Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Antiquities| ▸ |Antiquities by Material| ▸ |Metal Antiquities||View Options:  |  |  | 

Metal Antiquities
Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Lead| |Glandes| |Sling-Bullet,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|,
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 SALE |PRICE| $18.00


Caesarea Maritima, Judaea / Syria Palaestina, 1st - 3rd Century A.D., Lead Half Italian Litra Weight

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Caesarea| |Maritima,| |Judaea| |/| |Syria| |Palaestina,| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.,| |Lead| |Half| |Italian| |Litra| |Weight|,
A nearly identical specimen, from the same mold, was found near Caesarea Maritima in 1949 and is listed in the Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, Ameling, Cotton, Eck, et.al. on page 621. According to the authors, in Judaea, the term "litra" derived from the Roman word "libra" came to indicate local weight standards between the 1st and 2nd centuries CE. Therefore the word Iταλικη (Italica) was added whenever the Roman standard was intended. This weight is inscribed to indicate it is half an Italian litra. It is about 8 grams short of the standard but it probably originally had an handle attached that would have made it close to the appropriate weight. Around the end of the 3rd century CE, local standards were replaced entirely by the Roman system and the descriptive word Iταλικη was no longer necessary.
AS96251. Corpus Inscriptionum Iudaeae/Palaestinae, Vol. II, p. 621 (nearly identical specimen from the same mold), VF, roughly oval shape, probably missing handle at the top, weight 153.5 g, maximum diameter 87x43 mm, obverse ITA/ΛIK/H H/MI Λ/ITPA (half an Italian litra) in six lines; reverse blank; surface find, Caesarea Maritima, 1974; from The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection; very rare; $600.00 SALE |PRICE| $540.00


Roman, Bronze Repousse Plaque with Centaur Holding a Bow, Lorica Sqaumata Armor Plate(?), c. 1st - 3rd Century B.C.

|Roman| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Bronze| |Repousse| |Plaque| |with| |Centaur| |Holding| |a| |Bow,| |Lorica| |Sqaumata| |Armor| |Plate(?),| |c.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |B.C.|,
Likely used in some legionary application; perhaps as a lorica squamata legionary armor plate segment.
AA59779. Roman, bronze repousse, 1.75 x 1.75 inches, c. 1st - 3rd century A.D.; sheet bronze hammered from behind in repousse technique to raise the figure of a centaur holding a bow, remains of two rivet holes where it was attached, tear on body, rare and interesting; from a New Jersey collection; $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Roman Bronze Vessel Handle, Ornamented With Bacchus and a Panther, c. 1st Century A.D.

|Roman| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Bronze| |Vessel| |Handle,| |Ornamented| |With| |Bacchus| |and| |a| || |Panther,| |c.| |1st| |Century| |A.D.|,
The Panther was the companion of Bacchus. The grapevine and its wild barren alter-ego, the toxic ivy plant, were both sacred to him. This handle was once attached to vessel used for serving or drinking wine.
AI30971. height 8.0 cm (3"), excellent condition with a nice green patina, bronze vessel handle ornamented with a facing young head of Bacchus wearing an ivy wreath in his long flowing hair, panther skin tied at neck, the curving handle ends with a panther head; $350.00 SALE |PRICE| $315.00


Roman - Byzantine, Italy, Bronze Acorn Steelyard Pendant Weight, c. 1st to 7th century A.D.

|Weights| |&| |Scales|, |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Italy,| |Bronze| |Acorn| |Steelyard| |Pendant| |Weight,| |c.| |1st| |to| |7th| |century| |A.D.|, |weight|
Steelyards with acorn shaped counterweights were in use from the 1st century A.D. to the late Roman and Byzantine times. This weight is close to a very light Byzantine pound (285g) (cf. Ballance et al. 1989, 134). See Waclawik, M. "A bronze steelyard with an acorn-shaped counterweight from the Paphos Agora" in Studies in Art and Civilization 20 (Krakow, 2016) (PDF Available) for a similar but larger (405.5g) acorn weight and steelyard. The article notes that another similar scale and acorn weight was found at Pompeii.
LT96147. Bronze weight, Romano-Byzantine acorn steelyard pendant weight, 280.7g, 62mm tall, 33mm maximum diameter, part of loop missing otherwise complete and intact, light corrosion, light encrustation, $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Roman, Lead Conical Bulla Seal, Early 4th Century A.D.

