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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.

Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D., Tyana, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Marcus| |Aurelius,| |7| |March| |161| |-| |17| |March| |180| |A.D.,| |Tyana,| |Cappadocia||AE| |24|NEW
Tyana was an ancient city in the Anatolian region of Cappadocia. Under Caracalla the city became Antoniana colonia Tyana. After having sided with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra it was captured by Aurelian in 272, who would not allow his soldiers to sack it, allegedly because Apollo appeared to him, pleading for its safety. The ruins of Tyana are at modern Kemerhisar, three miles south of Nigde. There are remains of a Roman aqueduct and of cave cemeteries and sepulchral grottoes.
RP98020. Bronze AE 24, Ganschow II p. 407, 1024; RPC IV.3 T5742; BMC Galatia p. 97, 7; Lindgren-Kovacs 1739; Waddington p. 406, 6808; SNG Cop -, VF, dark brown patina, weight 8.747 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, Cappadocia, Tyana (Kemerhisar, Turkey) mint, 164 - 165 A.D.; obverse AYTOK M - ANTWNEINOC - CE, laureate, bearded head right; reverse TYANEWN - T Π T IEP ACY AYTO (TΩN ΠPOC TAYPO IEPAC ACYΛOY AYTONOMO = of Tyana at the Taurus, Holy Sanctuary, Autonomous), Tyche seated left, turreted, stalks of grain and bunch of grapes in right hand, resting left hand on seat, left foot on swimming river-god (Euphrates), seat decorated with griffin, ET - B (year 2) divided across field; $150.00 (€123.00)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Rabbathmoba-Areopolis, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Rabbathmoba-Areopolis,| |Arabia||AE| |29|
Rabbathmoba (also called Areopolis or Aresopolis), on the Karak plateau, was probably the Biblical Ir-Moab conquered by Alexander Jannaeus. Its ruins are 18 kilometers north of Kerak in Jordan. Rabbath-Moba minted coins during the reigns of the Severan emperors between 193 and 222 A.D.
RY94932. Bronze AE 29, apparently unpublished; Sofaer 7 - 8 var. (obv. legend), SNG ANS 1413 var. (same); Spijkerman p. 265, 14 - 16 var. (same); Rosenberger IV -, F, green patina with highlighting orange earthen deposits, scratches, tight squared flan, weight 13.613 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rabbathmoba (near Kerak, Jordan) mint, 209 - 210 A.D.; obverse AYT K Λ CEΠ CEOVHPOC CEBACTO, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse PABAΘMOUBHNWN TUCH, Tyche standing right, wearing mural crown, her right foot on a river god, long scepter vertical in right hand, small bust in left hand, P-∆ ([year] 104 [of Roman rule]) divided across field; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $135.00 (€110.70)
 


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Edessa Macedonia

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Edessa| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Edessa, in the central Macedonia region of Greece, was known as the "City of Waters". The city achieved certain prominence in the first centuries AD, being located on the Via Egnatia, a road constructed by the Romans in the 2nd century BC. It crossed Illyricum, Macedonia, and Thracia, running through territory that is now part of modern Albania, North Macedonia, Greece, and European Turkey as a continuation of the Via Appia. From 27 BC to 268 AD it had its own mint.
RP96945. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov I 3631, Moushmov 6269, RPC Online -, SNG Cop -, BMC -, Choice F, nice dark green patina, well centered, some porosity, central cavity on obverse, weight 10.379 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Edessa Macedonia mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AV K M AVP ANTΩNINOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse E∆ECCAIΩN, Roma seated left on a cuirass, wearing Corinthian helmet, Nike in right hand, stage at her feet, City goddess standing left behind her, crowning her with wreath in right hand, scepter in left hand; $135.00 (€110.70)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94893. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman pl. 51, 43a (same dies), cf. Sofaer 45 (normal style, legends), BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, Rosenberger IV -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, barbaric style and epigraphy, weak incomplete legends, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse ANTEINO M AVP - AVTOKRATO (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, barbaric style; reverse MHTPOΠO A∆P ΠETPO (or similar), Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, extending right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, barbaric style; from the Ray Nouri Collection; very rare; $130.00 (€106.60)
 


