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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Heros||View Options:  |  |  |   


Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Ionia, c. 282 - 225 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Magnesia| |ad| |Meandrum|, |Magnesia| |ad| |Maeandrum,| |Ionia,| |c.| |282| |-| |225| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||tetradrachm|
Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
SH98009. Silver tetradrachm, Price 2019, Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Saroglos –, SNG München -, Mektepini -, VF, obverse a little off center, light bumps and marks, small dark areas, weight 17.070 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 282 - 225 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, monogram left, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, meander pattern in exergue; from the CEB Collection, ex Numismatic Fine Arts (Beverly Hills, CA); Coin Archives records only one specimen of the type at auction in the last two decades; very rare; $800.00 (€656.00)


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Ilion (Troy), Troas

|Troas|, |Commodus,| |March| |or| |April| |177| |-| |31| |December| |192| |A.D.,| |Ilion| |(Troy),| |Troas||AE| |24|
In Greek and Roman mythology, Hector was a Trojan prince and the greatest warrior for Troy in the Trojan War. He acted as leader of the Trojans and their allies in the defense of Troy, killing countless Greek warriors. He was ultimately killed by Achilles.

Did Hector really live? The most valuable historical evidence for the Battle of Troy are treaties and letters mentioned in Hittite cuneiform texts of the same approximate era, which identify an unruly Western Anatolian warlord named Piyama-Radu (possibly Priam) and his successor Alaksandu (possibly Alexander, the nickname of Paris) both based in Wilusa (possibly Ilios), as well as the god Apaliunas (possibly Apollo). The name E-ko-to (along with 20 other names from the myth) is known from Linear B tablets, not referring to the hero, but proving that this name existed in Greek in Mycenaean times.
RP97548. Brass AE 24, cf. Bellinger Troy T192; SNG München XIX 254; SNG Cop 405, BMC Troas -, F, rough, parts of legends illegible, central dimple (as usual for the type) on reverse, weight 8.121 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ilion (Troy), Troas mint, Mar/Apr 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.; obverse AV K M (or Λ?) AY - KOMO∆OC, laureate and draped bust right; reverse E-KTOP, Hector of Troy galloping biga right, head turned back left, wearing helmet and military dress, transverse spear in right hand, shield and reins in left hand, IΛIEΩN in exergue; extremely rare, Coin Archives records only one sale of this type in the past two decades (also listed are a few specimens of the similar and also very rare AE36 and AE19 Hector reverse types struck for Commodus at Ilion); $500.00 (€410.00)


Temnos, Aeolis, c. 188 - 170 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander The Great

|Aeolis|, |Temnos,| |Aeolis,| |c.| |188| |-| |170| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |and| |Types| |of| |Alexander| |The| |Great||tetradrachm|
Temnos (Temnus) on the western coast of Anatolia near the Hermus River, was a small Greek city-state of Aeolis, later incorporated in the Roman province of Asia. Under Augustus it was already on the decline, under Tiberius it was destroyed by an earthquake, and in the time of Pliny (23 - 79 A.D.) it was no longer inhabited. It was, however, rebuilt later. One of the city's more noteworthy figures was the rhetorician Hermagoras.
GS98012. Silver tetradrachm, Price 1688, Müller Alexander 959, SNG Alpha Bank 602, SNG Saroglos 430, SNG Munchen 497, VF, broad flan, bumps and marks, areas of porosity, die wear, weight 16.219 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 0o, Aeolis, Temnos (Menemen?, Izmir, Turkey) mint, c. 188 - 170 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on high-backed throne, bare to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, two monograms above vine tendril with grapes around oinochoe in left field; from the CEB Collection, big 34 mm flan!; $400.00 (€328.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |c.| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander||tetradrachm|
Struck after Alexander's death, under Antipater, one of the regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
GS98125. Silver tetradrachm, Price 109, Müller Alexander 650, Troxell issue G2, SNG Delepierre 984, SNG Munchen 272, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG Cop -, VF, well centered and struck, iridescent blue toning, bumps, two test cuts, flattened on reverse opposite of chisel cuts, weight 17.18 g, maximum diameter 26.29 mm, die axis 0o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, struck under Antipater, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Athena Promachos (control symbol) lower left; $300.00 (€246.00)


Isaura Palaia(?), Cilicia, c. 335 - 325 B.C.

|Cilicia|, |Isaura| |Palaia(?),| |Cilicia,| |c.| |335| |-| |325| |B.C.||hemiobol|
Göktürk attributed this type to Isaura Palaia (Bozkir, Turkey), but this attribution remains uncertain.
GS96991. Silver hemiobol, Göktürk p. 150, 86 (Isaura Palaia), SNG Kayhan 1062, SNG Levante -; SNG BnF -, gVF, attractive style, toned, flow lines, tight squared flan, top of lion's head off flan, weight 0.294 g, maximum diameter 8.1 mm, die axis 180o, Isaura Palaia(?) mint, c. 335 - 325 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles facing slightly left; reverse facing head of lion, YAYPCOM (or similar) below; ex Leu Numismatik web auction 13 (15 Aug 2020), lot 459; ex Roma e-sale 52 (10 Jan 2019), lot 324; extremely rare; $250.00 (€205.00)


