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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  | 

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.

Amisos, Pontos, 300 - 125 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |300| |-| |125| |B.C.||reduced| |siglos|
Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB93482. Silver reduced siglos, SNG Stancomb 663 var. (different monogram), SNG BM 1113 var. (same), SNGvA 50 var. (same), HGC 7 233 (R1), SNG Cop -, VF/F, well centered, light porosity, weight 3.428 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, magistrate At..., 300 - 125 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hera-Tyche right, wearing low turreted stephanos; reverse owl standing facing on shield, wings open, ATI(?) monogram under left wing; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 (€110.40)
 


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Samosata, Commagene, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Samosata,| |Commagene,| |Syria||AE| |29|
Samosata was an ancient city on the right (west) bank of the Euphrates whose ruins existed at the modern city of Samsat, Adiyaman Province, Turkey until the site was flooded by the newly constructed Atatürk Dam. The founder of the city was Sames, a Satrap of Commagene who made it his capital. The city was sometimes called Antiochia in Commagene and served as the capital for the Hellenistic Kingdom of Commagene from c. 160 BC until it was surrendered to Rome in 72. A civil metropolis from the days of Emperor Hadrian, Samosata was the home of the Legio VI Ferrata and later Legio XVI Flavia Firma, and the terminus of several military roads. Seven Christian martyrs were crucified in 297 in Samosata for refusing to perform a pagan rite in celebration of the victory of Maximian over the Sassanids. It was at Samosata that Julian II had ships made in his expedition against Sapor, and it was a natural crossing-place in the struggle between Heraclius and Chosroes in the 7th century.
RY93572. Bronze AE 29, BMC Galatia p. 122, 56; Butcher 33c; SNG Cop 23 corr. (Philip I), Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait, toned, light deposits, porosity, weight 17.448 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 0o, Samosata (site now flooded by the Atatürk Dam) mint, Jul/Aug 247 - Late 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYAI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse CAMOCATEΩN, city goddess seated left on rock, turreted, veiled, right arm on leg, grain ears downward in right hand, left hand on rock, Pegasus leaping left at feet; ex Roma e-sale 47 (28 Jun 2018), 517; $110.00 (€101.20)
 


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Seleucia on the Calycadnus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Trebonianus| |Gallus,| |June| |or| |July| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.,| |Seleucia| |on| |the| |Calycadnus,| |Cilicia||AE| |33|
Located a few miles from the mouth of the Calycadnus (Göksu) River, Seleucia ad Calycadnum was founded by Seleucus I Nicator in the early 3rd century B.C., one of several cities he named after himself. The location up river was safer against attacks from the sea so Seleucia achieved considerable commercial prosperity as a port for this corner of Cilicia (later named Isauria), and was even a rival of Tarsus. Cilicia thrived as a province of the Romans, and Seleucia became a religious center with a renowned 2nd century Temple of Jupiter. It was also the site of a noted school of philosophy and literature, the birthplace of peripatetics Athenaeus and Xenarchus.
RP88857. Bronze AE 33, SNG BnF 1052 (same dies); cf. SNG Levante 783 (same obv. die, rev. var.); BMC Lycaonia p. 140, 51 (same); SNG Cop 221 (same); SNGvA 5848 (same), F, weak legends, a little off center, scattered porosity, a few pits, bumps and scratches, weight 18.147 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Seleucia on the Calycadnus (Silifke, Turkey) mint, Jun/Jul 251 - Jul/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse AV K ΓAI OVAI TPEBΩ ΓAΛΛOC, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEΛEVKEΩN TΩN Π/POC / TΩ KAΛV, confronted draped busts of Apollo, laureate on left, and Tyche, on right, wearing kalathos, laurel branch before Apollo, cornucopia behind Tyche, KA∆NΩ below; huge 32.8mm bronze; $105.00 (€96.60)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

|Pella|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Pella,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $72.00 (€66.24)
 


Carinus, First Half 283 - Spring 285 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Carinus,| |First| |Half| |283| |-| |Spring| |285| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|NEW
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RX93110. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 4667; Curtis 1929; Geissen 3172; Dattari 5576; BMC Alexandria p. 317, 2448; Kampmann 115.3; Emmett 4012, VF, well centered, flow lines, light corrosion, slightly ragged edge, weight 6.239 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, 29 Aug 282 - first half 283 A.D.; obverse AK M A KAPINOC K, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse Tyche standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, LA (year 1) above left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $60.00 (€55.20)
 


Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior, Pseudo-Autonomous, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Marcianopolis|, |Marcianopolis,| |Moesia| |Inferior,| |Pseudo-Autonomous,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||AE| |20|
Renamed by Trajan after his sister, Ulpia Marciana, Marcianopolis was an important strategic center for centuries. The city was repeatedly destroyed by barbarians (Goths, Huns, Avars and others) but was repeatedly rebuilt and prospered. During Valens' conflict with the Goths, it was a temporary capital of the empire and the largest city in Thrace. An Avar raid destroyed the city in 614 or 615.
RL95898. Bronze AE 20, H-J Marcianopolis 6.0.31.4 (R3), AMNG I/I 539, RPC Online VIII U73840 (3 spec.), VF, green patina, uncleaned, encrustation, off center on a broad flan, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Markianopolis (Devnya, Bulgaria) mint, c. 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.; obverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛIC, turreted and draped bust of Tyche right, kalathos on head; reverse MAPKIANO-ΠOΛEITΩN, Cybele enthroned left, wearing kalathos, phiale in right hand, left elbow on tympanum (drum), two lions flanking throne; $45.00 (€41.40)
 


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Diocletian,| |20| |November| |284| |-| |1| |May| |305| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RX93113. Billon tetradrachm, Geissen 3230; Dattari 5755; Milne 4821; Curtis 2025; SNG Cop 985; BMC Alexandria p. 314, 2523; Kampmann 119.37; Emmett 4182/3 (R1), F, centered on a tight flan, weight 7.447 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 286 - 28 Aug 287 A.D.; obverse A K Γ OYA ∆IOKΛHTIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Tyche standing left, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, LΓ (year 3) right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $40.00 (€36.80)
 







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