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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Arabia||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Arabia

Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D., Barbaric Imitative

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.,| |Barbaric| |Imitative||AE| |14|
Aretas IV was the greatest Nabataean king, ruling S. Palestine, most of Trans-Jordan, N. Arabia, and Damascus. Al-Khazneh,one of the most elaborate temples in Petra, is believed to have been the mausoleum of Aretas IV. Paul mentions Aretas in connection with his visit to Damascus (2 Corinthians 11:32). Al-Khazneh, one of the most elaborate temples in Petra, is believed to have been the mausoleum of Aretas IV.
GB94966. Bronze AE 14, Al-Qatanani 141t6 (die match, barbaric style), Meshorer Nabataean 68A; cf. Huth 77 (official style), Barkay CN 150c (same), Schmitt-Korte 38 (same), VF, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, obv. off center, reverse edge beveled, small edge split, weight 1.482 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, unofficial mint, c. 2 - 24; obverse laureate head of Aretas right; reverse two crossed and filleted cornucopias, Nabataean het ros monogram (Aretas) between the horns; from the Ray Nouri Collection; extremely rare; $225.00 SALE PRICE $203.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |14|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94965. Bronze AE 14, cf. Al-Qatanani 178t1; Barkay CN 118a; Huth 82; Meshorer Nabataean 64; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, aVF, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, scratches, remnant of a pre-strike casting sprue, weight 1.710 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Nabataean H (het) left, O (ayin) right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, two pomegranates dangling from tops above center, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' daughter) in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |14|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94969. Bronze AE 14, Al-Qatanani 178; Barkay CN 118b; Meshorer Nabataean 64; Huth 82; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, scratches, flat edge area from sprue cut, weight 1.521 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Nabataean H (het) left, O (ayin) right; reverse two crossed and filleted cornucopias, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' daughter) in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Kanatha, Decapolis, Provincia Arabia

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Kanatha,| |Decapolis,| |Provincia| |Arabia||AE| |17|
Kanatha (or Canatha), 16 miles North of Bostra, is today Qanawat, Syria. It was the Biblical Kenath, which was captured by Nobah from the Amorites (Numbers 32:42 and Judges 8:11) and taken back by Geshur and Aram. The epithet Gabinia (ΓABI in the reverse legend) was probably derived from Gabinius the Proconsul of Syria.
RP99613. Bronze AE 17, SNG ANS 1268; Sofaer p. 154 & pl. 132, 6 ff.; Spijkerman p. 92, 8; Rosenberger IV p. 18, 8, Nice VF, green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse a little off center, weight 2.960 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 0o, Kanatha (Qanawat, Syria) mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse KOMO ANTONC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed right, from behind; reverse ΓABI KANAΘ (A's unbarred, Θ appearing as O), bust of Athena right, draped, wearing crested Corinthian helmet; rare city and coin; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Gadara,| |Decapolis||AE| |19|
Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan), located on a mountain summit about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, was the capital of the Roman province Peraea. The local era of Gadara (Pompeian) began in 64 B.C. Mark (5:1) and Luke (8:26-39) describe the miracle healing of a demoniac (Matthew [8:28-34] says two demoniacs) in the country of the Gadarenes.The Decapolis
RP99203. Bronze AE 19, RPC Online I 4816 (16 spec.); Rosenberger 21; Spijkerman 16; SNG ANS 1294; Sofaer 14, F, green patina,earthen deposits, light corrosion, weak legends, weight 6.168 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right, date LHP (year 108) before her; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |13|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94765. Bronze AE 13, Al-Qatanani 178; Barkay CN 118b; Al-Qatanani 178; Meshorer Nabataean 64; Huth 82; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, F, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 1.812 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Nabataean H (het) left, o (ayin) right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' daughter) in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Gadara, Decapolis

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Gadara,| |Decapolis||AE| |18|
Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan), located on a mountain summit about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, was the capital of the Roman province Peraea. The local era of Gadara (Pompeian) began in 64 B.C. Mark (5:1) and Luke (8:26-39) describe the miracle healing of a demoniac (Matthew [8:28-34] says two demoniacs) in the country of the Gadarenes.The Decapolis
RB99934. Bronze AE 18, RPC Online I 4816 (16 spec.); Rosenberger 21; Spijkerman 16; SNG ANS 1294; Sofaer 14, F, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 4.719 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gadara (Um Qais, Jordan) mint, 44 - 45 A.D.; obverse CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ΓA∆APA, turreted and veiled bust of Tyche right, date LHP (year 108) before her; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Esbus, Arabia Petraea

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Esbus,| |Arabia| |Petraea|
In Numbers and Deuteronomy Esbus is the capital of Amorite king, Sihon (also known as Sehon). The biblical narrative records the Israelite victory over Sihon during the time of the Exodus under the leadership of Moses. Moses died soon after the victory, after viewing the "promised land" from the top of Mount Nebo. Esbus is mentioned among the towns of the Roman Arabia Petraea by Ptolemy.
RP110321. Bronze RPC Online VI T9345 (12 spec.); BMC Arabia p. 29, 3; Spijkerman 3; Sofaer 4; SNG ANS -, F, brown patina, porous, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 9.474 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 180o, Esbus (Heshbon, Jordan) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AYT C M AVR ANTONINV, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear; reverse AYP ECBOYC, front view of shrine with four columns with arcuated lintel between small pediment on each wing, within which Tyche standing facing turreted, head left, holding small bust and spear and placing foot on prow(?); rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |14|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94963. Bronze AE 14, Al-Qatanani 178t1; Barkay CN 118a; Huth 82; Meshorer Nabataean 64; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, F, black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 2.189 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 270o, Petra (Jordan) mint, spring 5 - spring 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, Nabataean H (het) left, O (ayin) right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, two pomegranates dangling from tops above center, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' daughter) in center; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Nabataean Kingdom, Aretas IV and Phasael, 9 B.C. - 40 A.D.

|Nabataean| |Kingdom|, |Nabataean| |Kingdom,| |Aretas| |IV| |and| |Phasael,| |9| |B.C.| |-| |40| |A.D.||AE| |13|
Possibly struck in the year of Christ's birth! Jesus was born sometime between 6 B.C. and 4 B.C. Matthew describes King Herod as the ruler during the time of the Nativity, and Herod died in 4 B.C. Later, in order to kill Jesus and eliminate him as a rival king, Herod ordered the "Massacre of the Innocents" - the killing of all male children in Bethlehem aged two years and under. This means that Jesus may have been up to two years old already by that time, and this also sets the Nativity between 6 and 4 B.C. This type was issued in the names of Aretas IV and his daughter Phasael, 5 - 4 B.C.
GB94971. Bronze AE 13, Al-Qatanani 178t1; Barkay CN 118a; Huth 82; Meshorer Nabataean 64; BMC Arabia p. 10, 35; SNG ANS 6 -, F, heavy earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse off center, weight 2.604 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Aretas right, 2 pomegranates hanging down, Nabataean H (het) left, o (ayin) right; reverse two cornucopias crossed and filleted, two pomegranates dangling from tops above center, Nabataean PS (peh sade) monogram (Phasael, Aretas' daughter) in center; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00




  



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REFERENCES

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Barkay, R. "The Coinage of the Last Nabataean King, Rabbel II (AD 70/1-105/6)" in NC 174 (2014), pp. 29 - 44, pl. 6 - 7.
Barkay, R. The Coinage of the Nabataeans. Qedem 58. (Jerusalem, 2019).
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Schmitt-Korte, K. "Nabatean Coinage - Part II. New Coin Types and Variants" in NC 1990, pp. 105 - 133, pl. 10 - 15.
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