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Ancient Pottery
Cypriot Bichrome Ware Amphora, Iron Age, c. 1100 - 750 B.C.

|Pottery| |Antiquities|, |Cypriot| |Bichrome| |Ware| |Amphora,| |Iron| |Age,| |c.| |1100| |-| |750| |B.C.|
The referenced amphora in the British Museum, dated Early Iron Age, 1100 - 750 B.C., is very similar to this amphora. The most significant difference is only the concentric circle motifs are on the neck, vice shoulder. The geometric patterns on this amphora are also found on earlier Mycenaean pottery.
AP23892. cf. Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, BR. MUS. II C., pl. 2, 1, choice, complete and intact, scattered mineral deposits, rim warped, 26cm (approx. 10 1/4 inches) tall, c. 1100/900 - 750/500 B.C.; fired terracotta, flat base, ovoid body, broad neck, everted mouth, a pair of stirrup handles, pale buff slip with decoration in dull brown, ladder pattern on flat rim, encircling bands of varying width on neck and body, 4 concentric circle motifs on shoulder, one wavy band encircling body, base and handles brown; ex prominent NY Collector DK; $2500.00 (2600.00)


Canaanite, Cypriot Imitative Lentoid Terracotta Pilgrim Flask, Late Bronze Age - Early Iron Age, c. 1400 - 1100 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Canaanite,| |Cypriot| |Imitative| |Lentoid| |Terracotta| |Pilgrim| |Flask,| |Late| |Bronze| |Age| |-| |Early| |Iron| |Age,| |c.| |1400| |-| |1100| |B.C.|
This flask came to us identified as a Cypriot flask found in Israel. This form is from Cyprus but most Cypriot specimens are "red lustrous ware." Click here to see a superb Cypriot flask in the British Museum. Our specimen is red-orange clay with a buff or brown slip and clearly cruder than the Cypriot examples. It is imitative of the Cypriot type, almost certainly made locally in Canaan. The referenced Canaanite flask is discussed in Trude Dothan's (1979), Excavations at the cemetery of Deir El-Balah (available online). Deir El-Balah is in the central Gaza Strip. The cemetery's main period of use spans the 13th century B.C., with a possible beginning in the 14th and extension into the 12th. The flask was found in grave 116, cut into the sandstone, and containing an anthropoid coffin and burial gifts that indicate, like other similar burials in the cemetery, the dead was of high position, had an Egyptian cultural affiliation, and must have lived in the area. Dothan notes several similar flasks from other Canaanite excavations, one dated c. 1250 - 1200, and others found in a mixed Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age context.
BK23894. cf. Deir El-Balah (Qedem 10) p. 40, 29; see note 9 for a list of other finds; for Cypriot prototype see BM Online 1899-1229-102, Choice, complete and intact, slip worn, terracotta lentoid pilgrim flask, 19 cm (7 1/2") tall, red-orange clay with a buff-brown slip, asymmetrical lentoid body wheel made in two joined halves, long neck, mouth just slightly flared, single handle from shoulder to neck; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); $1100.00 (1144.00)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93940. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; cf. Sussman Late 3126; Schloessinger 451; Bailey BMC -; 8.7 cm (3 3/8") long, Choice, complete and intact, tiny chips (from ancient use), earthen deposits, soot at nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink clay, buff slip, mold made with incised and/or punched decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim and incised groove surround a large fill hole, pair of grooves on handle, incised oblique lines radiating from fill hole (wreath?) on narrow convex shoulders, incised herringbone pattern on bottom of the nozzle; $120.00 (124.80)


Late Roman - Byzantine, Holyland (Syro-Palestinian), Bi-Lanceolate Pottery Oil Lamp, c. 270 - 500 A.D.

|Oil| |Lamps|, |Late| |Roman| |-| |Byzantine,| |Holyland| |(Syro-Palestinian),| |Bi-Lanceolate| |Pottery| |Oil| |Lamp,| |c.| |270| |-| |500| |A.D.|
Adler notes these lamps are found throughout the northern part of Israel, especially in Beit Shean and Hamat Gader, and date to the fourth and fifth centuries. Sussman lists more than a dozen very similar lamps, most found at Beit Shean, and she dates them to the late third and fourth centuries. At this time,, Beit Shean, was primarily Christian, but evidence of Jewish habitation and a Samaritan synagogue indicate established minority communities. Hamat Gader was already a well known health and recreation site in Roman times, mentioned in Strabo, Origen and Eunapius, as well as the Rabbinic literature. Construction of the bath complex began in the 2nd century by the 10th Roman Legion, which was garrisoned in nearby Gadara (modern Umm Qais). The ancient Hebrew name means hot springs of (the ancient city of) Gadara. The Arabic name El-Hamma preserves this, and the name of the tel located near the site, Tel Bani, is a corruption of the Latin word meaning "baths." The empress Aelia Eudocia composed a poem praising the qualities of the multiple springs which was inscribed so that visitors could see it as they went into the pool. The photo to the right is of the ancient Roman baths. Click the photo to see a larger image.Hammat Gader Baths
AL93918. Bi-lanceolate pottery oil lamp; Adler Collection (website) type N2; Sussman Late 3125- 3136; 8.0 cm (3 1/8") long, near Choice, complete and intact, encrustation, wear, soot on nozzle, c. 270 - 500 A.D.; pink-buff clay, mold made with incised decoration, the body includes the entire lamp from tip of nozzle to tip of "tongue" handle, wide rim surrounds a large fill hole, incised herring-bone geometric wreath pattern on narrow convex shoulders, two incised lengthwise lines on the handle, incised lines between fill hold rim and nozzle; $80.00 (83.20)


Kingdom of Israel, Pottery Bowl, Iron Age I, 1200 - 800 B.C.

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Kingdom| |of| |Israel,| |Pottery| |Bowl,| |Iron| |Age| |I,| |1200| |-| |800| |B.C.|
Time of Samuel and Judges.

From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

Found in Israel.
AH48135. Pottery bowl; cf. Amiran pl. 60, 1; buff, wheel-made, ovoid body, vertical side rim, pedestal ring base, 2 inches high x 6 inches diameter, Superb, intact, SOLD


Columbia, Guacari Region, Narino, Red Glazed Zoomorphic (Frog) Pot, c. 1000 A.D.

|Pre-Columbian| |Antiquities|, |Columbia,| |Guacari| |Region,| |Narino,| |Red| |Glazed| |Zoomorphic| |(Frog)| |Pot,| |c.| |1000| |A.D.|
 
AE61811. Narino, Zoomorphic Pot, 2.5 inches, burnished red glazed vessel with rim decorated with a molded frog, intact, SOLD







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