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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Medieval & Modern Coins| ▸ |United Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the United Kingdom
Anglo-Gallic, Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Aquitaine, 1355 - 1375

|France|, |Anglo-Gallic,| |Edward| |the| |Black| |Prince,| |Prince| |of| |Aquitaine,| |1355| |-| |1375||Hardi| |d'Argent|
Edward the Black Prince was the eldest son of King Edward III and the father of King Richard II of England. He was the first Duke of Cornwall (from 1337), the Prince of Wales (from 1343) and the Prince of Aquitaine (1362-72). He was an exceptional military leader, and his victories over the French at the Battles of Crcy and Poitiers made him very popular in England during his lifetime. In 1348 he was made a Founding Knight of the Garter. Edward died one year before his father, becoming the first English Prince of Wales not to become King of England. The throne passed instead to his son Richard II, a minor, upon the death of Edward III.
ME98515. Silver Hardi d'Argent, SCBC-SII 8134; Elias 202; Withers AGC 224; Poey d'Avant 2970; Duplessy Fodales 1126; Elias Collection 310; Boudeau 513; Hewlett p. 140, type 2,1, aVF, toned, red deposits, weight 1.080 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 225o, Bordeaux mint, 1362 - 1372; obverse ED PO GnS REG AGLIE B (Edwardvus, Primo Genitvs Regis Anglie, Limoges - Edward, first born of the King of England, Bordeaux [mint]), half-length figure of Edward facing beneath Gothic canopy, sword in right hand, raising left in benediction; reverse *PRI-CPS* - AQIT-AnIE (rosette stops, Princeps Aqvitanie - Prince of Aquitaine), long cross patte, lis in first and fourth quarters, leopard in second and third quarters; ex CNG e-auction 495 (07 Jul 2021), lot 796; ex CNG e-auction 468 (20 May 2020), lot 817; from the James & Martha Robertson Collection; ex Tom Cederlind BBS 145 (18 Dec 2007); $500.00 SALE PRICE $450.00


England, Elizabeth I, 17 November 1558 - 24 March 1603

|England|, |England,| |Elizabeth| |I,| |17| |November| |1558| |-| |24| |March| |1603||shilling|
At twenty-five years old, Elizabeth inherited a weak bankrupt nation, torn by religious discord. Her supporters counseled that her only hope, was to marry quickly and lean upon her husband. Instead, she ruled alone for nearly half a century, driven by her genuine love for her subjects. She is perhaps the greatest English monarch in history.
UK98524. Silver shilling, SCBC 2549, North 1985, gF, dark toning, some weakness in portrait, flan crack, weight 5.436 g, maximum diameter 32.2 mm, die axis 270o, London (Tower) mint, 1st issue, 1560 - 1561; obverse (cross crosslet) ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA ET HIB REGINA (Elizabeth, by the Grace of God, Queen of England, France, and Ireland), crowned bust left, decorated dress, wire and bead inner circles; reverse (cross crosslet) POSVI DEV ADIVTOREM MEV (I have made God my helper), coat-of-arms (passant lions and fleurs-de-lis) on long cross fourche, wire and bead inner circles; ex Leu Numismatik web-auction 16 (25 May 2021), lot 5069 (part of); ex collection of a Swiss scholar (formed over the past thirty years); $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


England, Henry III, 1216 - 1272 A.D.

|England|, |England,| |Henry| |III,| |1216| |-| |1272| |A.D.||penny|
Henry III became king as a boy of nine years and reigned fifty-six years, during which England prospered. He made Westminster the seat of government and expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor. He spent much of his reign fighting the barons over the Magna Carta and the royal rights, and was eventually forced to call the first "parliament" in 1264. On the Continent, he unsuccessfully endeavored to re-establish English control over Normandy, Anjou, and Aquitaine.
ME98512. Silver penny, SCBC 1356-C7c, North 980(A), aVF, toned, uneven strike with some legend weak, weight 1.459 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 90o, Canterbury mint, c. 1236 - 1242; obverse hENRICVS REX (King Henry, large letters), crowned head facing, crown with cross, cruciform scepter in right hand, crude portrait, two curls of hair without pellets within on each side of head, no chin, faint beard; reverse IOHAN ON CANT ([moneyer] Iohan, Canterbury [mint], large letters, A with square top), short voided cross with quatrefoil in each angle; ex Leu Numismatik web-auction 16 (25 May 2021), lot 5069 (part of); ex collection of a Swiss scholar (formed over the past thirty years); $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||sixpence|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98543. Silver sixpence, SCBC 3814, SCWC KM 691, AU, cleaned, weight 2.814 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1825; obverse GEORGIUS IIII D:G: BRITANNIAR: REX: F: D:, Laureate head left, tiny B.P. below (engraver Benedetto Pistrucci); reverse HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE (shame on him who thinks evil of it - the motto of the Order of the Garter), crowned coat of arms in garter, ANNO 1825 below; $150.00 SALE PRICE $135.00