|Seals|, |Roman,| |Lead| |Conical| |Bulla| |Seal,| |Early| |4th| |Century| |A.D.|, |seal|
The ancients did not all agree on the attributes of Serapis. A passage in Tacitus affirms that many recognized in this god, Aesculapius, imputing healing to his intervention; some thought him identical with Osiris, the oldest deity of the Egyptians; others regarded him as Jupiter, possessing universal power; but by most he was believed to be the same as Pluto, the "gloomy" Dis Pater of the infernal regions. The general impression of the ancients seems to have been that by Serapis, was to be understood the beginning and foundation of things. Julian II consulted the oracle of Apollo for the purpose of learning whether Pluto and Serapis were different gods; and he received for an answer that Jupiter-Serapis and Pluto were one and the same divinity.
AS83610. Lead seal, aEF, weight 8.022 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, early 4th Century A.D.; obverse diademed, draped, bearded, bust of Serapis right, kalathos(?) on head; reverse conical back, pierced for cord; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $125.00


Roman, Bronze Bird Fibula, C. End 2nd - 4th Century A.D.

|Fibulas| |&| |Clothing|, |Roman,| |Bronze| |Bird| |Fibula,| |C.| |End| |2nd| |-| |4th| |Century| |A.D.|,
This type is predominantly found in the Rhine area, in Noricum, and in Pannonia.
AS61829. Roman fibula; cf. Riha type 3.21, pl. 13, 316; Hattatt BOA 1158 (very similar to these two referenced specimens); 1.25 inches, pin missing, c. end 2nd - 4th century A.D.; crude type without decoration, detail or even much of a tail; from a New Jersey collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Roman, Large Iron Borer or File, 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Roman| |Antiquities|, |Roman,| |Large| |Iron| |Borer| |or| |File,| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|,
Another piece from the same group as this borer was dated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to 120 A.D. with a probable range of 80 A.D. - 160 A.D. Testing was done using an innovative technique which measures the carbon isotope ratio of the trace carbon in the iron. This carbon comes from the wood used in the production of the iron which must be of essentially the same age as the tool itself. Results were published in the journal, Radiocarbon, Summer 2001.
AE61804. Roman borer, cf. Petrie, 'Tools and Weapons', pl. LXV, 40; 7 inches, indent at one end for attaching handle, $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Roman, 2nd - early 3rd Century A.D., Bronze Wax-Seal Box

|Seals|, |Roman,| |2nd| |-| |early| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.,| |Bronze| |Wax-Seal| |Box|,
When the Romans sent important small packages by courier, such as documents or valuables, they were were placed in strong leather or cloth bags, which were sealed with a stout cord. The cord was threaded into and tied within a small metal box with a hinged lid. The box was filled with wax covering the knot and the wax was impressed with the sender's signet. In addition, the lid could be kept closed by further cords sewn to the package and tied around it.

See The Colchester Archaeological Trust online for a seal box nearly identical to ours found in a Roman pit at Lexden, a suburb of Colchester, Essex, England. A dupondius of Trajan minted in Rome, 114 - 117 A.D. was also found at the Lexden site. Another similar Roman seal box was found at the Balkerne Lane site in Colchester.
MA95786. See Hattatt ABOA, pp. 461 ff., Choice, complete and intact, sealed shut, rectangular bronze box with hinged cover, no indication of enamel, base perforated with three holes, hole in each side; 5.379g, 20.0mm x 15.7mm, 4.2mm (depth); $16.00 (14.72)







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Saturday, July 4, 2020.
Page created in 0.58 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity