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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ CrustaceanView Options:  |  |  | 

Crustaceans on Ancient Coins

Akragas, Sicily, c. 420 - 406 B.C.

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On similar common types, the eagle is right, sometimes devouring the fish, and on the reverse the positions of octopus and conch are switched. This particular type with the eagle screaming left and the octopus to the left the conch is missing from all the references examined (Calciati, HGC 2, SNG ANS, SNG Cop, SNG Munchen, SNG Tubingen, SNG Lloyd, BMC Sicily, McClean, Weber, et al.). This coin is the only example on Coin Archives (the Savoca auction).
GB86317. Bronze hemilitron, apparently unpublished; Calciati 47 var. (conch to left); HGC 2 135 (R1) corr. (same obv. die but text says eagle right) var. (conch to left), VF, well centered, some porosity, reverse slightly rough, weight 21.219 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 90o, Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 420 - 406 B.C.; obverse AKP-AΓANTIN-ON, eagle standing left on fish, raising head up screaming, wings open; reverse crab from above, eel in right claw, octopus to left of conch shell below, six pellets around; ex Savoca Numismatik, auction 4 (30 Aug 2015), lot 176; extremely rare variety; $500.00 (425.00)


Akragas, Sicily, c. 450 - 439 B.C.

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Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Akragas was founded c. 582 B.C. by colonists from Gela. It grew rapidly, becoming second only to Syracuse in importance on Sicily but was sacked by Carthage in 406 B.C. and never fully recovered. It was renamed Agrigentum after it fell to Rome in 210 B.C.
GI86590. Silver litra, SNG Cop 47; SNG ANS 989; SNG Mnchen 76; BMC Sicily p. 9, 50; HGC 2 121 (R1), VF, some porosity, areas of corrosion, edge split, weight 0.671 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 270o, Akragas (Agrigentum, Sicily, Italy) mint, c. 450/446 - 439 B.C.; obverse AK-RA (clockwise from upper right, reversed Latin R), sea eagle standing left on Ionic capital; reverse crab seen from above, ΛI (mark of value below); more attractive seen in-hand at actual size; $140.00 (119.00) ON RESERVE


Priapus, Mysia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Palinurus Elephas is a spiny lobster, which is commonly caught in the Mediterranean Sea. Its common names include European spiny lobster, crayfish or cray (in Ireland), common spiny lobster, Mediterranean lobster and red lobster. Claws are much smaller than those of the American lobsters.
GB76833. Bronze AE 19, cf. BMC Mysia p. 176, 3 - 5; SNG Cop 548; SNGvA 1435; SNG Tb 2499; SNG BnF 2401 - 2402, F, centered on a tight flan, green patina, earthen encrustation, pin-prick pitting, weight 5.014 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 90o, Priapus (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠPIAΠHNΩN, lobster or crayfish right, control symbol below (off flan); rare; $95.00 (80.75)


Priapus, Mysia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Priapos (Karabiga, Turkey today) is located on the Mysian coast, on a small east-facing bay at the mouth of the Biga River, about a third of the distance from ancient Parium to Cyzicus. Strabo mentions that the area produced fine wine and that the god Priapus gave the town its ancient name. Thucydides mentions the town as a naval station. In 334 B.C., the town surrendered to Alexander the Great without contest, prior to the Battle of Granicus. Deities worshiped there included Demeter, Apollo, Artemis, and Dionysus. Under the Eastern Roman Empire, the town was known as Pegae and was the site of a Byzantine fortress.
GB84105. Bronze AE 10, Lindgren III 293 var. (AE14), SNG BnF 2404 (scallop control), BMC Mysia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tb -, VF, green patina, weight 1.184 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 0o, Priapus (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse crawfish or shrimp right, ΠPI above, stalk of barley right (control symbol) below; very rare; $95.00 (80.75)


Motya, Sicily, c. 409 - 397 B.C.

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Motya was an ancient and powerful city on an island off the west coast of Sicily, between Drepanum (modern Trapani) and Lilybaeum (modern Marsala). The island was renamed San Pantaleo in the 11th century by Basilian monks. It lies in the Stagnone Lagoon, and is within the comune of Marsala. The island is nearly 850 metres (2,790 ft) long and 750 metres (2,460 ft) wide, and about 1 kilometer (0.62 mi) (six stadia) from the mainland of Sicily. It was joined to the mainland in ancient times by an artificial causeway (paved road), by which chariots with large wheels could reach the town. The remarkable and exquisite Motya Charioteer marble sculpture found in 1979 is world famous and is on display at the local Giuseppe Whitaker museum.
GI85822. Bronze onkia, Jenkins Punic pl. 23, 14; Campana 30; CNS 10 (Eryx); HGC 2 947, F, green patina, tight flan, weight 1.690 g, maximum diameter 10.6 mm, die axis 0o, Motya mint, c. 409-397 BC; obverse bearded male head right; reverse crab seen from above; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $80.00 (68.00)


Anatolia, Unknown King, 2nd Century B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

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RPC I, p. 536, notes that this crab type, struck in three denominations is traditionally attributed to Amyntas, King of Galatia, 39 - 25 B.C., but omits the coins from the catalog because, "It is hard to see that this is really a version of the king's name." RPC then discusses other possible attributions and dismisses them all. We agree Amyntas is surely wrong.
SH65879. Bronze AE 16, SNG Fitzwilliam 5381; Imhoof-Blumer ZfN (1874) p. 332, 13; RPC I - (note, p. 536), VF, weight 3.985 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, obverse crab; reverse BA ME/MTOY / M (sic), inscription in three lines, no type; very rare; $70.00 (59.50)


Priapus, Mysia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Palinurus Elephas is a spiny lobster, which is commonly caught in the Mediterranean Sea. Its common names include European spiny lobster, crayfish or cray (in Ireland), common spiny lobster, Mediterranean lobster and red lobster. Claws are much smaller than those of the American lobsters.
GB84157. Bronze AE 19, cf. BMC Mysia p. 176, 3 - 5; SNG Cop 548; SNGvA 1435; SNG Tb 2499; SNG BnF 2401 - 2402, aF, well centered, rough, weight 4.392 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Priapus (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠPIAΠHNΩN, lobster or crayfish right, uncertain control symbol below; rare; $70.00 (59.50)







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 18, 2018.
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Crustaceans