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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Cappadocia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Cappadocia

Cappadocia is in eastern Anatolia, in the center of what is now Turkey. After ending Persian rule, Alexander the Great intended to rule Cappadocia through one of his military commanders, but Ariarathes, a Persian aristocrat, somehow made himself king of the Cappadocians. Ariarathes I was successful and extended the borders of the Cappadocian Kingdom as far as the Black Sea. After Alexander's death, Perdiccas designated Eumenes to rule the area. Ariarathes was defeated, captured and crucified, but due to Macedonian infighting Ariarathes' son recovered his inheritance. He left the kingdom to a line of successors, who mostly bore the name of the founder of the dynasty. Under Ariarathes IV, Cappadocia became an ally of Rome. The kingdom maintained independence until A.D. 17, when the Tiberius reduced Cappadocia to a Roman province.

Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Caesarea,| |Cappadocia||drachm|
Mount Erciyes (Argaios to the Greeks, Argaeus to the Romans) is a massive stratovolcano 25 km to the south of Kayseri (ancient Caesarea) in Turkey. The highest mountain in central Anatolia, with its summit reaching 3,916 meters (12,848 ft). It may have erupted as recently as 253 B.C., as may be depicted on Roman era coins. Strabo wrote that the summit was never free from snow and that those few who ascended it reported seeing both the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean Sea to the south in days with a clear sky.
RS99253. Silver drachm, Sydenham Caesarea 401 var. (laur. head r.); SNGvA 6467 var. (same); BMC Galatia p. 74, 228 var. (same, leg.); SNG Tub -; SNG Hunt -; SNG Cop -, VF, surface a little grainy, broad oval flan, edge chip, small edge cracks, weight 2.452 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 206 - 207 A.D.; obverse AY KAI Λ CEΠ CEOYHPOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse MHTPO KAICAP NEΩ, Mount Argaeus surmounted by a star; ET IE (year 15) in exergue; apparently unpublished extremely rare bust variation; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Kings of Cappadocia, Ariarathes V Eusebes Philopator, c. 163 - 130 B.C.

|Cappadocian| |Kingdom|, |Kings| |of| |Cappadocia,| |Ariarathes| |V| |Eusebes| |Philopator,| |c.| |163| |-| |130| |B.C.||AE| |15|
Ariarathes V Eusebes was known for his excellent character and cultivation of philosophy and liberal arts. Some historians name him as the greatest Cappadocian king. He was the son of Ariarathes IV and Antiochis (daughter of the Seleucid King Antiochus III). On the advice of Rome, he rejected marriage with Laodice V, the sister of Demetrius I Soter. Demetrius made war upon Ariarathes, deprived him of his kingdom, and put his brother on the throne. The Romans restored Ariarathes' to his throne. In 154, Ariarathes assisted Attalus II of Pergamon in his war against Prusias II of Bithynia. In 130, Ariarathes was killed while supporting the Romans in their war against Aristonicus of Pergamon. In return for the assistance that cost his life, Rome added Lycaonia and Cilicia to the dominions of his family.
GB99181. Bronze AE 15, Simonetta p. 79, 1a (Ariarathes IV - VII); BMC Galatia p. 43, 4 (Ariarathes X); HGC 7 814 (R2) var. (serrate edge);, F, dark green patina, earthen deposits, scratches, weight 3.745 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, c. 163 - 130 B.C.; obverse zebu (humped bull) standing right; reverse BAΣIΛ APIAPA, bow in gorytos (bow case and quiver); ex CNG e-auction 496 (21 Jul 2021), lot 176; very rare; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Eusebeia (Caesarea), Cappadocian Kingdom, Reign of Archelaus, c. 36 B.C. - 17 A.D.

|Cappadocia|, |Eusebeia| |(Caesarea),| |Cappadocian| |Kingdom,| |Reign| |of| |Archelaus,| |c.| |36| |B.C.| |-| |17| |A.D.||AE| |15|
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). In Strabo's time the city had been renamed Eusebeia to honor the Cappadocian King Ariathes V Eusebes, who ruled 163 - 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. After the Muslim conquest, Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri.
GB98214. Bronze AE 15, Ganschow, type 5c, 53; SNGvA 6336; SNG Tbingen 4615; cf. Sydenham Caesarea 19 ff. (controls); SNG Cop 168 (same); BMC Galatia p. 46, 9 (same), aVF, green patina, porosity/light corrosion, tiny edge splits, weight 2.376 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 36 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse head of Tyche right, wearing turreted helmet/crown with crest; reverse palm frond upright, EVΣE-BEIAΣ in two downward lines the first on the right, T (control) outer left, ∆ (control) outer right; rare; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00







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REFERENCES

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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, [etc.]. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 7: Asia Minor: Lycia - Cappadocia. (London, 1967).
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Catalog current as of Thursday, May 26, 2022.
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