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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars| ▸ |Augustus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Octavian Augustus, the first and possibly greatest Roman emperor, founded the Roman empire after defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He reformed the coinage and the military, and embarked on a huge building program all across the empire. Augustus was succeeded by his stepson Tiberius after a long reign of 41 years. He was 77, having ruled from 27 B.C. to 14 A.D.

Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Colonia Patricia, Hispania Baetica

|Roman| |Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Colonia| |Patricia,| |Hispania| |Baetica||provincial| |dupondius|
This type was probably struck for Augusts' visit to Colonia Patricia, c. 15 - 14 B.C.
RP98533. Bronze provincial dupondius, Villaronga-Benages 3356, Burgos 1988, RPC I 128, SNG Cop 464, F, dark green patina, a little off center, bumps and marks, scattered corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 22.268 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 270o, Colonia Patricia (Cordoba, Spain) mint, 19 - 2 B.C.; obverse PERMISSV CAESARIS AVGVSTI, bare head right; reverse COLONIA PATRICIA, aquila between two signa; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Augusta Bilbilis, Hispania Tarraconensis

|Hispania|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Augusta| |Bilbilis,| |Hispania| |Tarraconensis||provincial| |as|NEW
Bilbilis, the capital of the Celtiberian Lusones tribe, was refounded under Augustus and designated a municipium. The designation included many privileges under Roman law, including bestowing Roman citizenship on all its inhabitants. Bilbilis was the birthplace of famous poet Martial, c. 40 A.D. The city's heyday was the 1st century. It declined rapidly in the 2nd century A.D. and by the 3rd century it was half-deserted. The modern town of Calatayud was founded near this Roman site. Recent excavations have uncovered many of the impressive remains visible today which dominate the surrounding area and are testament to the city's rich past. Bilbilis
RP98441. Bronze provincial as, Villaronga-Benages 3017a (same ligatures), RPC I 392, SNG Cop 615, SNG Stockholm 1814, F, dark toned fields, flatly struck, weight 13.354 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 270o, Bilbilis (near Calatayud, Spain) mint, 2 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse AVGVSTVS DIV F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right; reverse MVN AVGVSTA BILBILIS M SEMP TIBERI L LICI VARO (magistrates counterclockwise below, MVN, AV, MP and VA ligate), laurel wreath containing II VIR (duumviri); from the Michael Arslan Collection; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Divus Augustus Reverse

|Caligula|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.,| |Divus| |Augustus| |Reverse||denarius|
Tiberius left his estate and the titles of the principate to Caligula and to Tiberius' own grandson, Gemellus, who were to serve as joint heirs. Although Tiberius was 78 and on his death bed, some ancient historians still conjecture that he was murdered. Tacitus writes that the Praetorian Prefect, Macro, smothered Tiberius with a pillow to hasten Caligula's accession, much to the joy of the Roman people. Suetonius writes that Caligula may have carried out the murder himself, though this is not recorded by any other ancient historian. Seneca the elder and Philo, as well as Josephus, record that Tiberius died a natural death. Caligula had Tiberius' will nullified with regards to Gemellus on grounds of insanity, but otherwise he carried out Tiberius' wishes.
SH77011. Silver denarius, RIC I 2, RSC I 11, Lyon 157, BnF II 3, BMCRE I 4, SRCV I 1808, aVF, excellent portraits, light marks, light corrosion, small edge crack, reverse slightly off-center, weight 3.196 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 120o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 37 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT COS, bare head of Caligula right; reverse radiate head of Divus Augustus right, flanked by two stars; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; ex Vecchi Nummorum Auctiones 9 (NYC, 4 Dec 1997), lot 166; rare; SOLD


Cyprus, Time of Augustus, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.

|Cyprus|, |Cyprus,| |Time| |of| |Augustus,| |27| |B.C.| |-| |14| |A.D.||hemiobol|
Augustus' sun sign was Libra. We don't know why he selected the Capricorn as his emblem. Perhaps Capricorn was either his rising sign or his Moon sign. Popular astrology, of the newspaper kind, is sun sign astrology. The ancients tended to attach more importance to the Moon sign and rising signs. Perhaps Augustus selected the Capricorn because it is associated with stern moral authority. Tiberius (born Nov. 13) was a Scorpio.
SH72881. Bronze hemiobol, RPC I 3916; Bank of Cyprus 6; BMC Galatia p. 112, 4 (Commagene); SNG Cop -, Choice EF, beautiful desert patina, weight 2.371 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cypriot mint, 27 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse capricorn right, star with six rays above; reverse scorpion left, star with six rays above; SOLD


Octavian, Triumvir, Consul, and Imperator, Autumn 31 - Summer 30 B.C.

|Octavian|, |Octavian,| |Triumvir,| |Consul,| |and| |Imperator,| |Autumn| |31| |-| |Summer| |30| |B.C.||denarius|
This type celebrates Octavian's victory, defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra at Actium.
SH76225. Silver denarius, RIC I 254b, RSC I 64, BnF I 36, Sear Imperators 407, BMCRE I 603, BMCRR I Rome 4339, SRCV I 1552, VF, toned, broad oval flan, punch, graffiti, marks, scratches - yet, attractive, weight 3.523 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, Italian (Rome?) mint, autumn 31 - summer 30 B.C.; obverse bare head left, no legend, linear border; reverse Victory standing left on globe, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, CAESAR - DIVI•F divided across field, linear border; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Lampsakos, Mysia

|Lampsakos|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Lampsakos,| |Mysia||AE| |16|
Priapus or Priapos was a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and male genitalia. Priapus is marked by his absurdly oversized permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical term priapism. He became a popular figure in Roman erotic art and Latin literature, and is the subject of the often humorously obscene collection of verse called the Priapeia. Statues of Priapus were sometimes placed on boundaries and hung with signs which threatened sexual assault on trespassers.
GB88942. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2274 (8 spec.); SNG BnF 1267; BMC Mysia p. 87, 79; SNG Cop -, Nice gVF, attractive green patina, slightest porosity, slightly off center, weight 3.290 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Lampsakos (Lapseki, Turkey) mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOY clockwise behind, youthful laureate head of Augustus right; reverse ithyphallic Priapus standing left, uncertain object in raised right hand, left hand on hip, L-A/M-Ψ/A-K in three divided lines across field; rare; SOLD


Augustus and Agrippa, c. 10 - 14 A.D., Colonia Augusta Nemausus, Gallia Narbonensis

|Roman| |Gaul|, |Augustus| |and| |Agrippa,| |c.| |10| |-| |14| |A.D.,| |Colonia| |Augusta| |Nemausus,| |Gallia| |Narbonensis||dupondius|
The reverse commemorates the conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C. This theme was probably used at Nemausus because the colony was settled by Egyptian Greeks and veterans from Anthony's army that had surrendered to Octavian at Actium. This coin is from a final revival of the type with the addition of P P, for Pater Patri, Father of the Country, on the obverse. Augustus was honored with this title in 2 B.C.
RP08467. Bronze dupondius, RPC Online I 525, RIC I 159, SNG Cop 700, SNG Tüb 160, SRCV I 1731, VF, weight 12.50 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Augusta Nemausus (Nimes, France) mint, c. 10 - 14 A.D.; obverse back to back heads of Agrippa and Augustus, Agrippa (on left) facing left wearing a rostral crown, Augustus laureate head right, IMP above, P - P flanking below chins, DIVI F below; reverse crocodile right chained to a palm, wreath with long ties over COL - NEM across field above crocodile divided by palm, two palm fronds below crocodile; SOLD


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Unknown Roman Provincial Mint

|Tiberius|, |Tiberius,| |19| |August| |14| |-| |16| |March| |37| |A.D.,| |Unknown| |Roman| |Provincial| |Mint||AE| |23|
Tiberius became Augustus' stepson when the emperor married Livia in 38 B.C. Augustus forced Tiberius to divorce the wife he loved and marry his daughter Julia. Tiberius hated his new wife and escaped her by going into exile at Rhodes in 6 B.C. After the deaths of the other possible successors, he was recalled in 2 A.D. and groomed to succeed Augustus, which he did on 19 August 14.
SH19968. Bronze AE 23, RPC I Supp. 5475 (this coin, unique), Lindgren III 1659 (this coin), F, brown patina, weight 8.109 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 225o, uncertain mint, obverse TIBEPIOC CEBACTOC, laureate head of Tiberius right; reverse laureate head (of Augustus?) right; unique; SOLD


