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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Quality ▸ PatinaView Options:  |  |  |   

Patina on ancient coins

In this section we include the most attractively patinated bronze coins of our selection, as well as uncleaned hoard and fine cabinet toned silver.


Didius Julianus, 28 March - 2 June 193 A.D.

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193 A.D. - The Year of Five Emperors. On 1 January, the Senate selected Pertinax, against his will, to succeed the late Commodus as Emperor. The Praetorian Guard assassinated him on 28 March and auctioned the throne to the highest bidder, Didius Julianus, who offered 300 million sesterces. Outraged by the Praetorians, legions in Illyricum select Septimius Severus as emperor; in Britannia the legions select their governor Clodius Albinus, and in Syria the legions select their governor Pescennius Niger. On 1 June Septimius Severus entered the capital, put Julianus put to death and replaced the Praetorian Guard with his own troops. Clodius Albinus allied with Severus and accepted the title of Caesar. Pescennius Niger was defeated, killed and his head displayed in Rome
SH89752. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 14a; Woodward, Didius, p. 79 (dies 11/E); Banti 1, Nice F, excellent portrait, attractive dark brown patina, typical tight flan, weight 18.230 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 28 Mar - 2 Jun 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia Militum standing half left, head left, legionary aquila (eagle) standard in right hand, signum standard in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; ex CNG e-auction 276 (21 Mar 2012), lot 420 (sold for $2520 including buyer's fees); rare; $2200.00 (1936.00)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Of this type, the Dictionary of Roman Coins says, "This is a finely designed coin in first brass [a sestertius]. The equestrian group is in a spirited style of workmanship, both horse and man. The Augustus raises aloft his right hand, and with his left holds the bridle of his generous steed, as setting out on him on some journey, about that vague period, his third consulate."
SH89464. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 645 (S), BMCRE III 1313, Hunter II 436, Cohen II 590 var. (bust), SRCV II 3594, Choice VF, mottled turquoise and brown patina, well centered, nice portrait, legends a little weak, edge crack, weight 24.967 g, maximum diameter 33.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 124 - 128 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, emperor on horseback prancing left, bare-headed, wearing military garb, cloak flying behind, raising right hand in salute, reins in left hand, S - C divided low across field, EXPED AVG in exergue; Numismatik Naumann auction 72 (2 Dec 2018), lot 458; scarce; $650.00 (572.00)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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In 146, Marcus Aurelius received the imperium proconsular and Faustina the Younger was given the title Augusta.
SH73156. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV 1669, RIC III 767a, Strack III 974, Cohen II 320, Hill UCR 709, SRCV II 4168, VF, nice green patina, nice portrait, light scratches, tight flan, weight 22.051 g, maximum diameter 31.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 146 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG - PIVS P P TR P, laureate head right; reverse Antoninus in slow quadriga left, eagle-tipped scepter in left, reins in right, COS IIII / S C in two lines in exergue; $380.00 (334.40)


Constantine IV Pogonatus, 15 July 668 - 10 July 685 A.D.

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Constantine IV Pogonatus should be credited with saving Europe from Muslim conquest. Beginning in 674, the great siege of Constantinople, by the caliph Muawiyah I, lasted four years. The newly invented famous "Greek Fire" made the city impregnable and the Arabs were forced to retreat. In 681 he deposed his two brothers. He was succeeded by his 16-year-old son Justinian II.
BZ84239. Bronze half follis, Anastasi 245, DOC II 67, Spahr 186, Hahn MIB III 112, SBCV 1214, Berk -, VF, green patina, rough, weight 2.566 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 679 - 681 A.D.; obverse helmeted and cuirassed bust facing slightly right, holding spear over shoulder; reverse large K, cross above, +AN-NO ∆ (year 4) flanking left and right; very rare; $280.00 (246.40)


Julius Caesar, and Augustus, Thessalonica, Macedonia, After 14 A.D.

