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aegean and Central Anatolian regions.
RP98025. Bronze AE 20, Krzyzanowska 139, pl. 4 (dies not listed); RPC IV.3 T7338; BMC Lycia p. 177, 9; SNG BnF 1087; SNGvA 4922; SNG Righetti 1328, VF, well centered, highlighting desert patina, flow lines, light crackling corrosion, strike slightly weak, weight 3.381 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antiochia (near Yalva, Turkey) mint, as caesar, c. 160 A.D.; obverse CAESAR AVRELIVS, bare head right; reverse ANTIOCHEAE COLONIAE, eagle standing half right, head right, wings displayed; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |22|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP93151. Bronze AE 22, Krzyzanowska XVII/-; SNG BnF 1127 var. (same obv. die, rev. leg. var.); SNG PfPs 47 var. (same); BMC Lycia p. 181, 34 var. (rev. leg.), VF, dark green patina, minor earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 6.118 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, chignon at back of head; reverse ANTIOCH GEN CL CA, Tyche (Genius of the colony) standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, wearing long chiton and peplos, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Titus and Domitian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Claudiolaodicea Combusta, Lycaonia

|Lycaonia|, |Titus| |and| |Domitian,| |1| |July| |69| |-| |24| |June| |79| |A.D.,| |Claudiolaodicea| |Combusta,| |Lycaonia||AE| |19|
Claudiolaodicea, founded by Seleucus I Nicator, was one of five cities he named after his mother Laodice. Restored by Claudius in the 1st century A.D., it was renamed Claudiolaodicea in his honor. Its Latin epithet Combusta indicates it was once destroyed by fire. Located northwest of Iconium (now Konya), on the high road from the west coast to Melitene on the Euphrates, it is now Ladik, Konya Province, Turkey. Some ancient authors describe it as located in Lycaonia, others in Pisidia, and Ptolemy places it in Galatia. This discrepancy is easily explained because these territories were often extended or reduced and the city was likely in each of them at one time. The few imperial coins of Claudiolaodicea all belong to the reigns of Titus and Domitian.
RP97865. Bronze AE 19, SNGvA 152 (same dies), RPC Online II 1613 (14 spec.), vA Lykien 151 - 153, SNG BnF 2322, Waddington 4779, F, earthen adhesions, weight 6.794 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea Catacecaumene (Ladik, Turkey) mint, as caesars under Vespasian, 69 - 79 A.D.; obverse TITOC KAI ∆OMITIANOC KAICAPEC, confronted bare heads Titus (on left) and Domitian; reverse KΛAY∆IOΛAO∆IKEWN, Cybele seated left on high-backed throne, kalathos on head, patera in right hand, resting left arm on tympanum, lion couchant left on near side of throne; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86924. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, gF, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.363 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Pappa Tiberiopolis, Pisidia

|Antoninus| |Pius|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Pappa| |Tiberiopolis,| |Pisidia||AE| |23|
Pappa Tiberiopolis, formerly Pappa, in the Roman province of Phrygia Pacatiana, was mentioned by Ptolemy, Socrates of Constantinople, and Hierocles. At various times, it was considered as part of Phrygia, Isauria, and the late Roman province of Pisidia. It struck its own coins from the time of Trajan. Today it is the village of Yunuslar, Beysehir district, in Konya Province, Turkey. The famous Roman sarcophagus showing the Twelve Labors of Hercules now displayed at the Konya Archaeological Museum was recovered at Tiberiopolis.Sanctuary
RP97768. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online IV.3 T7694; vA Pisidia I 1149; SNG BnF 1666; SNG Cop 176; SNG Righetti 1411; SNG Pflzer 287; Waddington 3778; BMC Pisidia p. 233, 1, F, well centered, dark patina, porosity, scratches, weight 6.396 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Pappa Tiberiopolis (Yunuslar, Turkey) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI A∆P - ANTONINOC, laureate head right; reverse TIBEPIEΩN ΠAΠΠHNΩN, Mn standing slightly right, right foot on bucranium, wearing Phrygian cap, long scepter vertical in left hand, pine cone in right hand, crescent behind his shoulders; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |20|
Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13-52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP97495. Bronze AE 20, SNG BnF 1323 (same obv. die), Krzyzanowska -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lycia -, VF, brown tone with brassy high points, well centered but tight flan cuts of parts of the obverse legend, weight 3.348 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, Aug 253 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse IMP CA GALLIHNVS PIVS R, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANTI-OCHI CL, vexillum topped with eagle, flanked by two legionary standards, · S R (Senatus Romanum) in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86922. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, blue green patina, struck with a slightly damaged obverse die, reverse off center, earthen deposits, weight 2.570 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 180o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86928. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Pisidia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, dark blue-green patina, die wear, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.092 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $55.00 SALE PRICE $49.50




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. La collection Waddington au cabinet des mdailles. RN. (1897-1898).
Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 2. (London, 1929).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. III: Asia Minor, Farther Asia, Egypt, Africa. (Cambridge, 1929).
Hill, G. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Lycia, Pamphylia, and Pisidia. (London, 1897).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Mnzen, Vol. II. (Vienna, 1902).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermnzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milan, 1999).
Krzyzanowska, A. Monnaies Coloniales de Antioche de Pisidie. (Warsaw, 1970).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Martini, R. Monetazione provinciale romana II: Collezione Winsemann Falghera. Glaux 8. (Milan, 1992).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 6: Phrygia to Cilicia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland: Pflzer Privatsammlungen. Part 5: Pisidien und Lykaonien. (Munich, 1999).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Mnzsammlung Universitt Tbingen, |Part 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Rmische Provinzprgungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock. Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia... (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Cabinet des Mdailles, Bibliothque Nationale. Vol. 3: Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, Galatia. (Paris, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 6: Burdur Museum, Vol. 1: Pisidia, Part 1: Adada - Prostanna. (Istanbul, 2011).
von Aulock, H. "Kleinasiatische Mnzsttten, VI: Die rmische Kolonie Komama in Pisidien" in JNG XX (1970).
von Aulock, H. Mnzen und Stdte Pisidiens. (Tbingen, 1977).

Catalog current as of Thursday, May 26, 2022.
Page created in 1.306 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity