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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.

Judaean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa II, c. 49 - 95 A.D., for Domitian

|Agrippa| |I|, |Judaean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |Agrippa| |II,| |c.| |49| |-| |95| |A.D.,| |for| |Domitian||full| |unit|
We use the dating provided by RPC Online, which adopts 60/61 A.D. for year 1 of the era used by Agrippa II. This solves a number of issues with previous dating schemes, but adds the oddity of a large number of issues of posthumous coinage for Vespasian and Titus. This coin struck for Titus, for example; dated year 30 using this era is 89/90 A.D. Titus died in 81 B.C.
JD98847. Bronze full unit, Hendin 6328 (RR); RPC Online II 2296; BMC Palestine p. 243, 56; SNG ANS 315; Meshorer TJC 179; Sofaer p. 268 & pl. 218, 260, gF, rough, corrosion, scrapes, uneven strike, edge cracks, weight 12.238 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Paneas (Banias, Golan Heights) mint, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA ∆OMITIA KAICAP A ΓEPMANI (Emperor Domitian Caesar Germanicus), laureate head of Titus right; reverse Tyche-Demeter standing slightly left, head left, stalks of barley in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, ETOY - EΛ BA / AΓPI-ΠΠA (year 35, King Agrippa) in two lines divided across the field below center; from an Israeli collection; rare; $270.00 (245.70)


Parthian Empire, Phraates IV, c. 38 - 2 B.C.

|Parthian| |Empire|, |Parthian| |Empire,| |Phraates| |IV,| |c.| |38| |-| |2| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Soon after Phraates IV was designated the successor to the throne, he murdered his father and all of his thirty brothers. In 36 B.C. he was defeated by Mark Antony and lost most of his army, however, Antony had to abandon his conquests to fight Octavian. Tiridates temporarily usurped the throne in 32 B.C., but Phraates soon defeated him. In 20 B.C., Phraates made peace with Rome. He returned the prisoners and eagles taken from Crassus and Armenia was recognized as a Roman dependency. Augustus gave Phraates an Italian concubine, Musa, whom he made his favored wife. She persuaded him to designate their son Phraataces as his successor and to send his other sons to Rome as hostages. With all rivals out of the way, Musa and Phraataces poisoned the king and took the throne as co-rulers.
GS96025. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Sellwood 51, Cohen DCA 611, Shore 272, Sunrise 388, SNG Cop - (various dates), aVF, toned, porous, scratches, weight 10.931 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 26 - 23 B.C.; obverse diademed bust left, wearing ornate robes, wart on forehead, long beard with flat end, hair in four formal rows, spiral neck torque ends in a horse forepart; reverse BACIΛEΩC / BACIΛEΩN − ΛPΣAKOY / EYEIΓETOY − ∆IKAIOY − EΠIΦΛNOYΣ / ΦIΛEΛΛHNOΣ in seven line square around, king enthroned right, wearing tunic and trousers, Tyche standing left before him, wearing kalathos, chiton and peplos, offering palm frond with right hand, cornucopia in left hand, tiny Seleukid Era year (ZΠC?) under seat of throne, uncertain Parthian month in exergue (mostly off flan); from the Errett Bishop Collection; $140.00 (127.40)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

|Troas|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Alexandreia| |Troas,| |Troas||AE| |22|
Alexandria Troas (modern Eski Stambul) is on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of the west coast of Anatolia, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). The city was founded by Antigonus around 310 B.C. with the name Antigoneia and was populated with the inhabitants of Cebren, Colone, Hamaxitus, Neandria, and Scepsis. About 301 B.C., Lysimachus improved the city and re-named it Alexandreia. Among the few structure ruins remaining today are a bath, an odeon, a theater and gymnasium complex and a stadium. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.
RP97537. Bronze AE 22, Bellinger Troy A431, RPC Online -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA-, SNG Canakkale -, BMC Troas -, gVF, bold portrait, dark brown patina with touches of green and red, flow lines, edge splits, weight 4.428 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse IMP LICIN VALERIAN, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL A-V-G-O TRO, Tyche standing facing, head left, wearing turreted crown, cult statue of Apollo Smintheus (quiver on shoulder, holding bow (and patera?)) in her right hand, vexillum in her left hand; ex CNG e-auction 442 (17 April 2019), lot 669; ex N. M. McQ. Holmes Collection; ex CNG auction 46 (24 Jun 1998), lot 831; very rare; $140.00 (127.40)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Edessa Macedonia

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Edessa| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Edessa, in the central Macedonia region of Greece, was known as the "City of Waters". The city achieved certain prominence in the first centuries AD, being located on the Via Egnatia, a road constructed by the Romans in the 2nd century BC. It crossed Illyricum, Macedonia, and Thracia, running through territory that is now part of modern Albania, North Macedonia, Greece, and European Turkey as a continuation of the Via Appia. From 27 BC to 268 AD it had its own mint.
RP96945. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov I 3631, Moushmov 6269, RPC Online -, SNG Cop -, BMC -, Choice F, nice dark green patina, well centered, some porosity, central cavity on obverse, weight 10.379 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Edessa Macedonia mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse E∆ECCAIΩN, Roma seated left on a cuirass, wearing Corinthian helmet, Nike in right hand, stage at her feet, City goddess standing left behind her, crowning her with wreath in right hand, scepter in left hand; $135.00 (122.85)


Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 5 - 4 B.C., Legate P. Quinctilius Varus

|Antioch|, |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |5| |-| |4| |B.C.,| |Legate| |P.| |Quinctilius| |Varus||trichalkon|
Publius Quinctilius Varus was a Roman general and politician under Augustus. From 7 or 6 B.C. until 4 B.C. he governed Syria where he was known for harsh rule and high taxes. Josephus mentions the swift action of Varus in 4 B.C., against a revolt in Judaea following the death of Herod the Great. Varus occupied Jerusalem and crucified 2000 rebels. Varus is most infamous for losing three Roman legions in an ambush by Germanic tribes led by Arminius in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest, at which point he took his own life. Upon hearing the news, Augustus tore his clothes, refused to cut his hair for months and, for years afterward, was heard, upon occasion, to moan, "Quinctilius Varus, give me back my Legions!" (Quintili Vare, legiones redde!).
RY99148. Bronze trichalkon, McAlee 87; Butcher 50c; RPC I 4252; SNG Cop 92; SNG Munchen 640; BMC Galatia p. 159, 59; Cohen DCA 402 (S), gF, black patina, well centered, edge split, light earthen deposits, weight 6.816 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, legate P. Quinctilius Varus, 5 - 4 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ANTIOXEΩ EΠI OVAPOV, Tyche of Antioch seated right on rocks, turreted, wearing chiton and peplos, palm frond in her right hand, half-length figure of river-god Orontes swimming right below, his head turned facing, ZK (Actian Era year 27) in the right field; scarce; $120.00 (109.20)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94893. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman pl. 51, 43a (same dies), cf. Sofaer 45 (normal style, legends), BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, Rosenberger IV -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, barbaric style and epigraphy, weak incomplete legends, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse ANTEINO M AVP - AVTOKRATO (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, barbaric style; reverse MHTPOΠO A∆P ΠETPO (or similar), Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, extending right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, barbaric style; from the Ray Nouri Collection; very rare; $115.00 (104.65)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |22|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP93151. Bronze AE 22, Krzyzanowska XVII/-; SNG BnF 1127 var. (same obv. die, rev. leg. var.); SNG PfPs 47 var. (same); BMC Lycia p. 181, 34 var. (rev. leg.), VF, dark green patina, minor earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 6.118 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, chignon at back of head; reverse ANTIOCH GEN CL CA, Tyche (Genius of the colony) standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, wearing long chiton and peplos, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $100.00 (91.00)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $100.00 (91.00)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Pautalia, Thrace

|Pautalia|, |Faustina| |Junior,| |Augusta| |146| |-| |Winter| |175/176| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |Pautalia,| |Thrace||AE| |21|
In 174, Faustina the Younger accompanied her husband, Marcus Aurelius, on various military campaigns. She was loved by the Roman soldiers and Aurelius gave her the title Mater Castrorum (Mother of the Camp).
RP97818. Bronze AE 21, Ruzicka Pautalia 138, RPC Online IV.1 T8330, Varbanov II 4490 (R3), BMC Thrace p. 142, 12; Moushmov 4114, VF, attractive style, nice green patina, slightly off center, weight 7.178 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, Pautalia (Kyustendil, Bulgaria) mint, 161 - 176 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTEINA - CEBACTH, diademed draped bust right, hair in a coil at the back; reverse OVΛΠIAC ΠAVTAΛIAC, Tyche-Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder held by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $100.00 (91.00)


Eusebeia (Caesarea), Cappadocian Kingdom, Reign of Archelaus, c. 36 B.C. - 17 A.D.

|Cappadocia|, |Eusebeia| |(Caesarea),| |Cappadocian| |Kingdom,| |Reign| |of| |Archelaus,| |c.| |36| |B.C.| |-| |17| |A.D.||AE| |15|
Kayseri, originally called Mazaka or Mazaca, is in central Turkey on a low spur on the north side of Mount Erciyes (Mount Argaeus in ancient times). In Strabo's time the city had been renamed Eusebeia to honor the Cappadocian King Ariathes V Eusebes, who ruled 163 - 130 B.C. The name was changed again to "Caesarea in Cappadocia" in honor of Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. After the Muslim conquest, Arabic influence changed Caesarea to the modern name Kayseri.
GB98214. Bronze AE 15, Ganschow, type 5c, 53; SNGvA 6336; SNG Tbingen 4615; cf. Sydenham Caesarea 19 ff. (controls); SNG Cop 168 (same); BMC Galatia p. 46, 9 (same), aVF, green patina, porosity/light corrosion, tiny edge splits, weight 2.376 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, c. 36 B.C. - 14 A.D.; obverse head of Tyche right, wearing turreted helmet/crown with crest; reverse palm frond upright, EVΣE-BEIAΣ in two downward lines the first on the right, T (control) outer left, ∆ (control) outer right; rare; $90.00 (81.90)




  



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