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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Late Empire| ▸ |Valentinian III||View Options:  |  |  | 

Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

Placidus Valentinian III was the weak-willed ruler of the Western Empire for thirty-three years. At six, he was made Caesar on 23 October 425 A.D. Dominated successively by his sister Galla Placidia, and then the famed General Aetius, Valentinian III exercised little power of his own. The only notable event of his reign was the defeat of Attila the Hun by Aetius at the Battle of Mauriacus. Valentinian was assassinated in 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
As Rome's power decreased, the burden of taxation became more and more intolerable for the remaining western provinces. These higher taxes seriously impaired loyalty of the remaining provinces contributing to downward spiral.
SH53623. Gold solidus, RIC X Theodosius II 302, gVF, weight 4.468 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 443 - 450 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTIN-IANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, spear over shoulder, shield in left decorated with horseman trampling fallen foe; reverse IMP XXXX II COS XVII P P, Constantinopolis enthroned left, wearing helmet, globus cruciger in right hand, scepter in left hand, shield resting at side of throne, star left, COMOB in exergue; SOLD


|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||tremissis|
Obverse legend unlisted in RIC. Exergual mark COMOB with the center of the M filled on the die, resulting in "TT". Lettering style and portrait is cruder than other Ravenna mint issues. Possibly Vandalic?
SH53627. Gold tremissis, RIC X, -- (cf. RIC X, 2058-2074 for series, most similar to RIC X, 2069); Lacam FIN, Vol II, Pl. 23, 40 (same dies); Depeyrot 18/1 var., EF, weight 1.484 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna mint, c. 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTINIANVS P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse small cross within wreath, COMOB in exergue; ex NAC 27, 2004, lot 537; very rare variety; SOLD


Valentinian III, 23 October 425 - 16 March 455 A.D.

|Valentinian| |III|, |Valentinian| |III,| |23| |October| |425| |-| |16| |March| |455| |A.D.||solidus|
"The 'Solidus' was a revision instituted about 310 by Constantine I to the Roman gold coin standard, the 'aureus'. The aureus weight had fluctuated but settled at five to the Roman ounce, which meant that it was not a standard weight since the Romans had no name for a fifth of an ounce. Constantine I struck solidi at six to the ounce, which equaled the Roman weight unit of the 'sextula'. Solidi were struck at about 98% fineness and were 20-21 mm's in diameter. With the defeat of the Licinii by Constantine in 324 the solidus became the standard Roman gold coin and remained so for over 600 years." - from Moneta Historical Research by Tom Schroer
SH26056. Gold solidus, RIC X Valentinian III 2018, Cohen VIII 19, SRCV 4310, EF, weight 4.408 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 195o, Ravenna mint, c. 430 - 455 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VALENTI-NIANVS P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), Valentinian standing facing, foot on the head of a man-faced snake with closed coil, holding long cross and Victory on globe, R left, V right, COMOB in exergue; SOLD


Vandal Kingdom, North Africa, c. 429 - 534 A.D., Imitative of Valentinian III

|Germanic| |Tribes|, |Vandal| |Kingdom,| |North| |Africa,| |c.| |429| |-| |534| |A.D.,| |Imitative| |of| |Valentinian| |III
||nummus|
In spring 429, the Vandals invaded North Africa. Under the influence of his rival general Atius, Valentinian III's mother, Galla Placidia, had the Roman governor and general Bonifacius convicted of treason. Rather than surrender for execution, Bonifacius revolted and sought support from Vandal mercenaries in Hispania. Bonifacius made peace with Galla Placidia, but it was too late. King Genseric and the entire Vandal kingdom migrated en masse into Africa and took it with a force of 80,000 men. The Vandals would rule North Africa until the Eastern Romans (Byzantines) recaptured it in 534.
ME79994. Bronze nummus, cf. Wroth BMCV p. 27, 80 & pl. iii, 38, VF, crowded flan typical for the type, weight 1.460 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 180o, North African mint, c. 429 - 534 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Valentinian III right, blundered legend; reverse camp gate with two turrets, star between turrets, blundered legend; ex Forum (2016); rare; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

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REFERENCES|

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Grierson, P. & M. Mays. Catalogue of Late Roman Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection. (Washington D.C., 1992).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Romani-Byzantinii. (Vienna, 1989).
Kent, J. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Volume X, The Divided Empire and the Fall of the Western Parts, AD 395 - 491. (London, 1994).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Ranieri, E. La monetazione di Ravenna antica dal V all' VIII secolo: impero romano e bizantino, regno ostrogoto e langobardo. (Bologna, 2006).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire...Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 28, 2023.
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