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Macedonian Kingdom, Nikokreon, King of Salamis, Cyprus, c. 331 - 310 B.C., Alexander the Great Lifetime Issue

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Nikokreon,| |King| |of| |Salamis,| |Cyprus,| |c.| |331| |-| |310| |B.C.,| |Alexander| |the| |Great| |Lifetime| |Issue||obol|NEW
Struck in the name of Alexander the Great, by Nikokreon, King of Salamis. Nikokreon succeeded his father, Pnytagoras, who had submitted to Alexander and personally participated in the siege of Tyre. Nikokreon visited Alexander at Tyre where he distinguished himself by furnishing magnificence theatrical exhibitions for the Emperor. After Alexander's death Nikokreon allied with Ptolemy against Antigonus and was rewarded by being placed in control of all Cyprus. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most coins struck in the name of Alexander were issued after his death.
GS110001. Silver obol, apparently unpublished, cf. Price 3141 (hemidrachm), VF, toned, reverse off center, reverse die wear, scattered porosity, light etching, weight 0.625 g, maximum diameter 9.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Salamis mint, Alexander lifetime issue, c. 331 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated to left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot forward (lifetime style), eagle right in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, strung bow left (control symbol) in left field, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Roma e-auction 98 (16 Jun 2022), lot 173; ex inventory of a UK dealer; this is the only specimen of this obol type known to FORVM; extremely rare; $350.00 (364.00)


Mytilene, Lesbos, 188 - 170 B.C., In the Name Alexander the Great

|Lesbos|, |Mytilene,| |Lesbos,| |188| |-| |170| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|NEW
Mytilene was initially confined to a small island, that was later joined to Lesbos. After defeating a Mytilene revolt in 428 B.C., the Athenian public assembly voted to massacre all the men and to sell the women and children into slavery. When it changed its mind the next day, a fast trireme sailed the 186 nautical miles (344 km) in less than a day and prevented the massacre. Her most famous residents were the poets Sappho and Alcaeus, the statesman Pittacus (one of the Seven Sages of ancient Greece), and Aristotle, who lived in Mytilene for two years. The Romans, among whom was a young Julius Caesar, successfully besieged Mytilene in 80 B.C. In 56 A.D., Paul the Apostle stopped there on the return trip of his third missionary journey (Acts 20:14).
GS110111. Silver tetradrachm, unpublished variant, Price 1733 var. (ivy leaf vice aphlaston under throne), Mller Alexander -, Hersh -, SNG Greece -, SNG Cop -, VF, toned, scratches and marks, hammered flan, weight 16.151 g, maximum diameter 33.8 mm, die axis 0o, Mytilene mint, c. 188 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, two pilei over ∆Ψ monogram over chelys (lyre) lower left, aphlaston below throne; from the Shawn Caza Collection, ex Dorotheum (Vienna, Austria); zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Pupienus, 22 April - 29 July 238 A.D., Tarsus, Cilicia

|Pupienus|, |Pupienus,| |22| |April| |-| |29| |July| |238| |A.D.,| |Tarsus,| |Cilicia||hexassarion|NEW
The inscription A M K Γ Γ is a boast of this city, Πρωτη Mεγιστη Kαλλιστη, meaning First (A is the Greek number one), Greatest, and Most Beautiful of the three (Γ is the Greek number three) adjoining provinces (Cilicia, Isauria, Lycaonia). The final Γ (Γ is the Greek number three) indicates the city held three neokorie, temples dedicated to the imperial cult.

