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Ancient Roman Coins

Forum maintains a large inventory of ancient Roman coins for sale in our shop. Some late Roman bronze coins are priced as low as few dollars. Some historical, beautiful, and rare types are much more. You can use the menu on the left to view and shop for coins of the Republic, or of a specific period or emperor.


Roman Coins and Their Values, 4th Revised Edition

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Roman| |Coins| |and| |Their| |Values,| |4th| |Revised| |Edition|,
ROMAN COINS AND Their VALUES, 1988 edition, by David Sear

The only one-volume priced guide to the coinage of Republican and Imperial Rome. The original edition of Sear's Roman Coins and Their Values was published by Seaby thirty-six years ago and has been through three revisions (1970, 1974, and 1981). This edition is a reprint of the 1988 Seaby's version. It is an indispensable listing of all major types of gold, silver and bronze, issued over some seven hundred and fifty years by the greatest militaristic state the world has ever known. Over 4,300 coins are included with detailed description and valuations and all major and minor personalities are listed by means of their portrait coins. This fourth revised edition takes notice under the Republic of recent work in the field, especially that of Professor Michael Crawford. In the Imperial period, essential new references that have appeared since the previous edition are all incorporated, for example Dr. J. P. C. Kent's magisterial volume Roman Imperial Coinage VIII, and the late Dr. C. H. V. Sutherland's extensive revision of Roman Imperial Coinage I. The introductory material on denominations, reverse types, mints, mint marks and dating presents a useful background, as do the succinct biographical details that precede the listing of coins issued by emperors and members of the imperial family. Previous editions have been acknowledged by collectors, Roman historians and scholars alike as the most useful single volume reference work in the field. With 12 plates, over 900 photos in the text and a map.
BKBSRCV. Roman Coins and Their Values, 4th Revised Edition by David R. Sear, 1988 edition (reprint), 388 pages, 12 plates, valuations in £, hardback, list price $70.00; $43.00 SALE |PRICE| $38.70


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Lead| |Glandes| |Sling-Bullet,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|,
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00


Roman Base Metal Coins - A Price Guide

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Roman| |Base| |Metal| |Coins| |-| |A| |Price| |Guide|,
Roman Base Metal Coins - A Price Guide by Richard Plant

A slim 80-page paperback generously peppered with more than 640 line drawings depicting almost every Roman emperor who ever donned a purple toga..
- Current market values in Fine or Very Fine grades from 241BC - 498AD
- Hundreds of accurate line drawings of most coin types
- A list of 3rd - 6th Century Mint town markings
- Historical notes of coinage changes and metal types
- Values for common barbaric types
- Information on Roman coin grading

Click here to see sample pages from Roman Base Metal Coins - A Price Guide

BKBRBMC. Roman Base Metal Coins - A Price Guide, 4th Edition by Richard Plant, $10.00 SALE |PRICE| $9.00


Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume III

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |Roman| |Coins| |and| |Their| |Values,| |Volume| |III|,
ROMAN COINS AND THEIR VALUES, Volume Three, The Accession of Maximus to the Death of Carinus AD235 - AD 285 by David Sear

The third volume of the fully revised and expanded general catalogue of Roman coins extends coverage of the Imperial series from the accession of Maximinus I in AD 235 down to the assassination of Carinus and the accession of Diocletian half a century later.
BKBSME3. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume III by David R. Sear, The Third Century Crisis and Recovery, A.D. 235-285 (The Accession of Maximus to the Death of Carinus), illustrations throughout, valuations in £ and US$ in at least two grades of preservation, hardback, laminated jacket, new, special price!; $58.00 SALE |PRICE| $52.20


The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins

|Special| |-| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Coins|, |The| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Imperial| |Coins|,
First published in 1991, Van Meter's Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins (HRIC) quickly became a cult classic among collectors. In 1999, used copies were trading in excess of $100 on eBay. This was no surprise, really..the book remains the most comprehensive, and yet easy-to-use one-volume reference on Roman Imperial Coins! With over 330 large-format pages, and 1000 † illustrations, the HRIC provides the collector with both an expansive overview of the history of the coinage, and a particularly thorough catalogue of the coin types. Numerous charts, tables, and a lexicon make identifying, attributing and understanding your coins a pleasure. This book is quite simply the best value in reference literature on Roman Imperial coins!

