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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Siscia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Siscia, Pannonia (Sisak, Croatia)

Siscia, now Sisak, Croatia, was one of the most important places in Roman Pannonia. It was at confluence of two navigable rivers, the Colapis and Savus, which carried considerable commerce. Siscia was captured by Tiberius, in the reign of Augustus. Tiberius did much to enlarge and embellish the town, including digging a canal to form an island, enhancing the fortifications. It became the central point from which Augustus and Tiberius campaigned against the Pannonians and Illyrians. Pliny mentions Siscia was made a colonia at that time. In the time of Septimius Severus it received fresh colonists, after which it was called Col. Septimia Siscia. When Diocletian split Pannonia into four provinces, Siscia became the capital of Pannonia Savia. It contained the mint and treasury, and was the station of the small fleet kept on the Savus. Siscia maintained its importance until Sirmium began to rise: as Sirmium rose, Siscia declined. The mint master at Siscia was called the procurator monetae Siscianae. Mint dates of operation: c. 262 - 283. Mintmarks: S, SIS, SISC, SISCPS.

Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D.

|Maximian|, |Maximian,| |286| |-| |305,| |306| |-| |308,| |and| |310| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
When Diocletian split Pannonia into four provinces, Siscia became the capital of Pannonia Savia. It contained the mint and treasury, and was the station of the small fleet kept on the Savus. Siscia maintained its importance until Sirmium began to rise, for in proportion as Sirmium rose, Siscia declined.
RA112722. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 p. 288, 585; SRCV IV 13179; Cohen VI 545; Hunter IV - (p. clxxxix), Choice gVF, centered, some slivering, weight 3.939 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, c. 286 - 288 A.D.; obverse IMP C M A VAL MAXIMIANVS P AVG, radiate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVGG (victory of the two emperors), Maximian (on left) and Diocletian standing confronted, both wear military garb, receiving victory on globe from Diocletian with right hand, Maximian holds scepter in left hand, Diocletian holds a transverse spear in left hand, B low center, XXI in exergue; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||centenionalis|NEW
In 320, Licinius reneged on the religious freedom promised by the Edict of Milan, and began a new persecution of Christians in the Eastern Roman Empire. He destroyed churches, imprisoned Christians and confiscated their property.
RL111911. Billon centenionalis, Hunter V p. 194, 253 (also 5th officina); RIC VII Siscia p. 438, 109 (R3); SRCV IV 16325; Cohen VII 690, gVF, centered, dark patina, earthen encrustations, weight 2.987 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 320 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCIT (courage of the army), vexillum standard inscribed VOT / XX in two lines, flanked by two bearded captives seated back to back at base, captive on left with hands bound behind, captive on right looking back and up at vexillum, S - F divided high across fields, ESIS* in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00
 


Severus II, 25 July 306 - Summer 307 A.D.