Sabratha, Syrtica, North Africa, c. 8 - 14 A.D., Augustus Reverse

|Roman| |Africa|, |Sabratha,| |Syrtica,| |North| |Africa,| |c.| |8| |-| |14| |A.D.,| |Augustus| |Reverse||AE| |24|
Sabratha is on the Mediterranean coast about 66 km west of Tripoli, Libya. It was a Tyrian or Carthaginian settlement, the farthest of the west of the three chief cities of Syrtica, with a prosperous harbor. It became a colony in the second century A.D., perhaps under Trajan. Septimius Severus was born nearby in Leptis Magna, and Sabratha reached its peak under the Severans. The city was badly damaged by earthquakes in the 4th century, particularly the quake of 365. Within a hundred years of the Arab conquest of the Maghreb, trade had shifted to other ports and Sabratha dwindled to a village.Roman Theater of Sabratha
RP89294. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 815, Müller Afrique 57, SNG Cop 41, De Luynes 3726, Alexandropoulos 43b, F, dark near black patina, some earthen deposits, scratches, pit (flan flaw?) on reverse, weight 7.680 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 180o, Syrtica mint, c. 8 - 14 A.D.; obverse neo-Punic inscription behind: (SBRT'N), bust of Serapis right, neo-Punic inscription under neck: (ZY•MS); reverse CAESAR (downward behind), bare head of Augustus right, lituus before; rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia||AE| |23|
Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted to mean worshiped at Tauris (Crimea), or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or the hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis Tauropolos by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was said to have been from the Taurians. The festival of Artemis at Athens was called the Tauropolia.
RP92733. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1630; SNG ANS 162; SNG Cop 92; AMNG III 71; BMC Macedonia p. 52, 76; Varbanov III 3117 (R5), F, spots of corrosion, deposits and encrustations, a little off center, weight 6.708 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 16 Jan 27 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAROΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse Artemis Tauropolos seated facing riding on bull galloping right, holding billowing veil with both hands, ∆HMOY AMΦIΠOΛITΩN in two lines below; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

AVGVSTVS
AVGVSTVSDIVIF
AVGVSTVSTRPOT
AVGVSTVSTRPOTVII
CAESARAVGPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARAVGVSTPONTMAXTRIBVNICPOT
CAESARAVGVSTVS
CAESARAVGVSTVSDIVIF
CAESARAVGVSTVS DIVIFPATERPATRIAE
CAESARAVGVSTVSSPQR
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRIBVNICPOTEST
CAESARAVGVSTVSTRPOT
CAESARAVGTRIBVNPOTES
CAESARCOSVI
CAESARDIVIFCOSVI
CAESARIAVGVSTO
CAESARIMP
CAESARIMPVII
CAESARIIIVIRRPC
CAESARPONTMAX
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
CCAESARIMP
CCAESARIIIVIRRPC
DIVOAVGVSTO
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQR
DIVOAVGVSTOSPQROBCIVESSER
DIVVSAVGVSTVS
DIVVSAVGVSTVSPATER
DIVVSAVGVSTVSSC
DIVIIVLIF
GALVSMESSALLAIIIVIR
IMPCAESAR
IMPCAESARAVGVST
IMPCAESARAVGVSTTRPOTIIX
IMPCAESARDIVIF
IMPCAESARDIVIFAVGVSTVSIMPXX
IMPCAESARDIVIFCOSVILIBERTATISPRVINDEX
IMP CAESAR DIVI F III VIR ITER
IMP CAESAR DIVI F VIR ITER R P C
IMP CAESARI
IMP CAESAR DIVI IVLI
IMP IX TR POV
LAMIASILIVSANNIVS
OB CIVIS SERVATOS
PBETILIENVSBASSVS
PVLCHERTAVRVSREGVLVS
SCOBRPCVMSALVTIMPCAESARAVGCONS
S P Q R IMP CAESARI
S P Q R IMP CAESARI AVG COS XI TR POT VI
S P Q R PARENT CONSSVO


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online - http://numismatics.org/search/search
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and supplement).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. One: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, I Auguste. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 1: Augustus to Vitellius. (London, 1923).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Vol. One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sutherland, C. The Cistophori of Augustus. (London, 1970).
Sutherland, C. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. I, From 39 BC to AD 69. (London, 1984).
Sutherland, C. & C. Kraay. Catalogue of Coins of the Roman Empire in the Ashmolean Museum, Part I: Augustus. (Oxford, 1975).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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