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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Types| ▸ |Medical & Health||View Options:  |  |  | 

Medical & Health on Ancient Coins
Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

|Aelia| |Flaccilla|, |Aelia| |Flaccilla,| |Augusta| |19| |January| |379| |-| |386| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Theodosius| |I||maiorina|
On the throne Aelia Flaccilla was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God." Theodoret in particular exalts her humility, charity and benevolence (Church History V.19, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended the disabled, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Aelia Flaccilla is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
SL94885. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX 82.1 (S) var. (only 5th officina listed), LRBC II 2170 var. (same), SRCV V 20618 var. (same), Cohen VIII 6, NGC XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5, repatinated (6555578-003), weight 4.216 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), empress standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast, CONSB in exergue; NGC| Lookup; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia||tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Asklepios' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP110209. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG Hunt 2048; SNG Mu 333 var. (rev. leg.); SNG Cop 337 var. (same) BMC Phrygia p. 177, 94 var. (bust); SNGvA 3791 var. (Telesphoros in center), VF, dark near black patina, light deposits, near centered, die wear, small rev. die crack/breaks, weight 7.089 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 195o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AVT K Π ΛIK OVAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠ Π AIΛ ∆HMHETPIANOY IΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios hipparchos, HM ligate), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; AP/X (archon) in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||dupondius|
Salus is the goddess of health but also of the public welfare (Salus publica or Romana). She was often represented on coins and art, like Fortuna, with a rudder and a globe at her feet, indicating her responsibility for steering the state for the good of the people.
RB110005. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC II 604a, BMCRE III 1237, Cohen II 1358, SRCV II 3668, F, nice green patina, light marks, slightly off center, weight 9.994 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 119 - 121 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG P M TR P COS III, Radiate bust right, bare chest, drapery on left shoulder; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus standing left, right foot on globe, patera in right hand, rudder with blade upward in left hand; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Pergamon, Mysia

|Pergamon|, |Salonina,| |Augusta| |254| |-| |c.| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Pergamon,| |Mysia||AE| |27|
Salonina was the wife of emperor Gallienus. A very beautiful and intelligent woman, she was extremely loyal to her husband. Opinion is divided as to whether she was murdered in the purge of Gallienus family after his murder, or if she survived.

Pergamon, Mysia was located to the northwest of the modern city of Bergama, Turkey, 16 miles (26 km) from the Aegean Sea on a promontory on the north side of the Caicus (Bakircay) River. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Pergamon under the Attalid dynasty, 281-133 B.C. Pergamon is cited in the book of Revelation as one of the seven churches of Asia.
RP97266. Bronze AE 27, Weber 5230, SNG BnF 2304 var. (...CE), SNG Tanrikulu 315 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -; SNG Hunt -, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, a bit rough and porous, weight 6.447 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 254 - c. Sep 268 A.D.; obverse KOP CAΛΩNEINA CEB, diademed and draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head; reverse EΠI C AVP ∆AMA ΠEPΓAMH/NΩN - ΠPΩ - Γ - NEΩK (in two clockwise lines), Hygieia standing right, feeding snake held in her right hand, from philae in her left hand; ex Gorny & Mosch online auction 259 (20 Oct 2018), lot 3468; first specimen of this type handled by FORVM; rare; $85.00 SALE PRICE $76.50


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

|Marcus| |Aurelius|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.||sestertius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RB110110. Orichalcum sestertius, KENOM 16-00148 corr. (same dies, misdescribed as TR P XV); RIC III 843; BMCRE III 1037; Cohen III 564; Hunter III p. 323, 91; SRCV II -, Fair, weight 20.640 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, Dec 162 - autumn 163 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M AVREL - ANTONINVS AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse SALVS AVGVSTOR TR P XVII, Salus standing facing, head left, from patera in right hand feeding snake rising from altar at feet on left, short scepter vertical in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field, COS III in exergue; from the Shawn Caza Collection, ex Anciennes Collections (Clermont Ferrand, France); $85.00 SALE PRICE $68.00 ON RESERVE


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

|Carausius|, |Romano-British| |Empire,| |Carausius,| |Mid| |286| |-| |Spring| |or| |Early| |Summer| |293| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing. This coin, dedicated to the health of the emperor, probably indicates the emperor was at the time suffering from some disease, and sacred rites had been performed for his recovery.
RA73489. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 165 (S), Webb Carausius 195, Bourne Carausius -, Linchmere -, Burton Latimer -, Bicester -, Carausian Hoard -, F, green patina, flan cracks, ragged flan, corrosion, encrustations, weight 3.219 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 180o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. late 289 - 291; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, middle reign portrait type; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (the health of the public), Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right hand, from patera held in left hand, B - E across fields, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; scarce; $65.00 SALE PRICE $58.50


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33951. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, SRCV II 6140, EF, weight 3.426 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right hand; SOLD


Clodius Albinus, Late 195 or Early 196 - 19 February 197 A.D.

|Clodius| |Albinus|, |Clodius| |Albinus,| |Late| |195| |or| |Early| |196| |-| |19| |February| |197| |A.D.||denarius|
Asklepios was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis. Apollo killed Coronis for being unfaithful but rescued the unborn Asklepios from her womb. Apollo carried the baby to the centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the art of medicine. In return for some kindness, a snake taught him secret knowledge of healing. Asclepius became so proficient as a healer that he surpassed both Chiron and his father, Apollo. Asclepius was even able to evade death and to bring the dead back to life. Zeus killed him to restore balance to the human population but later resurrected Asclepios as a god to prevent a feud with Apollo. Zeus instructed Asclepios to never revive the dead without his approval.
SH33339. Silver denarius, RIC IV 2, RSC III 9, BMCRE V 88, Hunter III 3, SRCV II 6140, gVF, strong portrait, reverse a little weak, weight 3.109 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 193 - 195 A.D.; obverse D CLOD SEPT ALBIN CAES, bare head right; reverse COS II, Asclepius standing left, snake-entwined staff in right; SOLD


Kos, Carian Islands, c. 88 - 50 B.C.

|Kos|, |Kos,| |Carian| |Islands,| |c.| |88| |-| |50| |B.C.||AE| |15|
In the Hellenistic age, Kos attained the zenith of its prosperity. Its alliance was valued by the kings of Egypt, who used it as a naval outpost to oversee the Aegean. As a seat of learning, it arose as a provincial branch of the museum of Alexandria, and became a favorite resort for the education of the princes of the Ptolemaic dynasty; there was also a medical school. Among its most famous sons were the physician Hippocrates, the painter Apelles, the poets Philitas and, perhaps, Theocritus.
GB84656. Bronze AE 15, apparently unpublished, cf. SNGvA supp. 8176 (head l., A vice B), BMC Caria -, SNG Keckman -, SNG Cop -, SNG Tb -, SNG Mugla -, Lindgren -, HGC 6 -, VF, green patina, earthen highlighting, a little porous, weight 3.375 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kos mint, c. 88 - 50 B.C.; obverse head of Asklepios right; reverse snake coiled around staff, B left; extremely rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Bernhard, O. Griechische und Rmische Mnzbilder in ihren Beziehungen zur Geschichte der Medizin. (Zurich, 1926).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 30, 2022.
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