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Augusta| |194| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |22|
Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. Increasingly during the Hellenistic period, cities had their own specific iconic version of Tyche, wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city).
RP93151. Bronze AE 22, Krzyzanowska XVII/-; SNG BnF 1127 var. (same obv. die, rev. leg. var.); SNG PfPs 47 var. (same); BMC Lycia p. 181, 34 var. (rev. leg.), VF, dark green patina, minor earthen deposits, small edge splits, weight 6.118 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse ANTIOCH GEN CL CA, Tyche (Genius of the colony) standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, wearing long chiton and peplos, branch in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $115.00 (€94.30)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $115.00 (€94.30)
 


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Nisibis, Mesopotamia

|Mesopotamia| |&| |Babylonia|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Nisibis,| |Mesopotamia||AE| |25|
Nisibis is the city of Netzivin in the Talmud. The Jews of Nisibis resisted the Roman conqueror, Trajan, to maintain Parthian rule. The city was taken only after a lengthy siege. After the it fell, Nisibis was laid waste and the massacre was so great that the houses, streets, and roads were strewn with corpses.
RY93159. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online VIII U2787; SNG Cop 242; SNG Hunterian 2446; BMC Arabia p. 122, 17; Lindgren-Kovacs 2603; McClean 9557, aVF, full legends, light earthen deposits, cleaning scratches, tiny flan flaw above head on obv., weight 8.360 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Nisibis (Nusaybin, Turkey) mint, A.D. 247 - 249; obverse AYTOK K M IOUΛI ΦIΛIΠΠOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse IOY CEΠ KOΛΩ NECIBI MHT, tetrastyle temple with twisted columns; within arched central bay: statue of Tyche seated facing, ram (sign of Ares) leaping right with head turned back left above, river-god swimming right below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 (€90.20)
 


Macrinus, 11 April 217 - 8 June 218 A.D., Gabala, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Macrinus,| |11| |April| |217| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Gabala,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |24|
Gabula was important enough in the Roman province of Syria Prima to be a Metropolitan Archdiocese in the sway of the Patriarchate of Antioch (the provincial capital Antioch on the Orontes), but was to fade, presumably at the advent of Islam.
RY92570. Bronze AE 24, SNG Cop 316; SNG Hunterian II 3244; Lindgren III 1192; SNG Munchen 835; BMC Galatia p. 246, 20 var. (laureate head), VF, dark green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off much of legends, porous, weight 8.847 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 15o, Gabala (Jableh, Syria) mint, 11 Apr 217 - 8 Jun 218 A.D.; obverse AV K M O C MAKPEINOC CE, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΓABAΛEWN, Tyche seated left, wearing chiton, peplos and modius, rudder held by tiller on right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $90.00 (€73.80)
 


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|
Excavations have demonstrated that it was the ability of the Nabataeans to control the water supply that led to the rise of the desert city, creating an artificial oasis. The area was subject to flash floods, but archaeological evidence shows that the Nabataeans controlled these floods by the use of dams, cisterns and water conduits. These innovations stored this flood water for prolonged periods of drought and enabled the city to prosper in the desert.The Decapolis
RY94940. Bronze AE 23, cf. SNG ANS 1369, Sofaer 14, Spijkerman 34, Rosenberger IV 21, BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, Lindgren -, F, dark green patina with earthen deposit highlighting, scratches, weight 6.896 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ CEΠT CEOVHPOC (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHTP (or similar), Tyche seated left on rocks inside distyle temple, stele extended in right hand, trophy over shoulder in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; $90.00 (€73.80)
 


Julia Domna, Wife of Septimius Severus. Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D., Tabae, Caria

|Other| |Caria|, |Julia| |Domna,| |Wife| |of| |Septimius| |Severus.| |Augusta| |254| |-| |c.| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Tabae,| |Caria||AE| |25|
Tabae (or Tabai) was a city in ancient Caria, although, according to Strabo it was located in a plain in Phrygia on the boundaries of Caria. Stephanus Byzantius mentions two cities of this name, one in Lydia (which is conjectured to be Tabala), the other in Caria. Livy says that it was on the frontier of Pisidia towards the coast of the Gulf of Pamphylia. The location at Tavas, near Kale, Denizli in Turkey has been confirmed by inscriptions and ancient remains.
RP97239. Bronze AE 25, SNGvA 2723; SNG Cop 564; SNG München XXII 459; BMC Caria, p. 171, 84, aVF, nice green patina, weight 8.444 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Tabae (Tavas, Denizli, Turkey) mint, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D; obverse IOV ∆OMNA CEB, draped bust right; reverse TABHNΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; scarce; $90.00 (€73.80)
 




  



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