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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Gordian III||View Options:  |  |  | 

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

Gordian III was the grandson of Gordian I and nephew of Gordian II. He was proclaimed Caesar shortly before the murder of Balbinus and Pupienus, and he succeeded them. Little is known about his reign. In 242 A.D. he embarked on a campaign against the Persian Kingdom which was so successful the Persians had to evacuate Mesopotamia. However, Gordian III died shortly after, through illness or the machinations of his Praetorian prefect and successor, Philip I.

Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Neocaesarea, Pontus

|Pontos|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Neocaesarea,| |Pontus||AE| |28|
Neocaesarea (modern Niksar, Turkey) was a favorite residences of Mithridates the Great and later of King Polemon and his successors. Pompey made it a city and gave it the name of Diopolis, while Pythodoris widow of Polemon, made it her capital and called it Sebaste. Judging from its coins the city was probably renamed Neocaesarea during the reign of Tiberius. In 344 and again in 499 the city was destroyed by an earthquake.
RP110054. Bronze AE 28, RPC Online VII-2 2830 (10 spec.); Rec Gn I p. 93, 51; SNG Cop 218; SNGvA 6765; Waddington 77; Cizmeli 352, gF, green patina, well centered, porosity, weight 14.615 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Neocaesarea (modern Niksar, Turkey) mint, 241 - 242 A.D.; obverse AY K M ANT ΓOP∆IANO CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the rear; reverse KOI ΠONT MH NEOKAICAPIAC, prize table with curved legs holding agonistic crown with palm, ET / PO / H (year 178) in three lines between legs; $130.00 SALE PRICE $117.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia

|Bithynia|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Nicaea,| |Bithynia||AE| |18|
The first ecumenical council of the Christian church was held in Nicaea by Constantine in 325.
RP97864. Bronze AE 18, BMC Pontus p. 172, 123; Rec Gen II.3 p. 489, 713; RPC VII.2 U19873; Mionnet Sup V 865; SNGvA 653; cf. SNG Cop 526 (no eagle, three with wreath), Choice VF, green patina, slight porosity, light earthen deposits, weight 3.175 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Nicaea (Iznik, Turkey) mint, 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AV, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse legionary aquila (eagle) between two legionary standards each topped with a wreath, N-IK-AI-E/ΩN in two lines the first above the exergue line divided by the shafts, the last two letters in exergue; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


|Gordian| |III|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.||denarius|
Apart from the common, large issues of 240 A.D., Gordian III also struck exceedingly small quantities in 238 and 239 A.D. We only know one other coin of this Jupiter type, an ex Forum coin in the Michael Mihalka collection. Other types known by just two or three specimens are Fides, Liberalitas and Victory.
SH53566. Silver denarius, RIC IV -, RSC IV -; cf. RIC IV 16 (antoninianus), RSC IV 189 (same), Choice VF, weight 2.653 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 239 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P II COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for two years, consul, father of the country), Jupiter standing slightly left, nude but for cloak over arms, thunderbolt in right, long scepter in left hand, small figure of Gordian III at his feet left; extremely rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCMANTGORDIANVSAVG
IMPCAESGORDIANVSPIVSAVG
IMPCAESMANTGORDIANVSAVG
IMPCAESMANTGORDIANVSPIVSAVG
IMPGORDIANVSPIVSFELAVG
IMPGORDIANVSPIVSFELIXAVG
MANTGORDIANVSCAES


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Michaux, B. Le monnayage imprial de Gordien III (238-244 aprs J.C.). (Bruxelles, 2020).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III: Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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