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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ GreeceView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of Greece

Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Charles I of Anjou, 1278 - 1285

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Charles I (early 1226/1227 – 7 January 1285), commonly called Charles of Anjou, was a member of the royal Capetian dynasty and the founder of the second House of Anjou. He was Count of Provence (1246–85) and Forcalquier (1246–48, 1256–85) in the Holy Roman Empire, Count of Anjou and Maine (1246–85) in France; he was also King of Sicily (1266–85) and Prince of Achaea (1278–85). In 1272, he was proclaimed King of Albania; and in 1277 he purchased a claim to the Kingdom of Jerusalem.Carlos_I

CR88453. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusades pl. 39, 950; Tzamalis Frankish KA203; Malloy Crusaders 11, VF, toned, small edge cracks, overstruck on an earlier coin(?), weight 0.680 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 270o, Corinth mint, 1278 - 1285; obverse + ▼K• R• PRINC' ACH' (R with wedge shaped foot = Corinth mint), cross pattée; reverse ▼CLARENCIA▼(R with wedge shaped foot = Corinth mint), castle tournois surmounted by cross; scarce variety; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Charles II of Anjou, 1285 - 1289

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Charles II succeeded his father, Charles I, in Achaea as well as Sicily (now reduced to the Kingdom of Naples), but he was a prisoner in Aragonese hands. In the interim, the rule of Achaea devolved upon a series of baillis chosen from the Morean nobility. Not long after his release and coronation in 1289, he granted the Principality to Isabelle of Villehardouin upon her marriage with Florent of Hainaut, in part to redress the greedy application of the Treaty of Viterbo at William's death. However, he retained feudal overlordship over the Principality, and his grant provided that neither Isabelle nor any daughter who was her heir might marry without his consent.Frankokratia_Map

CR88454. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 12; Metcalf Crusades pl. 39, 942; Tzamalis Frankish KA101; Schlumberger XII 17, VF, toned, light marks, weight 0.974 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 90o, Clarentza mint, 1281 - 1289; obverse + • K• R• PRINC ACh• (curly foot R = Clarentza mint), cross pattée; reverse :DE: CLARENCIA: (colons indicate double x stops, DE probably abbreviates denarius, curly foot R = Clarentza mint), castle tournois surmounted by a cross; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Florent of Hainaut, 1289 - 1297

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Florent of Hainaut was Prince of Achaea in right of his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin. He was the son of John I of Avesnes and Adelaide of Holland. From his father he received the stadholdership of Zeeland. After he left Zeeland, he took up service with Charles II of Naples, who made him constable of the Kingdom of Naples. Florent settled with his wife in Morea. He negotiated the Treaty of Glarentsa with the Byzantine Empire in 1290; however, the situation for the Franks in Greece was hopeless by this time. The fall of the Angevins in Sicily meant that they were preoccupied with recouping territory there and few Western governments would send troops to defend Morea. Florent thus made peace and maintained it until 1293, when the Greeks retook Kalamata. Florent did not despair and did not reopen the war which had been ongoing until his succession: he instead sent an embassy in protest to Andronikos II Palaiologos, and the emperor returned Kalamata. In 1296, the Greeks retook the castle of Saint George in Arcadia. Florent besieged the castle, but died before it could be taken.
CR88457. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 13c; Metcalf Crusades type F4, pl. 39, 961, VF, well centered, toned, weight 0.785 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Clarentza mint, 1289 - 1297; obverse + ⚜ FLORENS P Ach B, cross pattée; reverse DE CLARENCIA', castle tournois surmounted by a cross; very rare; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Duchy of Athens, Guy II de La Roche, 1287 - 1308

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Guy II de la Roche was the Duke of Athens from 1287, the last duke of his family. He succeeded as a minor on the death of his father, William I, at a time when the duchy of Athens had exceeded the Principality of Achaea in wealth, power, and importance. Guy was originally under the tutorship and regency of his mother, Helena Angelina Komnene, who was forced to make submission to Isabella of Villehardouin. In 1299, Guy was engaged to Matilda, daughter of Isabella and and her husband, Florent of Hainaut. Charles objected, as his permission had not been sought, but Pope Boniface VIII intervened on the young couple's behalf. In 1307, Guy was made bailli of Achaea by its new prince, Philip I of Taranto. He governed well, but for barely a year. He died, 5 October 1308, at the age of twenty-eight, but was respected and renowned for his chivalry and manners.
CR88462. Billon denier, Metcalf Crusades 1b & pl. 42, 1064; Malloy Crusaders 94, aVF, toned, clashed dies, a little off center, uneven shifted strike, tiny edge split, weight 0.698 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 165o, Thebes mint, majority, 1294 - 1308; obverse +:GVIDVX:ATENES:, cross pattée; reverse :ThEBAHI:CIVIS:, castle tournois, surmounted by cross; $145.00 (€123.25)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Florent of Hainaut, 1289 - 1297

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Florent of Hainaut was Prince of Achaea in right of his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin. He was the son of John I of Avesnes and Adelaide of Holland. From his father he received the stadholdership of Zeeland. After he left Zeeland, he took up service with Charles II of Naples, who made him constable of the Kingdom of Naples. Florent settled with his wife in Morea. He negotiated the Treaty of Glarentsa with the Byzantine Empire in 1290; however, the situation for the Franks in Greece was hopeless by this time. The fall of the Angevins in Sicily meant that they were preoccupied with recouping territory there and few Western governments would send troops to defend Morea. Florent thus made peace and maintained it until 1293, when the Greeks retook Kalamata. Florent did not despair and did not reopen the war which had been ongoing until his succession: he instead sent an embassy in protest to Andronikos II Palaiologos, and the emperor returned Kalamata. In 1296, the Greeks retook the castle of Saint George in Arcadia. Florent besieged the castle, but died before it could be taken.
CR88455. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 13a; Metcalf Crusades variety F2, pl. 39, 956; Schlumberger XII 18, VF, toned, die wear, weight 0.829 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 270o, Clarentza mint, 1289 - 1297; obverse + FLORENS P Ach (curly foot R = Clarentza mint), cross pattée, drooping bell shaped flower with two buds following legend (a pun on the prince's name?); reverse DE CLARENCIA' (curly foot R = Clarentza mint), castle tournois, concave gable, surmounted by a cross; very scarce; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Florent of Hainaut, 1289 - 1297

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Florent of Hainaut was Prince of Achaea in right of his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin. He was the son of John I of Avesnes and Adelaide of Holland. From his father he received the stadholdership of Zeeland. After he left Zeeland, he took up service with Charles II of Naples, who made him constable of the Kingdom of Naples. Florent settled with his wife in Morea. He negotiated the Treaty of Glarentsa with the Byzantine Empire in 1290; however, the situation for the Franks in Greece was hopeless by this time. The fall of the Angevins in Sicily meant that they were preoccupied with recouping territory there and few Western governments would send troops to defend Morea. Florent thus made peace and maintained it until 1293, when the Greeks retook Kalamata. Florent did not despair and did not reopen the war which had been ongoing until his succession: he instead sent an embassy in protest to Andronikos II Palaiologos, and the emperor returned Kalamata. In 1296, the Greeks retook the castle of Saint George in Arcadia. Florent besieged the castle, but died before it could be taken.
CR88456. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 14; Metcalf Crusades type F3(c), pl. 39, 960, VF, toned, tiny edge chip, light deposits, weight 0.792 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 270o, Clarentza mint, 1289 - 1297; obverse + FLORENS P Ach' (A topped with horn-shaped serif), cross pattée; reverse D' CLARENCIA (pin) (A's topped with horn-shaped serif), castle tournois, triangular tower surmounted by cross; very rare; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Florent of Hainaut, 1289 - 1297

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Florent of Hainaut was Prince of Achaea in right of his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin. He was the son of John I of Avesnes and Adelaide of Holland. From his father he received the stadholdership of Zeeland. After he left Zeeland, he took up service with Charles II of Naples, who made him constable of the Kingdom of Naples. Florent settled with his wife in Morea. He negotiated the Treaty of Glarentsa with the Byzantine Empire in 1290; however, the situation for the Franks in Greece was hopeless by this time. The fall of the Angevins in Sicily meant that they were preoccupied with recouping territory there and few Western governments would send troops to defend Morea. Florent thus made peace and maintained it until 1293, when the Greeks retook Kalamata. Florent did not despair and did not reopen the war which had been ongoing until his succession: he instead sent an embassy in protest to Andronikos II Palaiologos, and the emperor returned Kalamata. In 1296, the Greeks retook the castle of Saint George in Arcadia. Florent besieged the castle, but died before it could be taken.
CR88458. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusades type F1; Malloy Crusaders 13b, VF, toned, weight 0.800 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Corinth mint, 1289 - 1297; obverse + :FLORENS: P• Ach• (barred A, R with wedge foot = Corinth mint), cross pattée; reverse DE: CLARENCIA* (barred A's, R with wedge foot = Corinth mint), castle tournois, concave gable surmounted by a cross; very rare; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Despotate of Epirus, Philip I of Taranto, 1294 - 1312

