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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Olympians| ▸ |Zeus or Jupiter||View Options:  |  |  |   

Zeus or Jupiter

King of the Gods and ruler of Mount Olympus; god of the sky, and thunder. Youngest son of the Titans Kronus and Rhea. Symbols are the lightning bolt and the eagle.

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
This coin was struck in Bablylon, not long after Alexander the Great died in that city. Alexander was succeeded by the joint reign of his mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and his infant son with Roxana, Alexander IV. This type was struck with the same control symbols in the names of both Philip III and Alexander IV. The two were made joint kings by Alexander's generals who only intended to use them as pawns. Philip III was imprisoned upon his return to Macedonia and in 317 B.C. was executed under orders from Olympias. Alexander IV and his mother Roxana were executed in 311 B.C. by the boy's regent, Kassander.

This coin was struck under one of the Macedonian satraps in Babylon: Archon, Dokimos, or Seleukos I. Perdiccas suspected Archon of colluding in the theft of Alexander's corpse and, in 321 B.C., sent Dokimos to replace him. Archon was defeated and died from battle wounds. Seleucus, made satrap by Perdiccas' rival Antipater, arrived in Babylon in October or November 320 B.C. and defeated Dokimos.
GS111459. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3692, Mller Alexander 1272, Hersh 244, Demanhur Hoard 4479 - 4525, gVF, bold strike with sculptural high relief dies, centered on a tight flan, test cut, weight 17.201 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 323 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞANΔPOY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) in exergue, M (control) lower left, ΛY (control) under throne above strut; from the CEB Collection, ex Edward J. Waddell (Oct 1987); $350.00 SALE PRICE $315.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |IV| |Philopator,| |221| |-| |204| |B.C.||dichalkon|NEW
Ptolemy IV's surname Philopator means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
GP110808. Bronze dichalkon, Lorber CPE B550, Svoronos -, BMC Ptolemies -; Weiser -; SNG Cop -, Noeske -, SNG Milan -, Malter -, aVF, dark green patina, scratches, beveled obv. edge, central cavities, weight 3.114 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, 221 - 204 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, ΣΕ monogram between legs; only one sale (misattributed) of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |III| |Euergetes,| |246| |-| |222| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response, he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch, and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9. The Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power during his reign.
GP111048. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B449; Svoronos 1007; Weiser 109; SNG Cop 646; SNG Milan 201; BMC Ptolemies p. 52, 60; SGCV II 7824, Choice gVF, green patina, well centered, central dimples, obv. edge beveled, weight 6.547 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing diadem and basileion; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, cult-statue of Aphrodite standing facing on base, wearing chiton and polos, holding lotus blossom to breast with right hand, poppies or myrtle branches in left hand; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Roman Republic, Quintus Fabius Labeo, 124 B.C.

|211-100| |B.C.|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Quintus| |Fabius| |Labeo,| |124| |B.C.||denarius|NEW
After 124 B.C., the mark of value is represented either by X (XVI in monogram) or X. The Rostrum on the reverse probably refers to the moneyer's grandfather and namesake and his naval victories in 189-188 B.C. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford
RR111532. Silver denarius, Crawford 273/1, Sydenham 532, RSC I Fabia 1, BMCRR II Italy 494, Russo RBW 1094, SRCV I 148, aVF, light bumps and scratches, a little off center, weight 3.805 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 124 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left in winged helmet, ornamented with griffin head, peaked visor in three pieces, wearing single drop earring and necklace, hair in three locks, ROMA downward behind, X (mark of value) below chin, LABEO upward before; reverse Jupiter in a fast quadriga right, nude to the waist, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, scepter and reins in left hand, war galley ram below horses, QFABI in exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 124 (8 Jan 2023), lot 937 (part of); $180.00 SALE PRICE $162.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.||obol|NEW
Herakles is most often depicted on coinage wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion over his head. The first of Herakles' twelve labors, set by his cousin King Eurystheus, was to slay the Nemean lion and bring back its skin. Herakles discovered arrows and his club were useless against it because its golden fur was impervious to mortal weapons. Its claws were sharper than swords and could cut through any armor. Herakles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight, the lion bit off one of his fingers. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife but failed. Wise Athena, noticing the hero's plight, told him to use one of the lion's own claws to skin the pelt.
GS110757. Silver obol, cf. Price 4007 - 4011, SGCV II 6735 - 6737, VF, dark toning, earthen deposits, obv. off center, light marks, weight 0.546 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Eastern mint, c. 323 - 136 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞANΔ downward on right, no symbol; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Laodicea ad Lycum, Phrygia, c. 189 - 133 B.C.

