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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Health||View Options:  |  |  | 

Health (Hygieia or Salus)

Hygieia (also Hygiea or Hygeia, in Latin Hygea or Hygia), was the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation. While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health. Her name is the source of the word "hygiene." She was imported by the Romans as the Goddess Valetudo, the goddess of personal health, but over time she was increasingly identified with the ancient Italian goddess of social welfare, Salus.

Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D.

|Maximinus| |I|, |Maximinus| |I| |Thrax,| |20| |March| |235| |-| |Late| |May| |238| |A.D.||denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS112632. Silver denarius, RSC III 85, RIC IV 14, BMCRE VI 21, SRCV III 8304, Choice EF, mint luster, flow lines, well centered, edge ragged (as usual for the issue), weight 3.326 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Mar 235 - Jan 236 A.D.; obverse IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse SALVS AVGVSTI (to the health of the Emperor), Salus seated left, from patera feeding snake coiled around altar, left elbow resting on back of throne; from the Collection of Dr. Jregen Buschek; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.||aureus|
Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

On the Certificate, David Sear notes, "a very rare obverse variant and an excellent example of the early "Trajanic" style of Hadrian's portraiture."
SH24853. Gold aureus, BMCRE III p. 250, 84 note; RIC II 46 var. (bust right), Cohen II 1368 var. (same), Choice VF, weight 7.124 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 118 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust left; reverse P M TR P COS II, Salus seated left, feeding snake coiled around altar, SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor) in exergue; ex Freeman and Sear; very rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

|Nero|, |Nero,| |13| |October| |54| |-| |9| |June| |68| |A.D.||aureus|
To celebrate his escape from the Pisonian conspiracy and assassination attempt in 65 A.D., Nero constructed a temple to Salus, the Roman goddess of health and safety, and honored her on the reverse of his coins.
SH38942. Gold aureus, RIC I 59, Cohen I 313, BnF II 225, SRCV I 1932, gF, weight 7.092 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 65 - 66 A.D.; obverse NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse Salus seated left on high back throne, patera in right, SALVS (health) in exergue; SOLD


Pescennius Niger, April to 1 June 193 - March, April or May 194 A.D.

|Pescennius| |Niger|, |Pescennius| |Niger,| |April| |to| |1| |June| |193| |-| |March,| |April| |or| |May| |194| |A.D.||denarius|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH33752. Silver denarius, RIC IV 77, Cohen III 68, VF, porous, weight 2.444 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVSTI AVG, laureate head right; reverse SALVTI AVGVSTI, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in right from patera in left, altar at feet; well centered; rare; SOLD


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

|Magnentius|, |Magnentius,| |18| |January| |350| |-| |10| |August| |353| |A.D.||reduced| |double| |maiorina|
"I am the alpha and the omega" is an appellation of Jesus in the Book of Revelation (verses 1:8, 21:6, and 22:13). Alpha (A) and omega (Ω) are respectively the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet. This would be similar to referring to someone in English as the "A and Z." Thus, twice when the title appears it is further clarified with the additional title "the beginning and the end" (Revelation 21:6, 22:13). The first and last letters of the Greek alphabet were used because the Book of Revelation was originally written in Greek.
SH34852. Bronze reduced double maiorina, RIC VIII Trier 320 (without pellet in ex) or 323 (with pellet in ex.), VF, weight 6.842 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 352 - 353 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS DD NN AVG ET CAES (the salvation of our noble emperor and caesar), large Christogram flanked by A Ω, TRP(pellet?) in exergue; SOLD


Caligula, 16 March 37 - 24 January 41 A.D., Carthago Nova, Hispania Tarraconensis

|Hispania|, |Caligula,| |16| |March| |37| |-| |24| |January| |41| |A.D.,| |Carthago| |Nova,| |Hispania| |Tarraconensis||provincial| |as|
In older references the bust of Salus is identified as that of Caesonia, 4th wife of Caligula. The female bust has also been identified as Antonia by Grant and Livia by Etienne. Beltran identifies Salus as the tutelary goddess of Carthago Nova and does not link the features to any member of the royal family.

Struck under duumvirs quinquennals: Cnaeus Atel. Flac. and Cnaeus Pom. Flac.
RB90608. Bronze provincial as, Villaronga-Benages 3155, RPC I 185, SNG Cop 503, SNG Munchen 72, Villaronga 1127, Burgos 613, Vagi 563, F, clear portraits, partial legends, areas of verdigris, pitting, weight 12.563 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 135o, Carthago Nova (Cartagena, Spain) mint, c. 40 A.D.; obverse C CAESAR AVG GERMANIC IMP P M TR P COS, laureate head of Caligula right; reverse CN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR Q V I N, draped bust of Salus (Caesonia as Salus?) right, SAL - AVG across fields; ex Stacks Coin Galleries auction, Sep 2008, lot 350; ex Tinchant; rare; SOLD


Florianus, June or July - August or September 276 A.D.

|Florianus|, |Florianus,| |June| |or| |July| |-| |August| |or| |September| |276| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
SH16877. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC T4160 (this coin, the only spec. listed), RIC V-1 93 (legend not listed), Estiot pp. 336 - 337 (legend not listed with this bust type), Choice VF, weight 3.629 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 1st issue, Jul 276 A.D.; obverse IMP M ANNIVS FLORIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS PVBLI, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in both hands; from the Martin Griffiths Collection; the only known specimen; SOLD


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.; EQVITI Series II of Ticinum, V, TXXI

|Probus|, |Probus,| |Summer| |276| |-| |September| |282| |A.D.;| |EQ<u>V</u>ITI| |Series| |II| |of| |Ticinum,| |<u>V</u>,| |TXXI||antoninianus|
Ticinum mint EQVITI series II - click AEQVITI to read the NumisWiki article, "Coins of Probus with Coded Markings of EQVITI Embedded in the mint mark." The letter "V" in the reverse field is the third letter of the codeword EQVITI. The letter "T" in the exergue indicates this coin was struck by the third officina (mint workshop). The letters of the word EQVITI are coded in the mint marks of coins from all the officinae of the mint, with the specific letters of the codeword assigned to each officina in order corresponding with their officina numbers. This codeword probably refers to cavalry. It may be AEQVITI truncated because there were only six officinae in operation.
RA25952. Billon antoninianus, RIC V-2 500G, Pink VI/1 p. 55, Cohen VI 584, cf. Hunter IV 161 (star right, 282 A.D.), gem EF, weight 3.973 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 9th emission, 281 A.D.; obverse VIRTVS PROBI AVG (the valor of Emperor Probus), helmeted, radiate and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder, shield on left; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing right feeding snake held in arms, V left, TXXI in exergue; ex Kunker, auction 111 (18 Mar 2006), 7026; SOLD


Nerva, 18 September 96 - 25 January 98 A.D., Ancient Counterfeit

|Counterfeits|, |Nerva,| |18| |September| |96| |-| |25| |January| |98| |A.D.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||denarius|
Small bumps are often found on fouree denarii. They are normally about 2-3 mm in diameter, sometimes open revealing rich copper salts or, after cleaning, the copper core. These bumps are created by chemical reactions ocurring in between the copper core and the silver plate. The bump on this coin is by far the largest we have seen.
RS32178. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC II 20, RSC II 134, BMCRE III 48 (official, Rome mint), F, weight 3.019 g, maximum diameter 17.1 mm, die axis 270o, illegal mint, after 97 A.D.; obverse IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR P COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse SALVS PVBLICA (health of the public), Salus seated left, heads of grain in right, left elbow on throne; SOLD







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