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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros||View Options:  |  |  |   


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 134 A.D.

|Pergamon|, |Pergamon,| |Mysia,| |c.| |134| |A.D.||dupondius|
Eurypylos was a Mysian hero of the Trojan War. His image is otherwise unknown on coinage. Like Bellerophon at Corinth and Dionysos at Tium, this image of a local hero appears modeled on Antinous. Homer (Odyssey 11.522) has Odysseus say that Eurypylus was, next to Memnon, the most beautiful man he had ever seen.

The strategos I. Pollion is named on several coin types of Pergamon during the reign of Hadrian, including one for Sabina (RPC III 1737) and another for Antinous (RPC III, 1738).

The link between Pergamon and Paphos, evidenced by this coin, is not well understood. However, the same reverse was used, from Hadrian to Philip I, on coins struck to honor an alliance between Sardes and Paphos.
RP96071. Orichalcum dupondius, RPC Online III 1740 (4 spec.), SNG BnF 1897, Weber 5206, SNG Cop -, BMC Mysia -, F, porous, reverse off center, countermark obscure, weight 11.652 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, time of Hadrian, c. 134 A.D.; obverse HPΩC EYPYΠYΛOC (Hero Eurypylos), head of hero Eurypylos (with the features of Antinous) right, flowing hair, uncertain oval countermark; reverse ΠEPΓAMHNΩN EΠI CTP ΠΩΛΛIΩNOC (Pergamon, struck under strategos Pollion), temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon, semicircular walled courtyard, ΠAΦIA (of Paphos) across the courtyard; extremely rare, the 5th known; $970.00 (€892.40)


Metapontion, Lucania, Italy, c. 340 - 330 B.C.

|Italy|, |Metapontion,| |Lucania,| |Italy,| |c.| |340| |-| |330| |B.C.||stater|
Leukippos (or Leucippus) was a son of king Oinomaos of Pisa. He fell in love with the nymph Daphne and disguised himself as a girl to join her company. When she discovered his true identity in the bath, he was slain by the nymphs. Based on this portrait, clearly his plan was doomed from the start.

Another Leukippos, unrelated to the coin, was a philosopher in the first half of 5th century B.C. This Leukippos was the first Greek to develop the theory of atomism; the idea that everything is composed entirely of various imperishable, indivisible elements called atoms. His theory was elaborated in far greater detail by his pupil and successor, Democritus. Leukippos was born in Miletus or Abdera.
GI95918. Silver stater, Johnston Class B, 2; SNG Cop 1208; SNG ANS 432 ff.; HN Italy 1575; HGC Italy -, F, centered on a tight flan, toned, bumps and scratches, inscription poorly struck, weight 7.525 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, Metapontion (Metaponto, Italy) mint, c. 340 - 330 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Leukippos right, wearing Corinthian helmet, lion head right (control symbol) behind neck, monogram below chin (off flan); reverse barley ear with leaf to left; club above leaf, AMI (magistrate) below leaf on left (off flan), META on right; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€276.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

|Roman| |Macedonia|, |Roman| |Macedonia,| |"Thasian"| |Type,| |c.| |148| |-| |80| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS95927. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 759 var. (O AE1 / R 603); Lanz (Kostial) 963 - 967; SNG Cop 1040 ff., Choice VF, toned, light graffito (AP?) obverse right, bumps and marks, edge crack, weight 16.835 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $300.00 (€276.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Kalchedon, Bithynia Countermark

|Greek| |Countermarked|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Kalchedon,| |Bithynia| |Countermark||drachm|
Similar head (some Demeter, some Apollo, possibly some Persephone) with K or KA monogram countermarks were found along with coins countermarked at Byzantium in the Buyukcekmece Hoard. That find provides almost certain proof that the countermarks were applied at Kalchedon. It was previously believe the head K countermarks were applied at Kallatis because some coins with these Kalchedon countermarks also bear KAΛ countermarks from Kallatis. Based on the mint dates and wear of coins in the hoard, the Buyukcekmece burial may have been connected to the war between Byzantium and Rhodes in 220/219 B.C.
SL95875. Silver drachm, countermark: See Price p. 69 and Buyukcekmece Hoard pp. 18 ff. for similar countermarks from Calchedon, NGC VF, strike 4/5, surface 1/5, scratches (5872605-039), weight 3.94 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, countermark: 280 - 220 B.C.; obverse Herakles head right wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress, countermark: head right (Apollo?), K right (and A or die break lower right), all within 8.5mm circular punch; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right; NGC| Lookup; very rare countermark; $240.00 (€220.80)


Kroton, Bruttium, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

|Italy|, |Kroton,| |Bruttium,| |c.| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.||AE| |19|
 
