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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Greek Imperial| ▸ |Thrace||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins from Thrace
Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP96856. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.14.19 (R2), Varbanov I 2359 (R3), AMNG I/I 1387, Moushmov 1013 var. (Herakles' head right), SNG Cop 267 var., BMC Thrace -, VF, nice green patina, light marks, encrustations, ragged edge, weight 3.890 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠO−ΛIT ΠPOC IC, Herakles standing slightly left, head left, nude, leaning on grounded club in right hand, skin of the Nemean lion draped over left arm; $80.00 (€65.60)
 


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||AE| |26|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP96501. Bronze AE 26, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.17.15.1 (R6), AMNG I/I 1455, Varbanov I 2900 (R7), Moushmov 1029, SNG Cop -, aF, etched surfaces, edge crack, central depressions, weight 9.936 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, consular legate Aurelius Gallus, 201 - 203 A.D.; obverse IYΛIA ∆OMNA CEBA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, large chignon at back of head; reverse YΠ AYP ΓAΛΛOY - NIKOΠOΛITΩNOC, ΠPOC IC (ending in exergue), Aphrodite Pudica, nude, standing facing, covering her private parts with her hands, Eros stands at her left, wreath in right hand, torch downward in right hand; rare; $70.00 (€57.40)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
The figure on the reverse is most often identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP97238. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.16.16 (R3), Moushmov 926, AMNG I/I 1367 (R3) var. (leg.), Varbanov I 2481 (R3) var. (obv. leg., bust), BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, F, rough, edge ragged, part of reverse legend not struck, weight 3.040 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 30o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV KAI CEVHP, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPOC I, winged Thanatos standing right, legs crossed legs, leaning on reversed torch on right set on low base; scarce; $60.00 (€49.20)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C.

|Alexander| |the| |Great|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.||stater|
In 279 B.C., Ptolemy Keraunos, the son of Ptolemy I, was captured and killed by Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. Mesembria, Odessos, Kallatis, and Istros, later followed by Cabyle, Dionysopolis and Tomis began striking gold and silver coins in the name of Alexander the Great along with autonomous civic bronze coinage. Much of the silver and gold coinage was likely needed to pay tribute to the new Celtic rulers of the hinterland until the destruction of the Kingdom of Tylis, c. 218 B.C.
SH32292. Gold stater, Price 898 var. (monogram; cf. Price 927 tetradrachm), EF, high relief, bold, mint luster and a rare variety, small scratch on reverse, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kallatis (Mangalia, Romania) mint, c. 250 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake; reverse Nike standing half left, wreath in extended right hand, stylus in left, KAΛ monogram to left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; SOLD


Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great

|Kingdom| |of| |Thrace|, |Kingdom| |of| |Thrace,| |Lysimachos,| |305| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Portrait| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||stater|
Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's personal bodyguards, was appointed strategos (general) in Thrace and Chersonesos after Alexander's death. He became one of the diadochi (successors of Alexander) who were initially generals and governors, but who continuously allied and warred with each other and eventually divided the empire. In 309, he founded his capital Lysimachia in a commanding situation on the neck connecting the Chersonesos with the mainland. In 306, he followed the example of Antigonus in taking the title of king, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281, he was killed in battle against Seleucus, another successor of Alexander.
SH09059. Gold stater, Thompson 164, EF, struck with beautiful dies, mint luster!, weight 8.50 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, posthumous, 305 - 297 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great right wearing the horn of Ammon; reverse Athena Nikephoros enthroned left, Nike crowning name in extended right hand, left arm rests on grounded round shield decorated with Gorgoneion, transverse spear against right side, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΛYΣIMAXOY (Lysimachos) downward on left, bee and E-Φ in left field; SOLD


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Anchialos, Thrace

|Anchialus|, |Gordian| |III,| |29| |July| |238| |-| |25| |February| |244| |A.D.,| |Anchialos,| |Thrace||AE| |26|
Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria today) was possibly founded in the 5th or 4th century B.C. as a colony of Apollonia. It is mentioned in Strabo's Geographica as a small town. It was briefly captured by Messembria in the 2nd century B.C., but retaken by Apollonia and its fortified walls destroyed. The western Black Sea coast was conquered by the Romans under Marcus Licinius Crassus in 29 - 28 B.C. after continuous campaigns in the area since 72 - 71. The city became part of the Roman province of Thrace and was formally proclaimed a city under Trajan. Anchialos prospered as the most important import and export location in Thrace during the 2nd and 3rd centuries and acquired the appearance of a Roman city during the Severan Dynasty.
SH57019. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov 728, AMNG II 680, cf. Moushmov 2965, Price-Trell -, SNG Cop -, BMC Thrace -, VF, weight 12.117 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Anchialos (Pomorie, Bulgaria) mint, May 241 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AYT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AYΓ TPANKYΛ/ΛINA, confronted busts of Gordian on left, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Tranquillina on right, draped and wearing stephane; reverse OYΛΠIANΩN AΓXI/AΛEΩN, tetrastyle temple containing statue of Apollo standing facing, right arm raised over head, holding lyre in left and resting elbow on tripod, pellet in pediment; ex Stack's Coin Galleries auction April 2010, lot 218, ex Cornelius C. Vermeule collection; very rare; SOLD


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

|Hadrianopolis|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| || |217| |A.D.,| |Hadrianopolis,| |Thrace||AE| |20|
The figure on the reverse is sometimes identified as Eros (Cupid) or a generic winged Genius. The inverted torch represents a life extinguished, indicating the figure is Thanatos (death). By the Severan Era, there was increased hope for an afterlife in pleasant Elysium rather than in dismal Hades. Thanatos was associated more with a gentle passing than a woeful demise. Thanatos as a winged boy, very much akin to Cupid, with crossed legs and an inverted torch, became the most common symbol for death, depicted on many Roman sarcophagi.
RP89895. Bronze AE 20, Jurukova Hadrianopolis 390 (V199/R379), Varbanov II 3526 (R4), SNG Cop 571, BMC Thrace -, VF, brown tone, attractive style, slightly ragged flan with small edge splits, weight 3.986 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 30o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M AVP C EV - ANTΩNEINOC, laureate head right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Thanatos standing right, winged, legs crossed, leaning on inverted extinguished torch; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
Imhoof-Blumer, F. ed. Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands. (Berlin, 1898 - 1913).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T. Description de Médailles antiques grecques et romaines. (Paris, 1806-1837).
Mouchmov, N. Antichnitie Moneti na Balkanskitiia Poluostrov i Monetite Tsare. (1912).
Poole, R. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 2: Taurische Chersones-Korkyra. (Berlin, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VII, Manchester University Museum. (London, 1986).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, United States, The Collection of the ANS, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2007).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 18, 2022.
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