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Traditionally attributed to Thessalonica, but Touratsoglou rejected that attribution based on the style and die axis. We believe the style is not remarkably different from similar types from Thessalonica and, as discussed in RPC I, ΘE on the reverse may be an abbreviation of the ethnic.
RP88931. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 5421 (8 spec., uncertain mint); BMC Thessalonica p. 115, 61; SNG Evelpidis 1327; Varbanov 4154 (R5); SNG Cop -; Touratsoglou -, Choice aVF, glossy dark green patina, scattered light corrosion, weight 6.654 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (?, Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 14 A.D.; obverse ΘEOC (downward behind), bare head of Julius Caesar right; reverse CEBACTOY ΘE (clockwise from upper right), bare head of Augustus right; $260.00 (228.80)


Kolophon, Ionia, 190 - 30 B.C.

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Apollo's most important attribute is the tripod lebes, a cauldron in a three-legged stand used for religious rituals. The tripod lebes is symbolic of his prophetic powers. At his temple at Delphi, his priestess sat on his tripod chewing laurel leaves and inhaling hallucinating vapors from a fissure in the floor. After she mumbled her prophesy, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
GB91175. Bronze half obol, Milne Kolophon 175 (6 spec.); Imhoof MG p. 285, 38; Waddington 1501; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -; BMC Ionia -, gVF, beautiful facing head, nice dark green patina, reverse off center, light earthen deposits, weight 5.185 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, Demetrios, magistrate, 190 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo facing slightly left; reverse tripod lebes, ∆HMHTPIOΣ (magistrate) upward on left, KOΛOΦΩNIΩN (ethnic) upward on right; very rare; $250.00 (220.00)


Lot of 9 gVF and Better Late Roman AE4 Bronze Coins 330 - 404 AD NICE!

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LT88493. Bronze Lot, 9 late Roman AE4 bronze coins, 13.9mm - 16.1mm, gVF+, nice coins, nice desert patinas with highlighting earthen deposits, the actual coins in the photographs; $225.00 (198.00)


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89567. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, nice VF, highlighting earthen fill patina, light scratches, weight 3.928 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; ex Lusitania Ancient Coins; $200.00 (176.00)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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In The Reign and Coinage of Carausius, Percy Webb wrote that for Carausius, "...the type Providentia appears with some twenty-four varieties of reverse legend, while the joint effect of obverse and reverse variations of legend and type is to produce upwards of eighty varieties of coins dedicated to that divinity."
RA73501. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 152 (R2) var. (PROVIDENTIA AVGGG), SRCV IV 13697 var. (same), Webb Carausius 178 var. (same), Bourne 33 var. (same), Hunter IV - (p. ccii), aVF/aF, well centered, green patina, near complete legends, nice portrait, corrosion, pit/flaw reverse left field, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, 292 - 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PROVIDEN AVGGG (the foresight of the three emperors), Providentia standing left with baton and cornucopia, globe at feet left, S - P across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, extremely rare, apparently unpublished, the only specimen known to Forum; $180.00 (158.40)


Himera, Sicily, c. 420 - 409 B.C.

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Himera (Termini), on the north coast of Sicily, was an ancient Chalcidic colony from Zancle, founded in the middle of the seventh century B.C. In 409 B.C., Carthage attacked Himera. The city was unprepared; its fortifications weak. At first they were supported about 4000 auxiliaries from Syracuse, but their general, Diocles, seized with panic for the safety of Syracuse itself, abandoned Himera. The city was utterly destroyed, its buildings, even its temples, were razed to the ground. More than 3000 prisoners were executed by General Hannibal Mago as a human sacrifice to the memory of his grandfather General Hamilcar who had been defeated at the Battle of Himera in 480 B.C. The site has been desolate ever since. The few surviving Greeks were settled by the Carthaginians eleven kilometers west of Himera at Thermae Himeraeae (Termini Imerese today). Thermae was taken by the Romans during the First Punic War.
GI91187. Bronze hemilitron, SNG Cop 320; Calciati I p. 43, 35; SGCV I 1110; SNG ANS 186, HGC 2 479, Choice VF, well centered, green patina, small spots of light corrosion, earthen deposits, light scratches, weight 4.255 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 225o, Himera (Termini, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 409 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Himera left, wearing sphendone, six pellets before, IM-E clockwise starting behind neck; reverse six pellets within laurel wreath; $180.00 (158.40)




  



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Catalog current as of Tuesday, July 16, 2019.
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