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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins| ▸ |Byzantine Gold||View Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Gold Coins

Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to the former Byzantium in Thrace and renamed it Constantinopolis, present day Istanbul, Turkey. Numismatists, for convenience, have arbitrarily categorized coins from Anastasius I and after as Byzantine coins. Numismatists use Anastasius as the beginning of Byzantine because he dramatically reformed the bronze coinage. A significant minority of numismatists pick an earlier time and ruler, often Constantine the Great, as the dividing time between the Roman and Byzantine empires, because most coins were issued from Constantinople, or since it became the seat of government. Although the citizens generally spoke Greek, they considered themselves Roman for the entire Byzantine period, making our division of the empire an entirely modern convention.

Romanus III Argyrus, 12 November 1028 - 11 April 1034

|Romanus| |III|, |Romanus| |III| |Argyrus,| |12| |November| |1028| |-| |11| |April| |1034|, |histamenon| |nomisma|
Romanus III was fanatically devoted to the Virgin. His adoration found expression in the building and restoration of churches dedicated to St. Mary and also explains the Virgin's prominence on his coinage. MΘ is a Greek abbreviation for Mητερα Tου Θεου - Mother of God. ΘCE abbreviates Θεοτοκε - God-bearer, also referring to the Virgin. On one of his types, a silver miliaresion, the inscription reads: Παρθενε σοι πολυαινε ος ηλιτικη παντα κατοπθοι, which means, "He who places his hopes on thee, O Virgin all-glorious, will prosper in all he does."
RS94631. Gold histamenon nomisma, DOC III part 2, 1d, Morrisson BnF 43/Cp/AV/01, Ratto 1972, Sommer 43.2.2, SBCV 1819, Wroth BMC 2, Choice VF, well centered, highest points flat (not fully struck), weight 4.311 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 12 Nov 1028 - 11 Apr 1034; obverse + IhS XIS REX REςNANTIhm (Jesus Christ King of Kings), Christ enthroned, wears nimbus cruciger, pallium, & colobium, raises hand, holds Gospels; reverse ΘCE bOHΘ RWMANW (god-bearer help the Romans), MΘ (mother of God) above center, nimbate Virgin (on right) wears pallium and maphorium, with right hand she crowns Romanus, who is bearded and wears a crown, sakkos and loros, globus cruciger in his right, four pellets in loros end below globus; from the Ray Nouri Collection; scarce; $1100.00 SALE |PRICE| $990.00
 


Byzantine Empire, Constantine VIII, 15 December 1025 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

|Constantine| |VIII|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constantine| |VIII,| |15| |December| |1025| |-| |11| |November| |1028| |A.D.|, |histamenon| |nomisma|
SH21620. Gold histamenon nomisma, SBCV 1815; DOC III part 2, 2, Choice EF, weight 4.391 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, obverse + IhS XPS REX REGNANTINM, Christ Pantocrator with gospels; reverse + CWNSTANTIN BASILEWS ROM, bust facing, wearing crown and loros, labarum in right, akakia in left; very scarce; SOLD


Byzantine Empire, Constans II and Constantine IV, 13 April 654 - 15 July 668 A.D.

|Byzantine| |Gold|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Constans| |II| |and| |Constantine| |IV,| |13| |April| |654| |-| |15| |July| |668| |A.D.|, |solidus|
On 8 May 663, the Byzantine army led by Constans II was defeated at the Battle of Forino by the Lombards under Romuald I. Romuald I seized Taranto and Brindisi. The Bulgar Alcek horde, Lombard allies in the battle, settled in the area of Ravenna. Human graves of a steppe-nomadic character as well as horse burials datable to the second half of the eighth century attest to the continued presence of the Bulgars in the Molise and Campania. In the lifetime of Paul the Deacon, he recorded that the descendants of these Bulgars still spoke their language, as well as Latin.
SH70071. Gold solidus, DOC II part 2, 30h; Morrisson BnF 62; Tolstoi 305; Ratto 1608; Hahn MIB 31; Sommer 12.23; SBCV 964; Wroth BMC -, EF, tight flan, weight 4.328 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, 9th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 661 - 663 A.D.; obverse D N COI-N (blundered fragmentary legend), facing busts of Constans & Constantine IV, Constans wears plumed helmet, Constantine a helmet with cross, small cross between heads; reverse VICTORIA AVGY Θ (victory of the Emperor, 9th officina), cross potent on three steps between Heraclius (left) and Tiberius standing facing, each wears crown and chlamys and holds globus cruciger in right, CONOB in exergue; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

Adelson, Howard. Light Weight Solidi and Byzantine Trade during the Sixth and Seventh Centuries. ANSNNM 138. (New York, 1957).
Anastasi, Marco. Monete Bizantine di Sicilia. (NP, 2009).
Bellinger, A. & P. Grierson, eds. Catalogue of the Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and in the Whittemore Collection. (Washington D.C., 1966 - 1999).
Bendall, S. A Private Collection of Palaeologan Coins. (Wolverhampton, 1988).
Berk, H. Roman Gold Coins of the Medieval World, 383 - 1453 A.D. (Joliet, IL, 1986).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d?or de Constantin II à Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Füeg, F. Corpus of the Nomismata from Anastasius II to John I in Constantinople, 713 - 976. (2007).
Füeg, F. "Vom Umgang mit Zufall und Wahrscheinlichkeit in der Numismatischen Forschung" in SNR 76 (1997).
Grierson, P. Byzantine Coins. (London, 1999).
Grierson, P. "Byzantine Gold Bullae, with a Catalogue of those at Dumbarton Oaks" in Dumbarton Oaks Papers 20 (1966).
Hahn, W. Moneta Imperii Byzantini. (Vienna, 1973-81).
Hahn, W. & W. Metcalf. Studies in Early Byzantine Gold Coinage. ANSNS 17 (1988).
Hendy, M. Coinage and Money in the Byzantine Empire 1081-1261. (Washington D.C., 1969).
Hennequin, G. Catalogue des monnaies musulmanes de la Bibliotheque Nationale. (Paris, 1985).
Lianta, E. Late Byzantine Coins, 1204 - 1453, in the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. (London, 2009).
Morrisson, C. Catalogue des Monnaies Byzantines de la Bibliothèque Nationale. (Paris, 1970).
Morrisson, C. "Le trésor byzantine de Nikertai" in RBN 118 (1972), pp. 29 - 91.
Sear, D. Byzantine Coins and Their Values. (London, 1987).
Sommer, A. Die Münzen des Byzantinischen Reiches 491-1453. Mit einem Anhang: Die Münzen des Kaiserreichs von Trapezunt. (Regenstauf, 2010).
Ratto, R. Monnaies Byzantines et d'autre Pays contemporaines à l'époque byzantine. (Lugano, 1930).
Tolstoi, I. Monnaies byzantines. (St. Petersburg, 1913 - 14).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Imperial Byzantine Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1908).
Wroth, W. Catalogue of the Coins of the Vandals, Ostrogoths, Lombards and of the Empires of Thessalonica, Nicaea, and Trebizond in the British Museum. (London, 1911).

Catalog current as of Sunday, September 20, 2020.
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