Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ LugdunumView Options:  |  |  |   

Lugdunum, Gaul (Lyons, France)

Strabo wrote, "The Romans possess Lugdunum, founded below a ridge at the confluence of the Arar and the Rhone. It is the most populous of all the other cities except Narbo; for it is a center of commerce, and the Roman emperors strike their silver and gold coinage there." (4.3.2). Dates of operation: 15 B.C. - c. 90 A.D., 195 - 196, and c. 254 - 423. Mintmarks: LG, LVG


Revolt Against Nero, Gaius Iulius Vindex, Governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, c. Late 67 - May 68 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Struck by Gaius Iulius Vindex, the Roman governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, who rebelled against Nero's tax policy and declared allegiance to Galba, the governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, as the new emperor. Vindex was defeated and killed in battle near Vesontio (modern Besancon), but the military continued to support Galba. On 9 June 68, deserted by the Praetorian Guard, Nero stabbed himself in the throat.
RS88405. Silver denarius, Unpublished, civil war restitution of Augustus, only three examples known to Forum, all share the same obverse die, two reverse dies known, VF, rainbow toning, lamination defects, porosity, scratches, edge split, weight 3.280 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain (Lugdunum?) mint, c. late 67 - May 68 A.D.; obverse [CAESAR], bare head of Augustus right; reverse AVGVSTVS, young bull walking right, head turned facing; found in Spain; $1500.00 (1275.00)


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 36 A.D., Herod Antipas suffered major losses in a war with Aretas IV of Nabataea, provoked partly by Antipas' divorce of Aretas' daughter. According to Josephus, Herod's defeat was popularly believed to be divine punishment for his execution of John the Baptist. Tiberius ordered Vitellius, the governor of Syria, to capture or kill Aretas, but Vitellius was reluctant to support Herod and abandoned his campaign upon Tiberius' death in 37.
SL87773. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 6, 154; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 60; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, NGC Ch XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490382-004), weight 3.443 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 270o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 36 - 37 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right, laurel wreath ties fall stiffly, Tiberius features are older and have become caricatures; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; photos taken before certification, now in an NGC holder; $700.00 (595.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 1 March 293, Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. This is considered the beginning of the Tetrarchy, known as the Quattuor Principes Mundi ("Four Rulers of the World"). The four Tetrarchs established their capitals close to the Roman frontiers:
- Nicomedia (northwestern Asia Minor) became capital for Diocletian
- Mediolanum (Milan, near the Alps) became the capital for Maximian
- Augusta Treverorum (Trier, in Germany) became the capital for Constantius Chlorus
- Sirmium (Serbia, on the Danube border) became the capital for Galerius
RA85657. Billon antoninianus, Bastien Lyon XI 503 (15), SRCV IV 13154, RIC V-2 404 var. (officina), Cohen VI 427, Hunter IV - (p. clxxxvi), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, some silvering, some legend letters unstruck (filled die?), weight 4.063 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, emission 10, 2nd series, 1 Mar 293 - 20 Nov 293; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Minerva standing left, raising olive branch pointed upward in right hand, grounded spear and oval shield in left hand, A in exergue; scarce military bust; $125.00 (106.25)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA84973. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 399; Bastien VII 387, pl. XXVIII (46 spec.); Cohen VI 442; Compas Collection 235, EF/VF, choice obverse with much silvering, reverse slightly off center with light corrosion, weight 3.476 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 7th emission, 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG, radiate consular bust left, wearing imperial mantle, eagle-tipped scepter in right hand; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, Victory on globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, B in exergue; scarce; $90.00 (76.50)


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. On this coin, the Caesar, Titus, the designated successor of the emperor, is identified as the hope for the future of the Roman people.
RB88238. Copper as, RIC II-1 Vespasian 1273, BMCRE II Vespasian 868, Cohen I 217, Lyon XX 123, BnF III Vespasian 877, Hunter I -, SRCV I -, F, nice portrait, well centered obverse, bumps and marks, porosity, weight 9.631 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP AVG F TR P COS VI CENSOR, laureate head right, globe at point of neck; reverse Spes walking left, flower in right hand, raising fold of drapery with left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $90.00 (76.50)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL77203. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, charming portrait, some silvering, weight 3.162 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL84257. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice aEF, some silvering, well centered, some letters on reverse not fully struck (filled die?), some porosity, tiny edge crack, weight 2.639 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL84258. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, traces of silvering, attractive nice surfaces, nearly as struck, weight 3.186 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father's death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarreling with his brother Constans, he invaded his territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.
RB84919. Billon centenionalis, Bastien XIII 14, pl. 1 (15 spec.); RIC VII 76 (R3); Cohen VII 227; Compass Collection 407; SRCV V 17267, VF, near centered on a tight flan, light scratches, light deposits, weight 2.887 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 1st emission, 318 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTINO IVN NOB C, boy's laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP, Two Victories holding wreath on altar, VOT / PR in two lines within wreath, X on altar, two captives seated back-to-back in exergue, no P - L at sides; very rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA87258. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 Lugdunum 408 (S), Bastien Lyon XI 613 pl. XLIII (5 ex.), Cohen VI 436 var. (helmeted), Hunter IV - (p. clxxxvii), SRCV IV -, gVF, well centered and struck, traces if silvering, porous, weight 3.497 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, emission 12, series 2, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, A in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Bastien, P., J-B. Giard, et al. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon. (Wetteren, 1972 - 2003).
Compas, D., N. Parisot, M. Prieur & L Schmitt. Lyon Monnaies Romaines Collection Daniel Compas. cgb.fr. (2006).

Catalog current as of Thursday, March 21, 2019.
Page created in 1.047 seconds.
Lugdunum