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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros||View Options:  |  |  |   


Roman Bronze, Figure of Perseus Holding Head of Medusa, c. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

|Metal| |Antiquities|, |Roman| |Bronze,| |Figure| |of| |Perseus| |Holding| |Head| |of| |Medusa,| |c.| |1st| |-| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.|
King Polydektes commanded Perseus to fetch the head of Medusa. With the help of the gods, Perseus obtained the helmet of Hades, which made him invisible, a reflective shield, and a magical harpa sword. Stealing the single eye of the Graeae, he compelled them to reveal the location of the Gorgones. Perseus approached Medusa as she slept and beheaded her with eyes averted to avoid her petrifying visage. Invisibility protected him from her vengeful sisters. On his journey back to Greece, Perseus came across the Ethiopian princess Andromeda chained to a rock as a sacrifice to a sea-monster. He slew the beast and brought her with him back to Greece as his bride. He returned to King Polydektes and turned him to stone, before traveling on to his grandfather's kingdom to claim the throne.

Bronzes of Herakles are abundant in the many museum collections reviewed by Forum, but Perseus is missing from most. We did not find any figures similar to this one in the many references checked.
AB23901. Roman Bronze, Figure of Perseus Holding Head of Medusa; BnF Bronzes -, Morgan Bronzes -, ROM Metalware -, BMC Bronzes -, Louvre Bronzes -, Choice, green patina, intact except for missing blade and mounting peg on left foot, reverse bronze standing figure of Perseus, 13cm (5") tall, nude but for the Phrygian helmet of Hades on his head, holding Medusa's head by the hair in his right hand, his harpa (blade missing) in his left hand, stand provided; ex Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art (Boca Raton FL); rare; $2800.00 SALE PRICE $2520.00


Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter as Satrap, 323 - 305 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Ptolemy| |I| |Soter| |as| |Satrap,| |323| |-| |305| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander||tetradrachm|NEW
This type, struck with a fantastic heroic high-relief image of Herakles, was until recently attributed to Berytos. We do not know the reason for the reattribution to the Byblos mint but the change has been widely accepted.
SH110494. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3420 (Berytos), HGC 10 103 (Berytos), NGC AU, Strike: 4/5, Surface: 2/5, die shift (6154898-001), weight 16.612 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 330o, Phoenicia, Byblos (Jbail, Lebanon) mint, c. 320/19 - 315 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Atophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, B (control) left, OI (control) under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind; with NGC tag, removed from plastic case; NGC| Lookup ; scarce; $650.00 SALE PRICE $585.00


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

|Other| |Phrygia|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.,| |Cotiaeum,| |Phrygia||tetrassarion|
Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Asklepios' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asklepios learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP110209. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG Hunt 2048; SNG Mu 333 var. (rev. leg.); SNG Cop 337 var. (same) BMC Phrygia p. 177, 94 var. (bust); SNGvA 3791 var. (Telesphoros in center), VF, dark near black patina, light deposits, near centered, die wear, small rev. die crack/breaks, weight 7.089 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 195o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AVT K Π ΛIK OVAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠ Π AIΛ ∆HMHETPIANOY IΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios hipparchos, HM ligate), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; AP/X (archon) in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN (ΩN ligate) in exergue; $125.00 SALE PRICE $113.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Gallienus,| |August| |253| |-| |September| |268| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |29|
Paul of Tarsus gave his first sermon to the Gentiles (Acts 13:13-52) at Antiochia in Pisidia, and visited the city once on each of his missionary journeys, helping to make Antioch a center of early Christianity in Anatolia. Antioch in Pisidia is also known as Antiochia Caesareia and Antiochia in Phrygia.
RP110456. Bronze AE 29, Krzyzanowska pl. LIII, XVI/37; SNG Hunterian I 2144; cf. SNGvA 4985; SNG Pfalz 165; BMC Lycia -; SNG Cop -; SNG BnF -, VF, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits porous, legends weak, weight 12.597 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, Aug 253 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse IMP GALIHNVS PIVS AV, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANTIOSHI COL (sic), she-wolf Lupa Romana right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, head turned back left, tree arching above, S R in exergue; $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Kyzikos, Mysia, 222 - 235 A.D.

|Cyzicus|, |Kyzikos,| |Mysia,| |222| |-| |235| |A.D.||AE| |18|NEW
Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. It was said to have been founded by Pelasgians from Thessaly, according to tradition at the coming of the Argonauts; later, allegedly in 756 B.C., it received many colonists from Miletus. Owing to its advantageous position it speedily acquired commercial importance, and the gold staters of Cyzicus were a staple currency in the ancient world till they were superseded by those of Philip of Macedon. The site of Cyzicus, located on the Erdek and Bandirma roads, is protected by Turkey's Ministry of Culture.
RP110475. Bronze AE 18, SNGvA 7359; RPC Online VI T3741 (3 spec.); SNG BnF -; SNG Cop -; SNG Tb -; SNG Righetti -; BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered, green patina, scratches, weight 3.189 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, time of Severus Alexander, 222 - 235 A.D.; obverse KVZI-KOC, beardless, diademed youthful head of the hero Kyzikos (mythical founder of the city) right; reverse KVZI-KH,NΩN (last three letters in exergue, N's reversed), bull standing right; ; rare; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Akrasos, Lydia

