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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.

Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 108 - 107 B.C., New Style Silver Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |108| |-| |107| |B.C.,| |New| |Style| |Silver| |Tetradrachm|, |tetradrachm|NEW
The "New Style" tetradrachms were issued by Athens as a semi-autonomous city under Roman rule. The new-style Owls are markedly different from the Owls of Periclean Athens or the "eye in profile" Athena head of the Fourth Century. They were struck on thinner, broad flans, typical of the Hellenistic period, with a portrait of Athena that reflected the heroic portraiture of the period. The owl now stands on an amphora, surrounded by magistrates' names and symbols, all within an olive wreath. The amphora is marked with a letter that may indicate the month of production. Letters below the amphora may indicate the source of the silver used in production.
GS96453. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Thompson Athens 739 - 746, gF, well centered, toned, scratches and bumps, holed and filled, weight 16.206 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, c. 108 - 107 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right, triple-crested helmet decorated with curvilinear ornament on the shell, Pegasus right above the raised earpiece, and protomes of horses above the visor; reverse A-ΘE / EYMH-ΛOΣ / KAΛ/ΛI/ΦΩN / HPA, owl standing right on amphora on its side, head turned facing, wings closed; Tyche (control symbol) on right, standing left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; uncertain letter on amphora, uncertain letters below; all within olive wreath; $350.00 SALE |PRICE| $315.00 ON RESERVE


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D., Antioch, Syria

|Philip| |II|, |Philip| |II,| |July| |or| |August| |247| |-| |Late| |249| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Syria|, |8| |assaria|
Although Philip is portrayed as a young man on this coin, he was a boy, only about 10 or 11 years old, when this coin was struck.
RP94245. Bronze 8 assaria, McAlee 1084 (extremely rare - no plate coin); Butcher CRS 498d; BMC Galatia p. 220, 577; RPC Online VIII - (unassigned; ID 7513, 1 specimen), F, well centered, porous, scratches, light earthen deposits, weight 12.751 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd issue, 247 - 249 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K M IOYΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate and cuirassed bust left, seen from front, wearing balteus, spear in right hand resting on right shoulder, shield on left arm; reverse ANTIOXEΩN MHTPO KOΛΩN, towered, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, ∆ - E / S - C across fields, ram leaping right with head turned back above, star below; only one sale of this type recorded on Coin Archives for the last two decades, one of only three specimens known to Forum; extremely rare; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Hierapolis-Kastabala, Cilicia, 164 - 39 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Hierapolis-Kastabala,| |Cilicia,| |164| |-| |39| |B.C.|, |AE| |21|NEW
Hierapolis-Kastabala was an ancient city in Cilicia Pedias, three kilometers north ancient Pyramus. Alexander the Great stopped at Kastabala before the Battle of Issus in 333 B.C. Antiochus IV (ruled 175 -164 B.C.) refounded the city with the name Hierapolis. In the first century B.C., Hierapolis was the capital of a small local kingdom under the rule of the former Cilician pirate Tarcondimotus I, an ally of Mark Antony. Cicero referred to the city as Rome's most loyal ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people. The city was known for its temple of Artemis Perasia. Strabo wrote of her priestesses who, in a trance, would walk barefoot over hot coals without damage.
GB96794. Bronze AE 21, Ziegler Kilikiens 1274; SNG Levante 1565; SNG Cop 141; BMC Lycaonia p. 82, 1 - 2 var. (bust details); SNG France 2207 - 2209 var. (monogram), VF, centered on a tight flan, dark patina, some porosity, strike a bit flat, edge crack, weight 9.612 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Hierapolis-Castabala (Kirmitli, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse turreted head of Tyche right, two strands of hair down neck, no necklace, monogram behind; reverse city goddess enthroned left, wearing kalathos on head and chiton, short scepter transverse in left hand, eagle standing right below seat, IEPOΠOΛITΩN (of Hierapolis) downward on right, TΩN ΠPOΣ TΩI / ΠYPAMΩI (the Holy [city] on the Pyramus) in two downward lines on left; ex David Wray Collection, ex CNG e-sale 196 (1 Oct 2008), lot 46 (realized $130 plus fees), ex J.S. Wagner Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Seleucia on the Calycadnus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Trebonianus| |Gallus,| |June| |or| |July| |251| |-| |July| |or| |August| |253| |A.D.,| |Seleucia| |on| |the| |Calycadnus,| |Cilicia|, |AE| |33|
Located a few miles from the mouth of the Calycadnus (Göksu) River, Seleucia ad Calycadnum was founded by Seleucus I Nicator in the early 3rd century B.C., one of several cities he named after himself. The location up river was safer against attacks from the sea so Seleucia achieved considerable commercial prosperity as a port for this corner of Cilicia (later named Isauria), and was even a rival of Tarsus. Cilicia thrived as a province of the Romans, and Seleucia became a religious center with a renowned 2nd century Temple of Jupiter. It was also the site of a noted school of philosophy and literature, the birthplace of peripatetics Athenaeus and Xenarchus.
RP88857. Bronze AE 33, SNG BnF 1052 (same dies); cf. SNG Levante 783 (same obv. die, rev. var.); BMC Lycaonia p. 140, 51 (same); SNG Cop 221 (same); SNGvA 5848 (same), F, weak legends, a little off center, scattered porosity, a few pits, bumps and scratches, weight 18.147 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Seleucia on the Calycadnus (Silifke, Turkey) mint, Jun/Jul 251 - Jul/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse AV K ΓAI OVAI TPEBΩ ΓAΛΛOC, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEΛEVKEΩN TΩN Π/POC / TΩ KAΛV, confronted draped busts of Apollo, laureate on left, and Tyche, on right, wearing kalathos, laurel branch before Apollo, cornucopia behind Tyche, KA∆NΩ below; huge 32.8mm bronze; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Amisos, Pontos, 300 - 125 B.C.