SL86538. Bronze AE 19, Attianese 504; BMC Italy p. 356, 114; cf. HN Italy 2225 (2.7g); Weber 1047 (same); München 1478 (head left, 3.3g); SNG ANS -; SNG Cop -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (2490384-011), weight 5.058 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 270o, Kroton (Crotone, Calbria, Italy) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse crab seen from above, KPΩ below, within a shallow round incuse; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; NGC| Lookup; very rare; $200.00 (€184.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Kition, Cyprus

|Cyprus|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |the| |Great,| |336| |-| |323| |B.C.,| |Kition,| |Cyprus||unit|
The "arrow" on this coin is very unusual. The description of Price 3119 includes a KT monogram but followed by (?). The monogram is missing from all examples known to Forum. We suspect the KT monogram does not exist on any Alexander bronze from Kition.
GB95811. Bronze unit, cf. Tziambazis 6, Price 3119, Bank of Cyprus --, gVF, nice green patina with buff earthen highlighting, light marks, porosity, tight flan, weight 4.731 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 225o, Kition (Larnaca, Cyprus) mint, 336 - 323 B.C. (perhaps later); obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse club right above, AΛEΞAN∆POY across center, open-mouth quiver, arrow(?) and bow below; $200.00 (€184.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 225 - 170 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |225| |-| |170| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95933. Silver triobol, Tsangari 507 (D13/R16); BCD Akarnania 472; SNG Cop III 14; BMC Thessaly p. 196, 26; HGC 4 950 (R1), aVF, attractive toning, scratches, tight flan, flan flaw rev. lower right, small edge split, weight 2.261 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 225o, Aitolian mint, c. 225 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above sloping downward parallel to boar's back, (ΠA monogram) below, ∆I and spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; $200.00 (€184.00)


Aetolian League, Aetolia, Greece, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

|Aetolia|, |Aetolian| |League,| |Aetolia,| |Greece,| |c.| |170| |-| |160| |B.C.||triobol|
The Aetolian League was a confederation of tribal communities and cities centered in central Greece, probably established to oppose Macedon and the Achaean League. Other Greeks considered Aetolians to be semi-barbaric, but their league had an effective political and administrative structure and a powerful army. By the end of the 3rd century B.C., it controlled the whole of central Greece outside Attica. At its height, the league included Locris, Malis, Dolopes, part of Thessaly, Phocis, and Acarnania. Some Mediterranean city-states, such as Kydonia on Crete, joined. As the first Greek ally of the Roman Republic, the league helped defeat Philip V of Macedon. Roman meddling in Greek affairs shifted opinion and a few years later the league sided with Antiochus III, the anti-Roman Seleucid king. Antiochus' defeat in 189 B.C. forced the league to sign a treaty that allowed it to exist but made it an feeble pawn of the Roman Republic.
GS95934. Silver triobol, Tsangari 1243 (D109/R181), BCD Akarnania 491, HGC 4 952, BMC Thessaly p. 196, 24 var. (Πo monogram), SNG Cop III -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven toning, scratches, weight 2.456 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 90o, Aitolian mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse head of Aetolia right, wearing kausia; reverse the Calydonian boar standing right, AITΩΛΩN above, monogram in left field, ΠO below, spearhead right in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $200.00 (€184.00)


Erythrai, Ionia, c. 550 - 500 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit

|Archaic| |Electrum|, |Erythrai,| |Ionia,| |c.| |550| |-| |500| |B.C.,| |Ancient| |Counterfeit||1/48| |stater|
During the second half of the 6th century, Erythrai struck an extensive issue hektai with head of Herakles on the obverse and an incuse square on the reverse. The earliest coins had a crude archaic style head and a simple square punch. The later coins were more refined archaic style with a quadripartite incuse square reverse. We do not know of any official coins of this small denomination.
GA97741. Fouree electrum plated 1/48 stater, cf. BMC Ionia p. 117, 7 (electrum hekte, 2.55g, official, Erythrai), aVF, areas of missing plating, bumps and scratches, weight 0.370 g, maximum diameter 6.0 mm, unofficial counterfeiter's mint, c. 550 - 500 B.C.; obverse archaic style head of Herakles left, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, almond shaped eye, large nose; reverse irregular roughly square incuse punch; $200.00 (€184.00)


Kingdom of Characene, Attambelos I, c. 47 - 24 B.C.

|Kingdom| |of| |Characene|, |Kingdom| |of| |Characene,| |Attambelos| |I,| |c.| |47| |-| |24| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
Characene was a kingdom controlling the head of the Persian Gulf, important link in the trade with India, and was founded by Aspasine, a rebellious satrap of Antiochos IV. The kingdom was later under Parthian control and then conquered by the Sasanians. It is said that Trajan visited the capital Charax during his invasion of Parthia and seeing the ships sailing to India lamented for not being younger and not able to go there, as Alexander did.
SL96469. Silver tetradrachm, Cohen DCA 486; cf. Nicolet-Pierre Thionèsis pl. IV, 14 - 15 (years SE 281 and 283), Hill Attambelos –; BMC Arabia –, NGC Ch VF, strike 4/4, surface 2/5 (5771210-007), weight 11.248 g, maximum diameter 28.7 mm, die axis 0o, Charax-Spasinu (Naysan, Iraq) mint, 32 - 29 B.C.; obverse diademed head with long beard; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ATTAMBHΛOY downward lines right, ΣΩTHPOΣ / KAI EYEPΓETOY downward lines left, Herakles naked seated left on a cuirass, club in right hand resting on right knee, monograms (control) above arm, local Semitic script letter below arm, [...]ΠΣ (first letter uncertain, year 281 - 283 Seleukid era) in exergue; NGC| Lookup; $180.00 (€165.60)




  



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