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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Siscia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Siscia, Pannonia (Sisak, Croatia)

Siscia, a chief town and colony of Pannonia, was located at confluence of the Colapis and Savus, and is now called Sisak, Croatia. The mint master was called procurator monetae Siscianae. Dates of operation: 260 - c. 390. Mintmarks: S, SIS, SISC, SISCPS.

City of Constantinople Commemorative, 334 - 335 A.D.

|Commemoratives|, |City| |of| |Constantinople| |Commemorative,| |334| |-| |335| |A.D.||reduced| |centenionalis|
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL93221. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 11 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Siscia 241, LRBC I 751, SRCV IV 16469, Cohen VII 22, VF, well centered, dark patina, small green encrustations, areas of corrosion, weight 2.116 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 334 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, •BSIS• in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20) ON RESERVE


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

|Licinius| |I|, |Licinius| |I,| |11| |November| |308| |-| |18| |September| |324| |A.D.||follis|
In early in December 316, to ensure his loyalty, Licinius elevated Aurelius Valerius Valens, the dux limitis (duke of the frontier) in Dacia, to the rank of Augustus. According to Petrus Patricius, when Constantine learned of this "The emperor made clear the extent of his rage by his facial expression and by the contortion of his body. Almost unable to speak, he said, 'We have not come to this present state of affairs, nor have we fought and triumphed from the ocean till where we have now arrived, just so that we should refuse to have our own brother-in-law as joint ruler because of his abominable behavior, and so that we should deny his close kinship, but accept that vile slave [Valens] with him into imperial college.'" The treaty between Constantine and Licinius was concluded at Serdica on 1 March, 317. Whether it was part of that agreement is unknown, but Licinius had Valens executed.
RL93200. Billon follis, RIC VII Siscia 8 (R1), SRCV IV 15211, Cohen VII 65; Hunter V 69 var. (1st officina), aVF, well centered, dark brown patina, pitting and corrosion, scratches, weight 3.467 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI (to Jupiter the protector), Jupiter standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulder, Victory offering wreath standing right on globe in his right hand, long scepter in left hand, eagle left with head right and wreath in beak at feet on left, B right, SIS in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $50.00 (€46.00)
 


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

|Julian| |II|, |Julian| |II| |"the| |Apostate,"| |February| |360| |-| |26| |June| |363| |A.D.||double| |maiorina|
On March 5, 363 Julian departed Antioch with an army of 90,000, marching against the Sassanid Empire. On 29 May Julian arrived under the walls of the Sassanid capital and defeated the army of Shapur II at the Battle of Ctesiphon, but he was unable to put the city under siege. On June 16, Julian began a retreat from the Sassanid Empire. The Sassanids attacked the retreating Romans and on 26 June Julian was killed in battle. The general Jovian was proclaimed Emperor by the troops on the battlefield.
SH58901. Billon double maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 412, Choice gVF, weight 8.974 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVB (security of the Republic), bull standing right, two stars above; palm, BSIS•, palm in exergue; ex Ancient Numismatic Enterprise, nice glossy black patina, excellent centering; rare; SOLD







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