|Pontos|, |Amisos,| |Pontos,| |300| |-| |125| |B.C.|, |reduced| |siglos|
Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB93482. Silver reduced siglos, SNG Stancomb 663 var. (different monogram), SNG BM 1113 var. (same), SNGvA 50 var. (same), HGC 7 233 (R1), SNG Cop -, VF/F, well centered, light porosity, weight 3.428 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, magistrate At..., 300 - 125 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Hera-Tyche right, wearing low turreted stephanos; reverse owl standing facing on shield, wings open, ATI(?) monogram under left wing; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

|Pella|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Pella,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |24|
Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |Late| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |AE| |30|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP84971. Bronze AE 30, SNG BnF 2188 var. (same obv. die, no rev. Θ), SNG Cop 330; SNGvA 5355 var. (no Θ's); BMC Lycia p. 274, 51 var. (same), VF, uneven strike with weak areas, bumps and marks, corrosion, weight 12.799 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMH-CCEΩN, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right, •Θ• below; reverse TΩN MEI-ZO-NΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, Θ low center; rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

|Pisidia|, |Termessos| |Major,| |Pisidia,| |Late| |2nd| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|, |AE| |28|
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP85004. Bronze AE 28, BMC Lycia p. 274, 51 var. (leg. also ends in ex.); McClean 9036; SNGvA 5355; SNG Cop 332; SNG Righetti 1445; SNG BnF 2188 var. (Θ below bust), F, centered on a tight flan, light marks, light corrosion, weight 16.613 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEP-MHCCEΩ-N, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right; reverse TΩ-N M-EIZO-NΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |23|
Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
RP84023. Bronze AE 23, BMC Macedonia p. 58, 126 (same obverse die); Varbanov 3268 (R4) var. (obv. legend); Moushmov 6106; SNG Cop -, aVF, attractive portrait, dark patina, porous, central cavities, weight 8.283 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse Λ CEΠT CE-OYHPOC ΠEP A-YΓ (YHP ligate), laureate and draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche of Amphipolis seated left on a throne, wearing kalathos, veil, long chiton and mantle, phiale in extended right hand, star below seat; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

|Amphipolis|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Amphipolis,| |Macedonia|, |AE| |23|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP83502. Bronze AE 23, Varbanov III 3277 (R4); BMC Macedonia p. 59, 128; SNG Hunterian 778; SNG Cop 112 var. (obv. leg.); SNG ANS -, VF, green patina, weight 6.845 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse AVT K - ANTΩNOINOC, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, city goddess enthroned left, wearing turreted crown, patera in extended right hand, left hand at her side; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 




  



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