SPECIAL OFFER! Order The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins and a coin at the same time - $10 will be automatically deducted from your order at checkout!
BKBHRIC. Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins by David Van Meter, $34.95 SALE |PRICE| $31.46


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius

|Faustina| |Jr.|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius|, aureus
Laetitia is the Roman goddess of gaiety and joy, her name deriving from the root word laeta, meaning happy. She is typically depicted on coinage with a wreath in her right hand, and a scepter, a rudder, or an anchor in her left hand. On the coins of empresses, Laetitia may signal a birth in the Imperial family.
SH93043. Gold aureus, Caliců 2066 (same rev. die); RIC III MA699; BMCRE IV MA129 note; Cohen III 146; SRCV II 5242; Hunter II -, gVF, light marks on edge, weight 6.763 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right, hair in bun at the back; reverse LAETITIA, Laetitia standing facing, wreath in right hand, long scepter in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 80 (04 Aug 2019), lot 563; ex Roma Numismatics 14 (27 Jan 2019), lot 761; Numismatica Ars Classica auction 106 (09 May 2018), lot 973; ex Roma Numismatics sale XIV (21 Sep 2017), 761 (realized £4,600 plus fees); extremely rare; $5200.00 SALE |PRICE| $4680.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.|, aureus
Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.
SH94301. Gold aureus, RIC IV 23 (R), Caliců 3213, Cohen IV 195, SRCV III 8579, Hunter - (p. lxxxiii), gVF, well centered and struck, flow lines, bumps, light scrape on obverse, weight 4.732 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Rome mint, special emission, early 239 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P II COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for two years, consul, father of the country), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left; scarce; $4700.00 SALE |PRICE| $4230.00


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D.

|Caligula|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.|, sestertius
This type was the first portrait sestertius struck at the mint of Rome. The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars.
SH94041. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 37, BMCRE I 38, Cohen I 24, BnF II 50, Hunter I 15, SRCV I -, Choice VF, well centered, attractive style, dark reddish brown patina, highest point of bust a little weakly struck, weight 28.089 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 37 - 38 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laureate head left; reverse S P Q R / P P / OB CIVES / SERVATOS (from the Senate and people of Rome to the father of the country for saving the citizens) in four lines within Corona Civica oak wreath; ex Nomos Obolos auction 9 (25 March 2018), 160; ex Stoecklin Collection (Amriswil, Switzerland, acquired prior to 1975, see The Story of the Stoecklin Collection); $3280.00 SALE |PRICE| $2952.00


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia|, AE 36
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $2655.00 SALE |PRICE| $2390.00


Didius Julianus, 28 March - 2 June 193 A.D.

|Didius| |Julianus|, |Didius| |Julianus,| |28| |March| |-| |2| |June| |193| |A.D.|, sestertius
193 A.D. - The Year of Five Emperors. On 1 January, the Senate selected Pertinax, against his will, to succeed the late Commodus as Emperor. The Praetorian Guard assassinated him on 28 March and auctioned the throne to the highest bidder, Didius Julianus, who offered 300 million sesterces. Outraged by the Praetorians, legions in Illyricum select Septimius Severus as emperor; in Britannia the legions select their governor Clodius Albinus, and in Syria the legions select their governor Pescennius Niger. On 1 June Septimius Severus entered the capital, put Julianus put to death and replaced the Praetorian Guard with his own troops. Clodius Albinus allied with Severus and accepted the title of Caesar. Pescennius Niger was defeated, killed and his head displayed in Rome
SH89752. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 14a; Woodward, Didius, p. 79 (dies 11/E); Banti 1, Nice F, excellent portrait, attractive dark brown patina, typical tight flan, weight 18.230 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 28 Mar - 2 Jun 193 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT (harmony with the soldiers), Concordia Militum standing half left, head left, legionary aquila (eagle) standard in right hand, signum standard in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field below center; ex CNG e-auction 276 (21 Mar 2012), lot 420 (sold for $2520 including buyer's fees); rare; $1980.00 SALE |PRICE| $1782.00




  







Catalog current as of Friday, February 21, 2020.
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Ancient Roman Coins