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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ CariaView Options:  |  |  |   

Caria

Caria was a region of western Anatolia extending along the coast from mid-Ionia (Mycale) south to Lycia and east to Phrygia. The Ionian and Dorian Greeks colonized the west of it and joined the Carian population in forming Greek-dominated states there.


Britannicus, Son of Claudius and Messalina, b. 12 February 41 - d. 11 February 55 A.D., Alabanda, Caria

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Of this type, RPC I notes, "Uncertain. This coin was published by Mi 3.307.22, and is known from a Mionnet cast. The coin [the Mionnet specimen] has been tooled ('médaille retourchée') but may perhaps represent a genuine denomination." Our coin allays the RPC I doubts. The denomination is 1/3 of 18.5g RPC I 2818.
SH88430. Orichalcum AE 23, RPC I 2821 (= Mionnet III, p. 307, 22), F, porous, weight 6.496 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alabanda (near Doganyurt, Turkey) mint, 50 - 54 A.D.; obverse KΛAV∆IOC BPETANNIKOC KAIΣAP, bare-headed and draped bust right; reverse AΛABAN∆EΩN, Apollo Kissios standing left, nude, bow in right hand with raven on top, sheep standing left at feet on left ; ex Forum (2013), ex J. S. Wagner Collection; of greatest rarity; $1100.00 (€968.00)


Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 205 - 190 B.C., Civic Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great

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Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece and the principal town of the island is also named Rhodes. The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011. It is located northeast of Crete, southeast of Athens and just off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Rhodes' nickname is The island of the Knights, named after the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, who once conquered it. Historically, Rhodes is famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, a giant bronze statue once standing at the harbor. It was completed in 280 B.C. and destroyed in an earthquake in 224 B.C. No trace of the statue remains today. Historical sites on the island of Rhodes include the Acropolis of Lindos, the Acropolis of Rhodes with the Temple of Pythian Apollo and an ancient theater and stadium, ancient Ialysos, ancient Kamiros, the Governor's Palace, Rhodes Old Town (walled medieval city), the Palace of the Grand Masters, Kahal Shalom Synagogue in the Jewish Quarter, the Archeological Museum, the ruins of the castle of Monolithos, the castle of Kritinia, St. Catherine Hospice and Rhodes Footbridge.
GS87644. Silver tetradrachm, HGC 6 1455 (S); cf. Price 2520 ff. (various magistrates), Muller Alexander 1162 ff. (same), VF/F, well centered, choice obverse, reverse rough with burnished area, scratches and marks, slight double strike, weight 15.795 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 205 - c. 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus seated left on throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, magistrate's name under arm and over rose left, PO (Rhodos) under throne; scarce; $340.00 (€299.20)


Knidos, Karia, 2nd Century A.D.

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"In Roman times Cnidus seems from its scanty coinage to have lost its former importance. Only a few coins exist, Nero to Caracalla..." -- B. V. Head in Historia Numorum
RP86514. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV temp 975 (19 spec.); Nordbø XXIX 1262; SNG Cop 331; BMC Caria p. 97, 97; Lindgren I 639; SNGvA -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of obverse legend, obverse legend weak, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 7.174 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Cnidus mint, legate Eupoleitas, 2nd century A.D.; obverse T K T EΠI EYΠOΛEITA, bearded male head right; reverse flaming column altar, KNI-∆IΩN divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare, none on Coin Archives, RPC lists only three examples sold at auction, the last sold in 2006; $320.00 (€281.60)


Persian Achaemenid Empire, Carian Satrapy, Pixodaros, c. 340 - 335 B.C.

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Pixodarus was the youngest of the three sons of Hecatomnus, all of whom successively ruled. To secure the friendship of Philip II, king of Macedonia, Pixodarus offered his eldest daughter in marriage to his Philip's son Arrhidaeus. Arrhidaeus' ambitious younger brother, Alexander (later Alexander the Great) offered himself instead. Pixodarus eagerly agreed but Philip put an end to the scheme. Pixodarus died, apparently a natural death, before Alexander landed in Asia in 334 B.C. and was succeeded by his Persian son-in-law Orontobates.
SH63582. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 597; SNGvA 2375; SNG Keckman 280; SNG Kayhan 891; SNG Lockett 2913; BMC Caria p. 185, 5 ff.; Weber 6608; SGCV II 4966, aVF, porous, weight 6.541 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Mylasa (Milas, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 335 B.C.; obverse head of Apollo facing slightly right; reverse ΠIΞΩ∆APOY, Zeus Labraundos standing right, labrys (double-headed axe) over shoulder in right, lotus-tipped scepter vertical in left; $240.00 (€211.20)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Antioch ad Maeandrum, Caria

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Antiochia on the Maeander (earlier named Pythopolis) was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia, located between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. It was the site of a bridge over the Maeander. The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yeniser) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydin Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Basaran. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes. It has not been excavated, but Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.
RP87111. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2836 (4 spec.), SNG BnF 144, SNG Fitzwilliam 4672, BMC Caria –, SNGvA –, SNG Cop –, VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, green patina with some flaking, marks, light corrosion, weight 4.570 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 41 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse TIBEPIOΣ KΛAY∆IOΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse MYΩNOΣ ΣYNAPXIA ANTIOXEΩN, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond vertical before her; very rare; $190.00 (€167.20)


Rhodes, Caria, c. 20 - 60 A.D.

