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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ CologneView Options:  |  |  |   

Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany)

Colonia Agrippinensis established a mint under Postumous and struck for the subsequent Romano-Gallic usurpers.


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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The Rhine and the Danube formed most of the northern inland frontier of the Roman Empire.
RA72656. Billon antoninianus, Cunetio 2371, RSC IV 355b, Schulzki AGK 88c, RIC V-2 87, SRCV III 10991, Elmer 123, Hunter IV - (p. lxxxviii), gVF, reverse scratches, weight 3.812 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 1st emission, 2nd phase, 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS PROVINCIARVM (health of the provinces), river-god Rhenus (Rhine) reclining left, horned, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, resting right forearm on prow of a boat, reed cradled in left hand and arm, left elbow resting on urn behind; $120.00 (102.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Deusoniensis probably refers to modern Deutz, on the Rhine across from Cologne. Apparently, Hercules was worshiped there and it has been suggested that Postumus was born in the town. From these relatively obscure provincial origins, Postumus would have risen through the ranks of the army until he held command of the Roman forces "among the Celts." What his precise title was is not definitely known, though he may have been promoted by Valerian to imperial legate of Lower Germany. Postumus was evidently in favor at Valerian's court, and may even have been granted an honorary consulship.
RS64647. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 91a, RIC V-2 64, Mairat 13, Schulzki AGK 25, Elmer 124, Hunter IV 14, SRCV III 10944, aVF, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse HERC DEVSONIENSI (to Hercules of Deuson), Hercules standing slightly right, head right, nude, resting right hand on grounded club behind, bow in left hand, Nemean lion skin draped over his left arm; $70.00 (59.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS64649. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 9, Elmer 586, RIC V-2 287, RSC IV 31a, Mairat 168 - 171, Hunter IV 42, SRCV III 10932, Cunetio -, gVF, much silvering, edge cracks, weight 2.859 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COS IIII (consul for the 4th time), Victory standing right, raising wreath in right hand, long grounded palm frond in right hand before her; $50.00 (42.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Uberitas is the personification of fruitfulness, primarily agricultural fertility.
RS64676. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 366a, RIC V-2 330, Mairat 136, Schulzki AGK 94, Hunter IV 93, SRCV III 10995, VF, well centered, toned, small edge cracks, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VBERTAS AVG (to the abundance of the Emperor), Uberitas standing facing, head left, right leg forward, purse in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $50.00 (42.50)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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The reverse may commemorate Gallienus' victory over the Alemanni at Milan in 259 A.D.
RA64633. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 872d, RIC V-1 J18 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 308 (Lugdunum), SRCV III 10225, VF, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GERMANICVS MAX V, two captives seated back-to-back flanking the foot of a trophy of captured arms, their arms tied behind their backs; scarce; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Although Ares was viewed by the Greeks primarily as destructive and destabilizing, worthy of contempt and revulsion, for the Romans, Mars was a father (pater) of the Roman people. He was the father of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. In early Rome, he was second in importance only to Jupiter, and the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began and ended the season for military campaigning and farming.
RS64642. Silver antoninianus, RIC V-2 57, RSC 273a, Schulzki AGK 64, Elmer 332, Cunetio 2406, Hunter IV 4, SRCV III 10974, VF, excellent centering, toned, nice style, slight porosity, edge cracks, weight 3.442 g, maximum diameter 21.618 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 263 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars walking right, helmeted, nude but for cloak tied at waist and flying behind, spear transverse in right hand, trophy over left shoulder in left hand; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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In 267 A.D., the Goths, originally from Scandinavia, along with the Sarmatians, originally from the area of modern Iran, first invaded the Empire. They ravaged Moesia, Thrace, the Balkans and Greece. In southern Greece, the cities they sacked included Athens, Corinth, Argos and Sparta. An Athenian militia force of 2,000 men, under the historian Dexippus, pushed the invaders north where they were intercepted by the Roman army under Gallienus. Gallienus defeated them near the Nestos River, on the boundary between Macedonia and Thrace.
RS64645. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 331a, RIC V-2 325, Hunter IV 79, Elmer 593, Mairat 143, Schulzki AGK 77, Cunetio 2444, SRCV III 10983, VF, well centered, sightly porous, weight 4.506 g, maximum diameter 21.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from the front; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS (era of good fortune), Postumus standing right, bare-headed, wearing military attire, transverse spear in right hand, globe in extended left hand; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RS64648. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 309, RSC IV 159a, Hunter IV 57, Cunetio 2449, Elmer 563, Mairat 149 - 153, Schulzki AGK 38a, SRCV III 10954, VF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, small edge crack, some porosity, weight 3.149 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 45o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 265 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI STATORI (to Jove who upholds), Jupiter standing slightly left, nude, head right, long scepter in right hand, thunderbolt cradled in left arm; $45.00 (38.25)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS64718. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 868h, RIC V-1 12, RSC IV 143a, Hunter IV 53, SRCV III 9952, VF, excellent portrait, toned, well centered on a tight, slightly oval flan, deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.908 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ORIENS AVGG (the rising sun of the two emperors), Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, left arm and flying behind, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left hand; $45.00 (38.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Neptune was the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion. He is the counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon. In the Greek-influenced tradition, Neptune was the brother of Jupiter and Pluto; the brothers presided over the realms of Heaven, the earthly world, and the Underworld. Salacia was his consort. Neptune was likely associated with fresh water springs before the sea. Like Poseidon, Neptune was worshiped by the Romans also as a god of horses, under the name Neptunus Equester, a patron of horse-racing.
RS64643. Silver antoninianus, RIC V-2 76, RSC IV 205a, Mairat 51-55, Schulzki AGK 46, Elmer, 314, Cunetio 2398, Hunter IV 24, SRCV III 10963, aVF, nice portrait, centered, area of corrosion, die wear, small edge cracks, weight 3.998 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 30o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and falling behind, dolphin in right hand, trident vertical behind in left hand, prow left at feet on left; $40.00 (34.00)




  



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Catalog current as of Friday, September 21, 2018.
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Colonia Agrippinensis