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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Trajan Decius||View Options:  |  |  | 

Trajan Decius, July 249 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

Trajan Decius, a general under Philip I, successfully crushed the revolt of Pacatian. His troops forced him to assume the imperial dignity and although he still protested his loyalty, Philip advanced against him. Decius was victorious and Philip was killed. The Senate then recognized Decius as Emperor, giving him the attribute Traianus as a reference to that good emperor. As the Byzantine historian Zosimus later noted: "Decius was therefore clothed in purple and forced to undertake the government, despite his reluctance and unwillingness." Decius spent the rest of his short reign combating barbarians. Sometime in the first two weeks of June 251, Trajan Decius and his son Herennius Etruscus became the first Roman emperors to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Herennius died at his father's side, struck by an arrow. Decius survived the initial confrontation, only to be slain with the rest of the army before the end of the day.

Trajan Decius, September 249 - June or July 251 A.D., Augusta, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |September| |249| |-| |June| |or| |July| |251| |A.D.,| |Augusta,| |Cilicia||AE| |19|NEW
Augusta, Cilicia was founded in 20 A.D., and named for Livia (Julia Augusta). Just over 16 km north of Adana in a loop of the river Seyhan (Sarus), and at the west end of a narrow plain bounded to the north and south by low hills. Represented at the Council of Chalcedon in 451, the city probably did not long survive the Moslem invasion of Cilicia in the 7th century. The site, discovered by chance in 1955, was identified by ancient literary sources and from finds there, and in the neighboring village of Gbe, of Roman provincial coins naming the city. Later that same year Gbe, and with it the ruins of Augusta, disappeared below the waters of the Seyhan dam, but not before the site had been partially surveyed. Two colonnaded streets crossed each other at right angles typical of Roman towns in Cilicia. The foundations of a triumphal arch, a theater, a civic basilica, some shops, a bath building, were mapped. These structures were all of brick and mortar, and probably dated to the 3rd century.
RP111040. Bronze AE 19, apparently unpublished; SNG BnF -, SNG Levante -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tahberer -, SNG Pflzer -, BMC Cilicia -, Lindgren -, VF, near centered, dark patina, choice reverse, light marks, weight 4.773 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Augusta (under Seyhan Dam Reservoir) mint, autumn 249 - Jun/Jul 251 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI KYN ∆EKION TPAIANON CEB, laureate head right, light beard; reverse AVΓOVCTANΩN ET ΘKC (of Augustus, year 229), draped bust of ivy wreathed Dionysos right; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare; $250.00 (252.50)


Kingdom of Bosporus, Rheskuporis V, 242 - 276 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Rheskuporis| |V,| |242| |-| |276| |A.D.||stater|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
RP99912. Billon stater, Frolova BAR 166 pp. 137-138, pl. IV, 1227, pl. LXXXI, 21-22; RPC Online IX 179; MacDonald Bosporus 608/1 (Rhescuporis IV); Anokhin 697 (same), VF/gVF, small edge cracks, weight 7.200 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC PHCKOYΠOPI∆, diademed and draped bust of Rheskuporis right; reverse laureate and draped bust of Roman emperor (Philip I or Trajan Decius) right, club handle upward before (control), ςMΦ ([year] 546 [of the Pontic Era]); $125.00 (126.25)


Kingdom of Bosporus, Rheskuporis V, 242 - 276 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Rheskuporis| |V,| |242| |-| |276| |A.D.||stater|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
RP99913. Billon stater, Frolova BAR 166 pp. 138-140, pl. IV, 28-37, pl. LXXXI, 23-25; RPC Online IX 180; MacDonald Bosporus 608/2 (Rhescuporis IV); Anokhin 697a (same), VF, toned, a little off center, weight 7.015 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC PHCKOYΠOPI∆, diademed and draped bust of Rheskuporis right; reverse laureate and draped bust of Roman emperor (Philip I or Trajan Decius) right, six pointed star before (control), ςMΦ ([year] 546 [of the Pontic Era]); $125.00 (126.25) ON RESERVE


Trajan Decius, September 249 - June or July 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Trajan| |Decius,| |September| |249| |-| |June| |or| |July| |251| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|
In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
RY110642. Billon tetradrachm, RPC Online IX 1708; McAlee 1125(b); Prieur 579; Dura Coins 515; BMC Galatia p. 221, 591; McClean 9414, gVF, centered, excellent portrait, toned, slight porosity, weight 10.854 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse AYT K Γ ME KY TPAIANOC ∆EKIOC CEB (Imperator Caesar Gaius Messius Quintus Traianus Decius Augustus), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from behind, four pellets below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing right on palm, head right, wings open wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 519 (29 Jun 2022), lot 302; $120.00 (121.20)


The Coinage of Trajan Decius (A.D. 249 - 251)

|Roman| |Coin| |Books|, |The| |Coinage| |of| |Trajan| |Decius| |(A.D.| |249| |-| |251)|
Please note that if you order 3 or more books and our shopping cart shipping charges add up to an excessive amount, we will reduce the shipping charge and only charge the actual cost of postage!
BL43194. The Coinage of Trajan Decius (AD 249 - 251) by Augustus Brown, published by the author c. 1960, 8vo, paperback, 20 pages plus one plate, priced below FORVM's $5 cost!; $3.00 (3.03)







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

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IMPCAESCMESSTRAIQDECIOAVG
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IMPCDECIVSAVG
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IMPTRAIANVSAVGDECIVS
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REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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