Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities Welcome To Forum Ancient Coins!!! All Items Purchased From Forum Ancient Coins Are Guaranteed Authentic For Eternity!!! Internet Challenged? We Are Happy To Take Your Order Over The Phone 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Mints| ▸ |Siscia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Siscia, Pannonia (Sisak, Croatia)

Siscia, now Sisak, Croatia, was one of the most important places in Roman Pannonia. It was at confluence of two navigable rivers, the Colapis and Savus, which carried considerable commerce. Siscia was captured by Tiberius, in the reign of Augustus. Tiberius did much to enlarge and embellish the town, including digging a canal to form an island, enhancing the fortifications. It became the central point from which Augustus and Tiberius campaigned against the Pannonians and Illyrians. Pliny mentions Siscia was made a colonia at that time. In the time of Septimius Severus it received fresh colonists, after which it was called Col. Septimia Siscia. When Diocletian split Pannonia into four provinces, Siscia became the capital of Pannonia Savia. It contained the mint and treasury, and was the station of the small fleet kept on the Savus. Siscia maintained its importance until Sirmium began to rise: as Sirmium rose, Siscia declined. The mint master at Siscia was called the procurator monetae Siscianae. Mint dates of operation: c. 262 - 283. Mintmarks: S, SIS, SISC, SISCPS.

Carus, Early September 282 - c. July or August 283 A.D.

|Carus|, |Carus,| |Early| |September| |282| |-| |c.| |July| |or| |August| |283| |A.D.||antoninianus|
In 282, Probus traveled towards Sirmium (Serbia). He tried to employ his troops in peaceful projects, such as draining the swamps in Pannonia. His troops, unhappy about this labor, murdered him. Marcus Aurelius Carus, an Illyrian and Probus' praetorian prefect, was proclaimed the new emperor.
RA97844. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 110 (R); Cohen VI 24; Venèra IV 4339 - 4352; Hunter IV 12; Pink VI-2, pp. 48; SRCV III 12403, EF, excellent portrait, near full borders on a broad oval flan, scattered small encrustations, two edge splits and flan crack, weight 4.064 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia mint, c. 284 A.D.; obverse DIVO CARO PARTHICO, radiate head right; reverse CONSECRATIO AVG, funeral altar, nearly square, four panels in front, large flame on top, A right, SMSXXI in exergue; from a Norwegian collection; rare; $200.00 (€164.00)
 


Constantine the Great, Early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

|Constantine| |the| |Great|, |Constantine| |the| |Great,| |Early| |307| |-| |22| |May| |337| |A.D.||centenionalis|NEW
The reverse legend abbreviates, Victoriae Laetae Principium Perpertua, which translates, "Joyous victory to the eternal Prince." VOT P R on the shield abbreviates, Vota Populi Romani, which translates, "Vows (prayers) of the Roman people."
RL97850. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Siscia 47 (R3) (altar type u), Cohen VII 639, SRCV IV 16301, Hunter V -, aVF, uneven earthen deposits, scratches, some letters in legends not struck (filled dies), weight 3.223 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 318 A.D.; obverse IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, helmeted, laureate, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP, two Victories standing confronted, together holding shield inscribed VOT / P R (vows of the Roman people) over altar inscribed with X, ∆SIS* in exergue; rare; $50.00 (€41.00)
 


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Siscia, now Sisak, Croatia, was one of the most important places in Roman Pannonia. It was at confluence of two navigable rivers, the Colapis and Savus, which carried considerable commerce. Siscia was captured by Tiberius, in the reign of Augustus. Tiberius did much to enlarge and embellish the town, including digging a canal to form an island, enhancing the fortifications. It became the central point from which Augustus and Tiberius campaigned against the Pannonians and Illyrians. Pliny mentions Siscia was made a colonia at that time. In the time of Septimius Severus it received fresh colonists, after which it was called Col. Septimia Siscia. When Diocletian split Pannonia into four provinces, Siscia became the capital of Pannonia Savia. It contained the mint and treasury, and was the station of the small fleet kept on the Savus. Siscia maintained its importance until Sirmium began to rise: as Sirmium rose, Siscia declined.
RL94826. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 666C; Cohen VI 162; Pink p. 53, series 7; SRCV III 11966 var. (bust); Hunter IV - (cxlvi), F, well centered, earthen encrustations, scratches, weight 3.370 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, c. 280 A.D.; obverse IMP PROBVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Probus, on left, standing right, and Concordia, on right, standing left, clasping hands, T low center, XXI in exergue; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $45.00 (€36.90)
 







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Thursday, October 21, 2021.
Page created in 0.786 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity