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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.

Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D., Philadelphia, Cilicia Trachea

|Cilicia|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |late| |May| |238| |A.D.,| |Philadelphia,| |Cilicia| |Trachea||AE| |34|
Philadelphia (Greek: brotherly love) in ancient Cilicia Trachea (later of Isauria) was on the river Calycadnus, above Aphrodisias. Its site is tentatively located near Imsi ren in Asiatic Turkey. Neither Philadelphia in Lydia (Alasehir, Turkey today) nor Philadelphia, in the Decapolis, later Arabia Petraea (Amman, Jordan today) struck coins for Maximinus Thrax.
RB98739. Bronze AE 34, SNG BnF 760, SNG Levante 580, SNGvA 5804, SNG Leypold 2580, Lindgren-Kovacs 786, RPC Online VI T6889, EF, dark patina, pitting, a little off center, weight 14.930 g, maximum diameter 34.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Philadelphia (near Imsi ren, Turkey) mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse AVT K Γ IOVH MAΞIMEINOC, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse ΦILALELFFEΩN KHTIΛOC, Tyche standing left, kalathos on head, grounded rudder in right hand held by tiller, cornucopia in left hand; from the CEB Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell, big 34mm!; $270.00 SALE PRICE $243.00


Gaba, Judaea, 117 - 118 A.D.

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Gaba,| |Judaea,| |117| |-| |118| |A.D.||AE| |15|NEW
Gaba, at the foot of Mount Carmel between Ptolemais and Caesarea, was founded by Herod the Great as a settlement for retired cavalrymen. It is modern day el Harithiye or Tell el-Amir.
RP110526. Bronze AE 15, RPC Online III 3953 (2 spec.); Kindler Gaba 25; Sofaer Collection p. 44 & pl. 41, 5; Rosenberger -, aVF, green patina, earthen deposits, off center, flan a bit ragged, weight 2.694 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Gaba mint, 117 - 118 A.D; obverse ΓABH-NWN, Mn standing facing, looking left, resting on scepter with his right hand, left hand on hip; reverse Tyche standing left, column altar before her, pouring libations from patera over altar with right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ZOP (year 177) lower right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Bagis, Lydia, c. 193 - 268 A.D.

|Other| |Lydia|, |Bagis,| |Lydia,| |c.| |193| |-| |268| |A.D.||AE| |26|
Inscriptions uncovered by Keppel place ancient Bagis near Sirghe on the left (south) side of the Hermos River. Modern scholars pinpoint a site at Gre, Usak Province, Turkey. The "Treasures of Croesus" findings from Lydian tumuli around the town were plundered in the 1960s but recovered by the 2000s and now in the Usak Museum.
RP99127. Bronze AE 26, GRPC Lydia II pl. 29, 36; SNG Cop 45; SNG Mn 45; SNG Tb 3667; BMC Lydia p. 33, 16; Winterthur 3702; Weber 6786; SNGvA -, VF, attractive style, well centered on a tight flan, green patina, weight 9.455 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Bagis (Gre, Turkey) mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse CVNK-ΛHTOC, youthful draped bust of the Roman Senate right; reverse KAICAPEΩN BAΓHNΩN, Tyche standing sightly left, head left, kalathos on head, holding grounded rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 128 - 129 A.D.

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |128| |-| |129| |A.D.||trichalkon|
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem." We think it is unlikely; nevertheless, the type is very popular and somewhat expensive.
GB90244. Bronze trichalkon, RPC Online III 3729, Butcher CRS 266, McAlee 125(d), SNG Hunterian II 2950, F, dark near black patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, weight 5.145 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, reign of Hadrian, 128 - 129 A.D.; obverse ANTIOXEΩN THC MHTPOΠOΛEWC, veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, weak countermark at chin; reverse ram leaping right, looking back, star within crescent above, ET ZOP (year 177 of the Caesarean Era) below; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem), Syria Palestina