|Other| |Lydia|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Akrasos,| |Lydia||AE| |19|NEW
Akrasos was probably located on the upper course of the Caicus River. The site remains unknown. Even which river was once called the Caicus is uncertain. It is believed to be the modern Bakircay River in Turkey. Nothing is known of the city beyond its coinage.
RP110214. Bronze AE 19, GRPC Lydia 60 (same dies), SNG Mn 22, Winterthur 3678, SNG Tire 320, Lindgren I 709 corr. (obv. leg.), BMC Lydia -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, Choice VF, well centered, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, weight 3.240 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 180o, Acrasus mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV K Λ CEP CEOVHPO-C, laureate head right; reverse AKPACIΩTΩN, Asklepios standing facing, head left, wearing himation, right hand on serpent-entwined staff; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

|Troas|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Alexandreia| |Troas,| |Troas||AE| |24|NEW
Alexandria Troas struck with great variation in legends, portraits, and reverse types. A laureate head, the legends, and the wolf and twins are all published, but not these dies and not combined on one coin. The reverse legend dates this coin to after 214, when Caracalla renamed the city from Colonia Augusta Troadensium to Colonia Alexandria Augusta.
RP110470. Bronze AE 24, Apparently unpublished variety; Bellinger Troy -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mun -, SNG Tub -, SNG Hunt -, SNG anakkale -, BMC Troas -, F, broad flan with full legends, dark green patina, earthen encrustation, light scratches, weight 9.434 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, 214 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse ANTONIN-VS PIVS A-V, bearded, laureate head right, bare right shoulder seen from behind; reverse ALEX AVG, she-wolf standing left, head right, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, COL in exergue; zero sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades, no other specimens known to FORVM; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Selge, Pisidia, c. 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Pisidia|, |Selge,| |Pisidia,| |c.| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.||chalkous|
Selge, Pisidia on the southern slope of Mount Taurus where the river Eurymedon (Kprcay) forces its way through the mountains, was once the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia. Protected by precipices, torrents, and an army of 20,000 regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, Selge was never subject to a foreign power until Rome. In the 5th century A.D., Zosimus calls it a little town, but it was still strong enough to repel a body of Goths. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best-conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century A.D.
GB86924. Bronze chalkous, SNG BnF 1979; SNG Cop 263; SNGvA 5288; SNG PfPs 368; BMC Lycia p. 262, 47; SGCV II 5491, gF, tight flan (as usual for the type), weight 3.363 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Selge (southern slope of Mount Taurus, Turkey) mint, c. 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, club over left shoulder; reverse winged thunderbolt, arc (bow?) on right, top end of arc ornamented with a stag head, Σ−E−Λ divided low across field; $70.00 SALE PRICE $63.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Nikopolis ad Istrum, Moesia Inferior

|Nikopolis|, |Septimius| |Severus,| |9| |April| |193| |-| |4| |February| |211| |A.D.,| |Nikopolis| |ad| |Istrum,| |Moesia| |Inferior||assarion|
Nicopolis ad Istrum was founded by Trajan around 101-106, at the junction of the Iatrus (Yantra) and the Rositsa rivers, in memory of his victory over the Dacians. Its ruins are located at the village of Nikyup, 20 km north of Veliko Tarnovo in northern Bulgaria. The town peaked during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian, the Antonines and the Severan dynasty. In 447, Nicopolis was destroyed by Attila's Huns. In the 6th century, it was rebuilt as a powerful fortress enclosing little more than military buildings and churches, following a very common trend for the cities of that century in the Danube area. It was finally destroyed by the Avar invasions at the end of the 6th century.
RP96856. Bronze assarion, H-H-J Nikopolis 8.14.14.19 (R2), Varbanov I 2359 (R3), AMNG I/I 1387, Moushmov 1013 var. (Herakles' head right), SNG Cop 267 var., BMC Thrace -, VF, nice green patina, light marks, encrustations, ragged edge, weight 3.890 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikyup, Bulgaria) mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse AV Λ C CEVHPOC, laureate head right; reverse NIKOΠO−ΛIT ΠPOC IC, Herakles standing slightly left, head left, nude, leaning on grounded club in right hand, skin of the Nemean lion draped over left arm; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00


Sardes, Lydia, c. 212 - 217 A.D.

|Sardes|, |Sardes,| |Lydia,| |c.| |212| |-| |217| |A.D.||AE| |17|
The Zeus who was worshiped at Laodicea was a Hellenized form of the old native god, Mn. Mn had been the king and father of his people. When Greeks settled in the area they continued to worship the god whose power was supreme in the district, but they identified him with their own god Zeus. Thus at Sardis and elsewhere in the region the native god became Zeus Lydios.
RP110060. Bronze AE 17, SNG Munchen 499; BMC Lydia p. 248, 86; Johnston Sardis 262; Lindgren-Kovacs A809A; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, centered, porous, central dimple on reverse, weight 2.265 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 195o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, time of Caracalla, c. 212 - 217 A.D.; obverse ZEYC - ΛY∆IOC, diademed and draped bust of Zeus Lydios right; reverse CAP∆IANΩN, Herakles standing facing, head left, nude, resting right hand on grounded club, Nemean lion-skin on left arm; $60.00 SALE PRICE $54.00




  



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