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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Macrinus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D.

Macrinus was the Praetorian prefect during the reign of the murderous Caracalla. Macrinus arranged Caracalla's assassination and he and his son Diadumenian seized power and were accepted by the senate. Macrinus concluded an unfavorable peace with the Persians. This disgrace, magnified by propaganda of Julia Maesa, Caracalla's aunt, inspired the Syrian legions to revolt. In the ensuing conflict Macrinus was defeated. He fled, only to be betrayed and executed.

Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Anazarbus, Cilicia

|Cilicia|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Anazarbus,| |Cilicia|, |AE| |35|
Anazarbus was founded by Assyrians. Under the early Roman Empire it was known as Kaicarewn (Caesarea), and was the Metropolis (capital) of the late Roman province Cilicia Secunda. It was the home of the poet Oppian. Rebuilt by the Byzantine emperor Justin I after an earthquake in the 6th century, it became Justinopolis (525); but the old native name persisted, and when Thoros I, king of Lesser Armenia, made it his capital early in the 12th century, it was known as Anazarva.
RP92398. Bronze AE 35, Ziegler 346 (Vs1/Rs6), SNG Levante 1414 var. (rev. leg. arrangement), SNG BnF 2054 var. (same), SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, aF, rough, edge cracks, weight 23.1 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 0o, Anazarbus (Anavarza, Turkey) mint, 217 A.D.; obverse AYT K M OΠ CEY MAKPEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse KAIC TΩN ΠP ANAZ EN∆O-Σ MHTPO PΩM TP, Nike (Victory) advancing left, raising wreath in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left hand, ΓB (chairman of 3 provinces, holder of 2 neocorates) upper left, ETE - ΛC (year 235 of Anazarbus) divided low across field, KEK (the meaning of these letters is unknown) lower left; rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria|, |provincial| |as|
The Battle of Antioch. After Macrinus foolishly cut legionary pay, Legio III Gallica hailed Elagabalus as emperor on 16 May 218. Macrinus sent cavalry but they too joined Elagabalus. Macrinus finally abandoned his pay cut and paid a bonus, but it was too late. Legion II Parthica defected. General Gannys, the commander of Elagabalus' forces, decisively defeated Macrinus was just outside Antioch on 8 June 218. Macrinus shaved off his hair and beard and fled, disguised as a member of the military police. He was recognized by a centurion at Chalcedon on the Bosporus, taken back to Antioch and executed.
RP88069. Bronze provincial as, Butcher 465a (same rev. die), McAlee 34 (v. rare) corr. (obv. leg.), cf. BMC Galatia p. 198, 389, SNG Cop -, VF, dark green patina with reddish earthen highlighting deposits, light scratches and marks, light porosity, weight 4.463 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, group 2; obverse AV K M O C MAKPINOC CE, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse large S C, ∆ E above, eagle right with had left below, all within wreath closed at the top with a star; very rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


|Macrinus|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.|, |denarius|
Annona was worshiped in Rome as the goddess who prospered the year's supply of grain. She was represented on an altar in the capital. The three principal granaries of Rome were Sicily, Egypt, and the African provinces. Annona civilis was the grain which purchased each year by the Roman state, then imported and put into storage, reserved and distributed for the subsistence of the people. Annona militaris was grain appropriated to the use of an army during a campaign.
SH53589. Silver denarius, RIC IV 55 (S), RSC III 8, BMCRE V 6, SRCV II 7330 corr., FDC, fantastic portrait, beautiful gold tone on luster, fine flow lines, full border centering on a broad flan, weight 3.274 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 217 A.D.; obverse IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse ANNONA AVG, Annona enthroned left, wearing turreted crown, grain-ears in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, modius filled with grain and poppies at feet; ex H. S. Perlin Co., 1989; masterpiece portrait with short beard and young features; boldly struck with sharp dies of fine style, fully centered, light golden toning on dazzling mint luster; scarce; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCMOPELSEVMACRINVSAVG
IMPCAESMOPELSEVMACRINVSAVG
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REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Clay, C. "The Roman Coinage of Macrinus and Diadumenian" in NZ 1979.
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4, Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III, Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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