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After surrendering its independence to Rome, Rhodes became a cultural and educational center for Roman noble families and was especially noted for its teachers of rhetoric, such as Hermagoras and the unknown author of Rhetorica ad Herennium. At first, the state was an important ally of Rome and enjoyed numerous privileges, but these were later lost in various machinations of Roman politics. Cassius eventually invaded the island and sacked the city. In the early Imperial period Rhodes became a favorite place for political exiles. Early in the 1st century A.D., the Tiberius spent a brief term of exile on Rhodes. Saint Paul brought Christianity to people on the island. Rhodes reached her zenith in the 3rd century.
SH89053. Bronze drachm, RPC I 2764 (5 spec.), SNG Keckman I -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG München -, SNG Tübingen -, BMC Caria -, F, uneven strike with weak areas, spots of corrosion, edge split, weight 24.388 g, maximum diameter 37.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. 20 - 60 A.D.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy; reverse Nike standing left on basis, raising filleted wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, PO∆I/ΩN / EΠI in three lines low on left, ZHNO/∆OTOY (Zenodotos [magistrate]) in two lines on right; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades, we could not find another example online, HUGE 37mm coin; very rare; $180.00 (€158.40)


Augustus and Livia, 17 January 39 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Antioch ad Maeandrum, Caria

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Antiochia on the Maeander (earlier named Pythopolis) was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia, located between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. It was the site of a bridge over the Maeander. The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yeniser) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydin Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Basaran. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes. It has not been excavated, but Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.
RP89904. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2829 (5 spec.), Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 110, 14 corr., VF, slightly off center, a little porous, weight 4.573 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 330o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, 17 Jan 39 B.C. - 19 Aug 14 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ ANTIOXEΩN, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse AΓEΛAOY ΣNAPXIA (Agelaos, head of the Synarchy), draped bust of Livia right, hair in a bun at the back; only three sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $180.00 (€158.40)


Lampsacus, Mysia, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Recent hoard and coin finds prompted Ashton to reattribute this type to the Troad, probably Lampsakos (Ashton Memnon, NC 162 (2002), pp. 11-15). Ashton suggests ME refers to Memnon of Rhodes, that these coins were struck at Lampsakos when he controlled the city and similar coins inscribed EY and NI possibly refer to Memnon's subordinates. Memnon of Rhodes was a prominent Greek commander in the service of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Related by marriage to the Persian aristocracy, he served the Persian king for most of his life. Memnon was arguably the toughest defender to challenge Alexander and was nearly successful in putting a halt to his advance.
GB86134. Bronze chalkous, Ashton Memnon 2 (A1/P2); Ashton Solar p. 30, 1; BMC Caria p. 221, 4; SNG Cop (Caria) 914; Waddington 2813; Traité II 1733, VF, green patina, tight flan, earthen deposits, areas of light corrosion, weight 0.708 g, maximum diameter 8.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lampsacus (near Lapseki, Turkey) mint, under Memnon of Rhodes, c. 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse radiate youthful head of Helios right; reverse rose in profile, M-E flanking low across field; very rare; $140.00 (€123.20)


Kaunos, Caria, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or Later 2nd Century)

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On the Rosetta Stone, "The Memphis Decree" announces Ptolemy V's rule and ascension to godhood, and describes him as "like Horus." In "A Statue of a Hellenistic King," Journal of Hellenistic Studies, 33 (1913), C. Edgar attributes a statue very similar to the reverse figure to Ptolemy V: "[The statue] stands with right foot drawn back, the toes alone resting on the ground...His head is held erect and his gaze is turned slightly to his right. His shoulders are drawn up a little...[the upper part] unnaturally short in proportion to the lower part of the trunk...[The missing right] forearm was clear of the body. The [missing] left hand was raised and probably rested on a spear." We believe this type is from the among the last issues of Kaunos under Ptolemaic rule, struck after the 13 year old Ptolemy V came of age in 197/6 B.C., perhaps to commemorate his accession, and before he sold the city to the Rhodians for 200 talents of silver in 191 B.C.
GB87087. Bronze AE 16, SNGvA 8103; Lindgren III 425; Imhoof-Blumer KM I, p. 138, 1; BMC Caria -; SNG Cop -; SNG Keckman -; SNG München -, VF, green patina, well centered on a tight flan, a little porous/rough, tiny edge crack, weight 2.166 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kaunos (Dalyan, Turkey) mint, c. 197 - 191 B.C. (or later 2nd century); obverse diademed and horned head of Alexander the Great right; reverse youth (Ptolemy V as Horus?) advancing right, nude, long lotus-tipped scepter transverse in left hand, right arm and index finger extended, snake before him coiled around scepter, K-AY (Kaunos) divided high across field, ΣΩ-TAΣ (magistrate) divided across center; very rare; $140.00 (€123.20)


Stratonikeia, Caria, c. 167 - 133 B.C.