|Laodicea| |ad| |Lycus|, |Laodicea| |ad| |Lycum,| |Phrygia,| |c.| |189| |-| |133| |B.C.||AE| |13|
Laodicea on the Lycus was on the river Lycus (Curuksu), in Lydia, later the Roman Province of Phrygia Pacatiana, now near the modern city of Denizli, Turkey. It was home to one of the Seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelation. In 2013 the archaeological site was identified as a of World Heritage Site. Its ruins attest to its former greatness. Its many buildings include a stadium, baths, temples, a gymnasium, theaters, and a bouleuterion (Senate House). On the eastern side, the line of the ancient wall may be distinctly traced, with the remains of the Ephesus gate; there are streets traversing the town, flanked by colonnades and numerous pedestals. North of the town, towards the Lycus, are many sarcophagi, with their covers lying near them, partly embedded in the ground, and all having been long since rifled. Laodicea
GB110085. Bronze AE 13, BMC Phrygia p. 283, 24; SGCV 5158; SNGvA -; SNG Cop -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -; Lindgren -, VF, glossy green patina, well centered, weight 1.906 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Lycus (near Denizli, Turkey) mint, c. 189 - 133 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΛAOΔIKEΩN, lotus flower; we did not make an exhaustive search, but we did look online and in the primary references - the BMC Phrygia specimen is the only other specimen we found; extremely rare; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Antioch, Roman Provincial Syria, Re-Issue of Philip Philadelphos Coinage, 47 - 16 B.C.

|Roman| |Syria|, |Antioch,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Syria,| |Re-Issue| |of| |Philip| |Philadelphos| |Coinage,| |47| |-| |16| |B.C.||tetradrachm|NEW
In the initial phases of creating a province on the ruins of the Syrian Kingdom, the Romans kept the old monetary system, the coins of this era being almost exact replicas of those of the last Seleukid King Philip Philadelphos.
RY111451. Silver tetradrachm, RPC I 4140 (10 spec.), Prieur 17, McAlee 17, SNG Cop 5830, HGC 9 1360n, BMC Galatia -, F, centered on a tight flan, weight 13.828 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 26 - 25 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Philip Philadelphos right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ in two lines downward on right ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ / ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ in two lines downward on left, Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, monogram before legs, KΔ (year 24) in exergue; from the CEB Collection; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00 ON RESERVE


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Tyre, Phoenicia, Lifetime Issue

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Tyre,| |Phoenicia,| |Lifetime| |Issue||obol|NEW
After the battle of Issos, Alexander determined to seize the Phoenician coast and eliminate the threat of the Phoenician warships which had served Persia. He asked King Azemilkos of Tyre to allow him to enter the city to sacrifice to the god Melqart. After Azemilkos refused to make this act of submission, in January 332 B.C., Alexander besieged Tyre. The city was taken, after great violence, in September.
GS110745. Silver obol, Price 3253, Newell Ake 15, SNG Cop 1011, Cohen DCA 741, HGC 10 6, gVF, toned, off center, scratch, weight 0.578 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phoenicia, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, struck under Menes, 329 - 328 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), AΛEΞANΔPOY downward on right, Phoenician lower left: AK over 21 ([regnal year] 21 of Azemilkos [King of Tyre]); $140.00 SALE PRICE $126.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Ptolemy| |III| |Euergetes,| |246| |-| |222| |B.C.||diobol|
This XP monogram was later used for Christ.

Ptolemy III Euergetes was the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt. He promoted the translation of Jewish scriptures into Greek as the Septuagint. Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, his eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response, he invaded Syria, occupied Antioch, and even reached Babylon. This war, the Third Syrian War, is cryptically alluded to in Daniel XI 7-9. The Ptolemaic kingdom reached the height of its power during his reign.
GP99077. Bronze diobol, Lorber CPE B397, Svoronos 966 (25 spec.); SNG Cop 176; Weiser 73; BMC Alexandria p. 55 89; Noeske 123; Hosking -, Choice F, well centered, central dimples, weight 21.502 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho monogram between eagle's legs; from a Las Vegas dealer; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Ococlea, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Ococlea,| |Phrygia||AE| |28|
Ococlea was a city of southern Phrygia, believed to have been in the neighborhood of ancient Metropolis (site near Yenikoy, Turkey). The location of the site is uncertain.
RP110428. Bronze AE 28, RPC VII-1 730/2 (same dies); SNG Leypold II 1699; Waddington 6363; VA Phryg I 717, Choice F, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, minor edge splits, weight 10.226 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Ococlea (near Yenikoy, Turkey) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AN ΓORΔIANO-C (Imperator Caesar Marcus Antonius Gordianus), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse OKOKΛIEΩN (N reversed), Zeus seated left on throne, himation around hips and legs and over left shoulder, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand; this is the first coin from Ococlea handled by FORVM; rare; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00




  



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