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Antoninus| |Pius,| |August| |138| |-| |7| |March| |161| |A.D.,| |Aelia| |Capitolina| |(Jerusalem),| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |23|
Aelia came from Hadrian's nomen gentile, Aelius, while Capitolina meant that the new city was dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus, to whom a temple was built on the Temple Mount. The Latin name Aelia is the source of the much later Arabic term Ilya, a 7th-century Islamic name for Jerusalem.
RP99677. Bronze AE 23, Sofaer 21; Meshorer Aelia 20; SNG ANS 594; BMC Palestine p. 84, 12; Rosenberger I 10; RPC IV.3 T6397 (6 spec.), F, dark patina, scratches, light deposits, weight 11.949 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem) mint, Aug 138 - 7 Mar 161 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS AVG P P P, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse tetrastyle temple, Tyche-Astarte inside central arch standing half left, wearing a short chiton, parazonium at side, right foot on uncertain object (prow?), small bust in right hand, long scepter in left hand, C A C (Colonia Aelia Capitolina) in exergue; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Gadara,| |Decapolis||AE| |18|
Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan), located on a mountain summit about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, was the capital of the Roman province Peraea. The local era of Gadara (Pompeian) began in 64 B.C. Mark (5:1) and Luke (8:26-39) describe the miracle healing of a demoniac (Matthew [8:28-34] says two demoniacs) in the country of the Gadarenes.The Decapolis
RB99934. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online I 4816 (16 spec.); Rosenberger 21; Spijkerman 16; SNG ANS 1294; Sofaer 14, F, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 4.719 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right, date LHP (year 108) before her; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Herennia Etruscilla, Augusta c. July 249 - April/August 253 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria, Syria Palestina

|Judaea| |&| |Palestine|, |Herennia| |Etruscilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |July| |249| |-| |April/August| |253| |A.D.,| |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Samaria,| |Syria| |Palestina||AE| |24|
Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was founded by Herod the Great and named for Caesar Augustus. It was the seat of the Roman procurators and the Roman military headquarters in Judaea. The Pilate Stone, discovered here in 1961, is only archaeological find that names Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. After the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., Caesarea was the provincial capital of the Judaea Province. Well into Byzantine times, Caesarea remained the capital. In the 630s, Arab Muslim armies took the region, but kept Caesarea as its administrative center until early 8th century. Caesarea's ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
RT110024. Bronze AE 24, BMC Palestine p. 35, 172; Kadman II 163; Rosenberger II 134; SNG ANS 833; Sofaer 141; Lindgren I 2427, Choice F, centered on a broad flan, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 10.291 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 225o, Caesarea Maritima (Keisaria, Israel) mint, c. Jul 249 - Apr/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse ERENNIA ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust of Herennia Etruscilla right; reverse COL P F AVG FC CAES METROP, turreted and draped bust of Tyche-Fortuna right; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Esbus, Arabia Petraea

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Esbus,| |Arabia| |Petraea|
In Numbers and Deuteronomy Esbus is the capital of Amorite king, Sihon (also known as Sehon). The biblical narrative records the Israelite victory over Sihon during the time of the Exodus under the leadership of Moses. Moses died soon after the victory, after viewing the "promised land" from the top of Mount Nebo. Esbus is mentioned among the towns of the Roman Arabia Petraea by Ptolemy.
RP110321. Bronze RPC Online VI T9345 (12 spec.); BMC Arabia p. 29, 3; Spijkerman 3; Sofaer 4; SNG ANS -, F, brown patina, porous, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 9.474 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Esbus (Heshbon, Jordan) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AYT C M AVR ANTONINV, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse AYP ECBOYC, front view of shrine with four columns with arcuated lintel between small pediment on each wing, within which Tyche standing facing turreted, head left, holding small bust and spear and placing foot on prow(?); rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Gadara,| |Decapolis||AE| |19|
Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan), located on a mountain summit about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, was the capital of the Roman province Peraea. The local era of Gadara (Pompeian) began in 64 B.C. Mark (5:1) and Luke (8:26-39) describe the miracle healing of a demoniac (Matthew [8:28-34] says two demoniacs) in the country of the Gadarenes.The Decapolis
RP99203. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online I 4816 (16 spec.); Rosenberger 21; Spijkerman 16; SNG ANS 1294; Sofaer 14, F, green patina,earthen deposits, light corrosion, weak legends, weight 6.168 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right, date LHP (year 108) before her; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00




  



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