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In 1306 Charles II of Naples gave his son Philip I of Taranto the title "Despot of Romania." Romania referred to Frankish lands previously ruled by the Byzantine Empire (the Romans), including: Albania, Corfu, the Principality of Achaia, the Duchy of Athens, the Duchy of the Archipelago, and the Despotate of Epirus. Coins were struck for Philip with this title at Lepanto (Naupaktos), in Epirus, across the Gulf of Corinth from Patras. In 1313, Philip abandoned his claim to Epirus and claimed the defunct Latin Empire of Constantinople instead as the inheritance of his wife Catherine II of Valois, Princess of Achaea.
CR88459. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusaders DR2(b)ii, p. 43, 1119; Malloy Crusaders 113; Saulcy XV 13, VF, toned, light deposits, irregularly shaped flan with several small edge splits, tiny edge chip, weight 0.825 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 90o, Lepanto (Nafpaktos, Greece) mint, c. 1307 - 1313; obverse + :Ph'S P. ACh' TAR D' R: (Philippus princeps Achaie, Taranti, despotus Romanie, rounded letters, C closed by bar), cross pattée; reverse ⚜ NEPANTI CIVIS (rounded letters, C closed by bar, serif at the foot of V), castle tournois, surmounted by a cross, fleur-de-lis below; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Despotate of Epirus, Philip of Taranto, 1294 - 1313

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Philip received Lepanto in 1294 as a dowry from his wife Thamar. The obverse legend abbreviates Philippus princeps Traranti, despatus. This legend was used before Philip assumed the title Princeps Achaie, c. 1307.
CR88460. Billon denier tournois, Metcalf Crusades DR1(c), pl. 43, 1195, Malloy Crusaders 111b, VF, toned, small edge chip, weight 0.667 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 270o, Lepanto (Nafpaktos, Greece) mint, c. 1294 - 1306; obverse ⚜ + ⚜ Ph'S P TAR DESP: (Philippus princeps Taranti, despatus; angular letters), cross pattée; reverse INEPANTI CIVIS (ivy leaf) (angular letters), castle tournois surmounted by cross; $130.00 (€110.50)
 


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Duchy of Athens, Guy II de La Roche, 1287 - 1308

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Guy II de la Roche was the Duke of Athens from 1287, the last duke of his family. He succeeded as a minor on the death of his father, William I, at a time when the duchy of Athens had exceeded the Principality of Achaea in wealth, power, and importance. Guy was originally under the tutorship and regency of his mother, Helena Angelina Komnene, who was forced to make submission to Isabella of Villehardouin. In 1299, Guy was engaged to Matilda, daughter of Isabella and and her husband, Florent of Hainaut. Charles objected, as his permission had not been sought, but Pope Boniface VIII intervened on the young couple's behalf. In 1307, Guy was made bailli of Achaea by its new prince, Philip I of Taranto. He governed well, but for barely a year. He died, 5 October 1308, at the age of twenty-eight, but was respected and renowned for his chivalry and manners.
CR88461. Billon denier, Metcalf Crusades 1a var., pl. 42, 1059 var.; Malloy Crusaders 93 (does not list varieties); Pylia Hoard -, VF, toned, clashed dies, slight double strike on reverse, bump upper reverse, weight 0.728 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 90o, Thebes mint, majority, 1294 - 1308; obverse + (trefoil or lis?) GVI DVX (rostte) ATENES (closed angular letters), cross pattée; reverse ThEBAHI (rostte) CIVIS (closed angular letters), castle tournois surmounted with a cross; apparently unpublished with these marks and stops; very rare variety; $130.00 (€110.50)
 




  



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REFERENCES

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Friedberg, A. & I. Friedberg. Gold Coins of the World, From Ancient Times to the Present. (2009).
Gamberini, C. Le imitazioni e la contraffazioni monetarie nel mondo. (Bologna, 1971).
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Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Ives, H. The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations. ANSNNM 128. (New York, 1954).
Malloy, A., I. Preston, & A. Seltman. Coins of the Crusader States, 2nd Edition. (New York, 2004).
Marchev, V. & R. Wachter. Catalogue of the Late Byzantine coins, Vol. I, 1082 - 1261 AD. (Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria, 2011).
Metcalf, D. Coinage of the Crusaders and the Latin East in the Ashmolean Museum Oxford. (London, 1995).
Metcalf, D. "The Pylia Hoard: Denier Tournois of Frankish Greece" in MN 17 (New York, 1971).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothèque Nationale. (Paris, 1970).
Paolucci, R. The Coinage of the Doges of Venice, 2nd Edition. (Padova, 2001).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines à l'époque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Schlumberger, G. Numismatique de l'Orient latin. (1878; Supplement 1882; reprinted: Graz, 1954).
Sear, D. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Stahl, A. The Venetian tornesello: A medieval colonial coinage. ANSNNM 163. (New York, 1985).
Tzamalis, A. "Addition to the tornesia of the 1st group of Guillaume de Villehardouin" in NK 11 (1992).
Tzamalis, A. "The first period of the Frankish tornesio. New evidence from an old hoard" in NK 9-10 (1990-1991).

Catalog current as of Monday, March 18, 2019.
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Greek Coins