|Severus| |II|, |Severus| |II,| |25| |July| |306| |-| |Summer| |307| |A.D.||quarter| |follis|
On 1 May 305, Emperor Diocletian, at age 60 and after a reign of nearly 21 years during which the last vestiges of republican government disappeared, abdicated and retired to his palace at Salona (modern Split) on the Adriatic coast. The capital of the Western Empire was moved from Rome to Milan. Constantius Chlorus requested leave for his son Constantine I who remained at Galerius' court in Nicomedia, as a virtual hostage.
RT112165. Billon quarter follis, RIC VI Siscia 170a (R), SRCV IV 14645, Cohen VII 32, Hunter V -, VF, green patina, centered, scratches, parts of legends weak, weight 2.088 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 1 May 305 - 25 Jul 306 A.D.; obverse FL VAL SEVERVS NOB C, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder and kalathos on head, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, SIS in exergue; from Shawn Caza former diplomat, author of A Handbook of Late Roman Coins (Spink, 2021), collection assembled during postings and international travel; ex Agora Vienna (Reinhard Dollinger); scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|NEW
Probus started as a simple soldier but advanced to general and was declared emperor after the death of Tacitus. Florian's murder left him as undisputed ruler. His leadership brought peace and prosperity but he was murdered by mutinous soldiers, enraged at being employed on public building projects.
RA112724. Billon antoninianus, Alföldi Siscia V type 23, 115; RIC V-2 665F; Cohen VI 164; Pink VI-1, p. 51, 5th emission; Hunter IV -; SRCV III -, Choice VF, full border centering, dark patina, marks, weight 4.294 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, c. 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Probus (on left), togate, and Concordia, draped, standing confronted and clasping hands, star low center, XXIQ in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
In early in December 316, to ensure his loyalty, Licinius elevated Aurelius Valerius Valens, the dux limitis (duke of the frontier) in Dacia, to the rank of Augustus. According to Petrus Patricius, when Constantine learned of this "The emperor made clear the extent of his rage by his facial expression and by the contortion of his body. Almost unable to speak, he said, 'We have not come to this present state of affairs, nor have we fought and triumphed from the ocean till where we have now arrived, just so that we should refuse to have our own brother-in-law as joint ruler because of his abominable behavior, and so that we should deny his close kinship, but accept that vile slave [Valens] with him into imperial college.'" The treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. Whether it was part of that agreement is unknown, but Licinius had Valens executed.
RT113175. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 8 (R1), SRCV IV 15211, Cohen VII 65; Hunter V 69 var. (1st officina), Choice gVF, full legends, dark patina, weight 3.129 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory offering wreath standing right on globe in his right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with head right and wreath in beak at feet on left, B right, SIS in exergue; from the Michael Arslan Collection, ex Sol Numismatik auction XVI (5 Aug 2023), lot 476; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 276, Florianus was assassinated near Tarsus by his own troops after only weeks of ruling. Probus, age 44, was proclaimed the new Emperor of Rome. This type was among his first issues. Alföldi believed the bust on this type resembled Florian.
RL98386. Billon antoninianus, Alföldi Siscia V type 26, 20; RIC V-2 651C; Cohen VI 137; Hunter IV 280 var. (1st officina); SRCV III -, Choice VF, some silvering, well centered, attractive portrait, light deposits, weight 3.748 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 2nd half 276 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Probus (on left) and Concordia standing confronted, clasping hands, Δ in center, XXI in exergue; $80.00 SALE PRICE $64.00
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
RA112893. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 737H; Cohen VI 556; Pink VI-1, p. 50; SRCV III -, aVF, well centered, green patina, scattered tiny pits, rev. a little rough, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.212 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 277 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate bust left in consular robe, eagle-tipped scepter in right; reverse ROMAE AETERNAE (to eternal Rome), hexastyle temple, statue of Roma seated left inside, Victory in her right hand, long scepter vertical in her left hand, shield leaning against seat, three steps, wreath on pediment, XXIS in exergue; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00
 


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis| |(large)|
These legends and types were struck in two issues RIC VI 198a, c. 309 - 310, and RIC 207a, c. 310 - 5 May 311. The earlier issue was struck with only officiae A, B and Γ, therefore, without even considering other variations we can be certain this coin is from the second issue.
RT99299. Billon follis (large), RIC VI Siscia p. 480, 207a; SRCV IV 14505; Hunter V p. 62, 7 var. (2nd officina); Cohen VI 133 (Maximian), gVF, amusing style and sharp detail on the reverse, slight porosity, reverse slightly off center, weight 7.444 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, c. 310 - 5 May 311 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse GENIO AVGVSTI (to the guardian spirit of the Emperor), Genius standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, crescent with horns upward lower left, Δ right, SIS in exergue; from a private collector in New Jersey; $70.00 SALE PRICE $56.00
 


Vetranio, 1 March - 25 December 350 A.D.

|Vetranio|, |Vetranio,| |1| |March| |-| |25| |December| |350| |A.D.||maiorina|
Vetranio was declared emperor by his troops in 350 A.D. Immediately expressing his support for Constantius II, he was instrumental in keeping the rebellion of Magnentius under control. After Constantius arrived to take control of the situation, Vetranio abdicated and lived the remainder of his life in comfort.
SH35844. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 290 (S), LRBC II 1176, Voetter 6, SRCV V 18903, Cohen VII 3, Choice EF, weight 2.751 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 350 A.D.; obverse D N VETRANIO P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star in front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Vetranio standing slightly left in military dress, a labarum (Christogram standard) in each hand, A left, •ESIS* in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Vetranio, 1 March - 25 December 350 A.D.

|Vetranio|, |Vetranio,| |1| |March| |-| |25| |December| |350| |A.D.||maiorina|
This reverse is much scarcer than Vetranio's usual HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS and CONCORDIA MILITVM types.
RL42424. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 296 (S), LRBC II 1182, Voetter 12, SRCV V 18908, Cohen VIII 11 corr., EF, sharp detail, weight 2.370 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 350 A.D.; obverse D N VETRANIO P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGVSTORVM (the valor of the Emperor), emperor, standing right, holding spear and globe, at feet seated captive, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; SOLD




  



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