This coin was struck on an unstable and likely poorly mixed leaded bronze alloy. The pits, where the copper has corroded away, are filled with lead.
RP110025. Leaded bronze hexassarion, RPC Online VII-2 2982 (12 spec.); SNG BnF 1637; SNG Levante 1112; SNG Tahberer I 1560; BMC Lycaonia p. 210, 245; Waddington 4665, aF, centered on a broad flan, pitting, weight 22.945 g, maximum diameter 36.6 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 22 Apr - 29 Jul 238 A.D.; obverse AYT KAIC M KLW∆ ΠOYΠIHNON CEB, laureate, draped, cuirassed, bearded, bust right, Π - Π across field; reverse TAPCOY MHTPOΛEΩC, Perseus standing slightly, head left, nude but for boots and chlamys over shoulders and left arm, head of Medusa in right hand down at side, harpa in left hand, A/K-M/B/Γ in fields; budget specimen of this big 36.6mm rare emperor's bronze!; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Struck shortly after Alexander's death during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. Kolophon also struck coins during this period in the name of Philip. Traditionally coins naming Alexander have been attributed to Alexander III the Great, but undoubtedly the Alexander named on this coin was the infant son of Roxana, Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia, and in 317 B.C. he was executed under orders from Olympias. Olympias was Alexander the Great's mother and Alexander IV's grandmother, but not Philip III's mother. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed by the boy's regent, Kassander, in 311 B.C. The ruins of Kolophon are south of the town Degirmendere Fev in the Menderes district of Izmir Province, Turkey.
GS98704. Silver drachm, Price 1750, Mller Alexander 313, HGC 3.1 944c, SNG Cop -, aVF, bumps and scratches, tight flan, weight 4.164 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, barley grain kernel left, spear head upright right, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; ex Pars Coins; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Abila, Decapolis, Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Lucius| |Verus,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |February| |169| |A.D.,| |Abila,| |Decapolis,| |Arabia||AE| |25|
Abila in the Decapolis, also known for a time as Seleucia, and ancient Raphana, is now called Quwaylibah, a site occupied by two tells (Tell al-Abila and Tell Umm al-Amad). Tell in Arabic means only "hill." The archaeological connotation of "hill of accumulated debris" in this case does not apply. The city was built over two natural hills on the left bank of Wadi ("valley") Qweilibeh, which is, in fact, delineated by hills and escarpments. The largest site is located amidst verdant agricultural fields near the modern Ain Quweilbeh spring. Roman temples, Byzantine churches and early mosques lie amidst olive groves and wheat fields.
RP98852. Bronze AE 25, RPC IV.3 Online 6514, Spijkerman 11, Rosenberger IV 12, SNG ANS 1122 ff., Sofaer -, VF, well centered, bold strike, green patina, light corrosion, small edge crack, weight 11.659 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 0o, Abila in Decapolis (Quwaylibah, Jordan) mint, 166 - 167 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP Λ AYPOYHPOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEABIΛHNW-NIAAΓKOICY, nude Herakles seated left on rock, grounded club in right hand, left hand on rocks behind, ΛC ([year] 230) in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 71 (28 May 2020), lot 686; ex Roma Numismatics e-auction 2 (30 Aug 2018), lot 389; $220.00 SALE PRICE $198.00


Tripolis, Lydia, 193 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Tripolis,| |Lydia,| |193| |-| |268| |A.D.||AE| |19|
Nemesis, the balancer of life, is the goddess of revenge, the avenger of crimes and punisher of wicked doers. She distributes fortune, good or bad, in due proportion to each according to what is deserved. She holds a cubit rule to measure each man's just deserts, and her adamantine bridles to restrain the frivolous insolences of mortals. The wheel of fate rests against her side.
RP99406. Bronze AE 19, Choice VF, attractive contrasting dark fields and brassy high points, GRPC Lydia IV 18; BMC Lydia p. 366, 18; SNG Hunterian 2019; SNG Righetti 1112; Weber 6956; Waddington 2664; Mionnet Suppl. VI 565, weight 4.320 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Lydia, Tripolis (near Yenicekent, Turkey) mint, 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse bearded and draped bust of Asklepios right, serpent entwined staff before him; reverse TPIΠOΛEITΩN, winged Nemesis standing slightly left, head left, pulling out the neck of her long chiton with right hand, adamantine bridles in left hand hanging down at side; $195.00 SALE PRICE $176.00


Smyrna, Ionia, c. 161 - 185 A.D.

|Smyrna|, |Smyrna,| |Ionia,| |c.| |161| |-| |185| |A.D.||AE| |15|NEW
Smyrna was an ancient Greek city in Ionia. Located at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia and aided by its advantageous port conditions, its ease of defense and its good inland connections, Smyrna rose to prominence before the Classical Era. In Revelation 2:8-11, Smyrna, Ionia is the church that would suffer persecution. The core of the late Hellenistic and Roman Smyrna is preserved in the Izmir Agora Open Air Museum.
RL110221. Bronze AE 15, Klose p. 174 & pl. 11, 15 (V9/R14); SNG Mu 229; RPC IV-2 T346; SNG Cop 1261; SNGvA 2182; SNG Hunt 1558; Weber 6157; BMC Ionia, p. 260, 207, VF, green patina, earthen deposits, tiny edge splits, scratches, rev. off center, weight 1.721 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Smyrna (Izmir, Turkey) mint, reign of Marcus Aurelius, c. 161 - 185 A.D.; obverse OΠΛOΦVΛAI, bare head of Herakles right, bearded, wearing lion skin around neck; reverse CMVPNAIΩN, river-god reclining left, holding reed, and leaning on inverted urn from which water flows, fish in water; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86924. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Lycia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, gF, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.363 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP96856. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.14.19 (R2), Varbanov I 2359 (R3), AMNG I/I 1387, Moushmov 1013 var. (Herakles' head right), SNG Cop 267 var., BMC Thrace -, VF, nice green patina, light marks, encrustations, ragged edge, weight 3.890 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠO−ΛIT ΠPOC IC, Herakles standing slightly left, head left, nude, leaning on grounded club in right hand, skin of the Nemean lion draped over left arm; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86922. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Lycia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, VF, blue green patina, struck with a slightly damaged obverse die, reverse off center, earthen deposits, weight 2.570 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 180o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00




  



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