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Under the Seleucid kings, Stratonikeia was adorned with splendid and costly buildings. Later in the 3rd century B.C. it was ceded to the Rhodians. Rhodes seems to have then temporarily lost it, possibly during king Philip V of Macedon's Carian campaign (201–198 B.C.), but it retook control of the place in 197 B.C., keeping it until 167 B.C. when the whole of Caria was declared free by the Roman Republic. From this point starts the city's independent coinage, which was to last until the time of Emperor Gallienus (253–268). In 130 B.C., it was at Stratonikeia that the self-proclaimed king Aristonicus made his last stand and was captured in his failed revolt against Rome.
GS89327. Silver hemidrachm, Meadows 68 (O28/R56), SNG Tübingen 3464 (same dies), SNG Keckman -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG München -, BMC Caria -, VF, die wear, scratches, small edge chip, weight 1.127 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, Stratonikeia (Eskihisar, Mugla Province, Turkey) mint, c. 167 - 133 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse CTPATΩN, eagle standing right, head right, wings open, C-T flanking eagle, headdress of Isis lower right, all within square incuse; rare; $120.00 (€105.60)




  






REFERENCES

Akarca, A. Les Monnaies Grecques de Mylasa. (Paris, 1959).
Ashton, R. "Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Earthquake of 229-226 BC" in NC 1986.
Ashton, R. "Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Siege of Mithradates VI" in NC 2001.
Ashton, R. "Rhodian Coinage and the Colossus" in RN 144 (1988).
Ashton, R. "Rhodian coinage in the early imperial period (CH 3: no. 82)" in Recent Turkish Coin Hoards and Numismatic Studies.
Ashton, R. "Rhodian Plinthophoroi-a Sketch" in Kraay-Mørkholm Essays.
Ashton, R. "Rhodian-Type Silver Coinages from Crete" in SM 146 (May 1987).
Ashton, R. "The Coinage of Rhodes 408-c. 190 BC" in Money and its Uses in the Ancient Greek World. (Oxford, 2001).
Ashton, R. "The Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms of Mylasa" in NC 1992.
Ashton, R. & G. Reger. "The Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms of Mylasa Revisited" in Studies Kroll.
Ashton, R. & A.P. Weiss. "The Post-Plinthophoric Silver Drachms of Rhodes" in NC 1997.
Ashton, R., et al. "The Pixodarus Hoard" in Coin Hoards IX (2002).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ). Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Göktürk, M.T. "A Hoard of Hellenistic Silver Coins of Myndos, Halikarnassos, and Knidos" in Studies in Ancient Coinage from Turkey. (London, 1996).
Head, B.V. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Caria, Cos, Rhodes, etc. (London, 1897).
Hurter. S. "Lions and lionesses, eagles and a few heads: a new uncertain mint in Caria" in Essays Hersh.
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münkunde. (Vienna, 1908).
Jenkins, G. K. "Rhodian Plinthophoroi" in Kraay-Mørkholm Essays.
Klein, Dieter. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen, Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Konuk, K. "The Early Coinage of Kaunos" in Essays Price, pp. 197 - 224 and pls. 47 - 50.
Meadows, A.R. "Stratonikeia in Caria: the Hellenistic City and its Coinage" in NC 2002.
Mionnet, T.E. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines, Vol 3: Aeolis - Cyprus. (Paris, 1808).
Numismatik Lanz, Auktion 13: Sammlung Karl, Münzen von Karien. (27 Nov 2006).
Price, M.J. & N. Waggoner. Archaic Greek Silver Coinage, The "Asyut" Hoard. (London, 1975).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2, Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 5: Ionia, Caria and Lydia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 5: Karien und Lydien. (Berlin, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland, The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part 1: Karia. (Helsinki, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge, The Lewis Collection II: The Greek Imperial Coins. (1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey I: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey VIII: Mugla Museum, Vol. 1: Caria. (Istanbul, 2012).
Troxell, H.A. "Carians in Miniature" in Studies Mildenberg.
Troxell, H.A. "Winged Carians" in Essays Thompson.
Yarkin, U. "The Coinage of Syangela in Caria" in NC 1975.
Waggoner, N.M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen. (New York, 1983).

Catalog current as of Thursday, July 18, 2019.
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Caria