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830, For Use in Malta

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830,| |For| |Use| |in| |Malta||1/3| |farthing|
George IV was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later. He had already been serving as Prince Regent since 5 February 1811, during his father's final mental illness. He led an extravagant lifestyle that contributed to the fashions of the Regency era. He was a patron of new forms of leisure, style and taste. He commissioned John Nash to build the Royal Pavilion in Brighton and remodel Buckingham Palace. He commissioned Jeffry Wyatville to rebuild Windsor Castle.
UK98539. Bronze 1/3 farthing, SCBC 3827, SCWC KM 703, EF, small scratches and marks, weight 1.446 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1st issue, 1827; obverse GEORGIUS IV DEI GRATIA 1827, Laureate head left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF, Britannia seated right, floral pattern in exergue; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||farthing|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98540. Copper farthing, Peck 1414, SCBC 3822, SCWC KM 677, AU, tiny scratches and marks, weight 4.732 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1st issue, 1822; obverse GEORGIUS IIII DEI GRATIA (George IV, by the grace of God), laureate and draped bust left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of The British territories, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, arm on shield, holding laurel branch and trident, 1822 below; $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


England, Elizabeth I, 17 November 1558 - 24 March 1603

|England|, |England,| |Elizabeth| |I,| |17| |November| |1558| |-| |24| |March| |1603||groat|
At twenty-five years old, Elizabeth inherited a weak bankrupt nation, torn by religious discord. Her supporters counseled that her only hope, was to marry quickly and lean upon her husband. Instead, she ruled alone for nearly half a century, driven by her genuine love for her subjects. She is perhaps the greatest English monarch in history.
UK98518. Silver groat, SCBC 2551, North 1986, F, toned, bent, scratches, weight 1.660 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Tower mint, 1558 - 1560; obverse (lis) ELIZABETH D G ANG FRA Z HIB REGI (Elizabeth, by the Grace of God, Queen of England, France and Ireland), marlet mint mark, crowned bust left, wire and beaded inner circles; reverse (lis) POSVI:DEV'ADIVTOREM MEV: (I have made God my helper), quartered coat-of-arms (passant lions and fleurs-de-lis) on long cross fourche, wire and beaded inner circles; ex Leu Numismatik web-auction 16 (25 May 2021), lot 5069 (part of); ex collection of a Swiss scholar (formed over the past thirty years); $110.00 SALE PRICE $99.00


Great Britain, William IV, 26 June 1830 - 20 June 1837

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |William| |IV,| |26| |June| |1830| |-| |20| |June| |1837||farthing|
William IV was the third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV, he was the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover. He was nicknamed the "Sailor King" because he served in the Royal Navy in his youth. He served in North America and the Caribbean. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne at 64 years old. His reign saw reforms: the poor law was updated, child labor restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all the Empire, and the electoral system was reformed. Although William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a prime minister contrary to the will of Parliament. He granted his German kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution. At the time of his death, William had no surviving legitimate children, but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for twenty years. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece, Victoria, and in Hanover by his brother, Ernest Augustus.
UK98546. Copper farthing, SCBC 3848, SCWC KM 705, gVF, light stains, small scratches and marks, weight 4.796 g, maximum diameter 21.9 mm, die axis 0o, London mint, 1831; obverse GULIELMUS IIII DEI GRATIA (William the 4th, by the Grace of God), bare head right, incuse W.W (engraver William Wyon) on base of neck truncation, 1831 below; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of the Britains, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, resting right hand on shield at side, incuse line on saltire, trident in left hand, rose below; $100.00 SALE PRICE $90.00


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||farthing|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98541. Copper farthing, Peck 1414, SCBC 3822, SCWC KM 677, gVF, small scratches and marks, weight 4.622 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1st issue, 1826; obverse GEORGIUS IIII DEI GRATIA (George IV, by the grace of God), laureate and draped bust left; reverse BRITANNIAR: REX FID: DEF: (King of The British territories, Defender of the Faith), Britannia seated right, arm on shield, holding laurel branch and trident, 1826 below; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Great Britain, George IV, 29 January 1820 - 26 June 1830

|United| |Kingdom|, |Great| |Britain,| |George| |IV,| |29| |January| |1820| |-| |26| |June| |1830||sixpence|
From 1811 until his accession, George IV served as regent during his father's mental illness. He forbade his wife from attending his coronation and unsuccessfully attempted to divorce her, which brought the contempt of the people. For most of George's regency and reign, Prime Minister Lord Liverpool controlled the government with little help from George. George's extravagant lifestyle and wasteful spending angered taxpayers at a time when Britain was fighting the Napoleonic Wars. He did not provide leadership in a time of crisis, nor did he act as a role model for his people. Liverpool led Britain's ultimate victory, negotiated the peace settlement, and attempted to deal with the social and economic malaise that followed. George IV was succeeded by his younger brother William.
UK98542. Silver sixpence, SCBC 3814, SCWC KM 691, aVF, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 2.770 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 180o, London mint, 1824; obverse GEORGIUS IIII D: G: BRITANNIA REX F:D: (William, by the Grace of God), laureate head left, tiny B.P. below (engraver Benedetto Pistrucci); reverse HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE (shame on him who thinks evil of it - the motto of the Order of the Garter), crowned coat of arms in garter, ANNO 1824 below; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00




  



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REFERENCES

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Woodhead, P. & D. Liddell. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume One, English Gold Coins and their Imitations, Henry III to Elizabeth I, 1257-1603. (London, 1996).
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Catalog current as of Tuesday, May 17, 2022.
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