Lysimacheia, Thracian Chersonese, c. 225 - 198 B.C.

|Lysimacheia|, |Lysimacheia,| |Thracian| |Chersonese,| |c.| |225| |-| |198| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Lysimachia was built by Lysimachus in 309 B.C. On the isthmus, it commanded the road from Sestos and mainland Thrace. To obtain inhabitants for his new city, Lysimachus destroyed neighboring Cardia and settled the inhabitants of it and other Chersonese cities here. Lysimachus made Lysimachia the capital of his kingdom and it must have rapidly risen to great splendor and prosperity.

Almost every example of this type known to Forum has the lion head countermark on the obverse.
CM97507. Bronze AE 23, SNG Cop 904 (same countermarks); BMC Thrace p. 195, 3; HGC 3.2 1495 (R1), aVF, dark patina with lighter blue highlighting, overstruck(?), weight 8.961 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antiochia ad Maeandrum (near Basaran Turkey) mint, c. 225 - 199/8 B.C.; obverse head of young Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; countermark: lion's head facing with mane around in round punch; reverse ΛYΣIMA-XEΩN, Artemis standing right, wearing short chiton, quiver and bow over shoulder, holding long torch (two torches?) with both hands; countermark: head of grain in oval punch; from the Michael Arslan Collection; rare; $250.00 (€205.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX Soter II, 116 - 110 B.C. and 109 - 107 B.C.

|Ptolemaic| |Egypt|, |Ptolemaic| |Kingdom| |of| |Egypt,| |Cleopatra| |III| |and| |Ptolemy| |IX| |Soter| |II,| |116| |-| |110| |B.C.| |and| |109| |-| |107| |B.C.||obol|
The reattribution from Ptolemy V to Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX is based on a hoard found in Egypt and the contents of an Egyptian shipwreck that contained these coins mixed with tetradrachms attributed with certainty to Ptolemy IX and Cleopatra III. The ΣΩ in the left field probably refers to the epithet of Ptolemy IX Soter II.
GP95822. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1191, Weiser 114, SNG Cop 534, Noeske 187, Cohen DCA 35, VF, highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan cutting off right side of reverse legend, old scratch, obverse edge beveled, central depressions, weight 8.199 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, series 8, 115 - 114 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, K behind; reverse ΠToΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, Ω over Σ in left field, LΓ (year 3) in right field; rare; $200.00 (€164.00)


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

|Roman| |Military| |Mint|, |Roman| |Macedonia,| |"Thasian"| |Type,| |c.| |148| |-| |80| |B.C.||tetradrachm|
This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS96871. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 694 (VAC3/R551); Lukanc 339 (same dies); SNG Cop 1042 (Thasos), VF, toned, punch on reverse, slight bend to flan, marks and light scratches, light graffito X below chin, weight 16.620 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; ex Trusted Coins; $190.00 (€155.80)


Diadumenian, Mid May - 8 June 218 A.D., Laodicea ad Mar, Seleucia and Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Diadumenian,| |Mid| |May| |-| |8| |June| |218| |A.D.,| |Laodicea| |ad| |Mar,| |Seleucia| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||AE| |31|
Laodicea ad Mar (Latakia, Syria) has been inhabited since the second millennium B.C. It was on the Via Maris, a coastal road that ran south from Antioch to Damascus and Beirut. The city was renamed by Seleucus I Nicator in honor of his mother, Laodice and was a major port for the Seleukid Kingdom. Laodicea flourished under Rome and was second only to Antioch in the region. Herod the Great, king of Judaea, furnished Laodicea with an aqueduct, the remains of which stand to the east of the town. The Legio VI Ferrata was probably based in Laodicea.
JD97397. Bronze AE 31, Lindgren-Kovacs 2099, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Munchen -, SNG Righetti -, aF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, porosity/corrosion, edge split, weight 13.695 g, maximum diameter 31.4 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, as caesar, 11 Apr 217 - mid May 218 A.D.; obverse IM M OP ANTONINOS NOB CAES, bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right seen from the front; reverse ROMAE FEL, she-wolf right suckling Romulus and Remus; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; very rare; $140.00 (€114.80)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 289 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Agathokles,| |317| |-| |289| |B.C.||litra|
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI93452. Bronze litra, cf. Calciati II p. 287, 150; BMC Sicily p. 196, 389; SNG ANS 740; SNG Cop 767 ff.; HGC 2 1465 (R1), aVF, well centered, a little rough, weight 8.083 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 305 - 295 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of young Herakles left, wearing taenia; reverse lion walking right, right foreleg raised, club right above; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $110.00 (€90.20)




  



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