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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Provincial ▸ Roman MacedoniaView Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins of Macedonia

Macedonia, Roman Protectorate, c. 168 - 166 B.C.

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On 22 June 168 B.C., Lucius Aemilius Paullus defeated the Macedonian King Perseus at the Battle of Pydna, and Macedonia came under Roman rule. This coin was struck shortly after Rome's victory, under the quaestor Gaius Publilius.
GB84140. Bronze AE 22, SNG Cop 1320, MacKay p. 5, BMC Macedonia -, gF, near black dark patina, well centered, obverse high point not fully struck, lower half of reverse very weakly struck, weight 11.367 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, Gaius Publilius, quaestor, 168 - 166 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma (or Perseus) right, helmet with visor and crest, ornamented with scroll, wings, and head of a griffin; reverse ΓAIOY TAMIOY / ΠOΠΛIΛIOY in two lines within oak wreath; rare; $95.00 (€84.55)
 


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Amphipolis was on the Via Egnatia, the principal Roman road crossing the southern Balkans. In 50, the apostle Paul visited Amphipolis on his way to Thessaloniki. Many Christian churches were built indicating prosperity, but the region grew increasingly dangerous. In the 6th century, the population had declined considerably and the old perimeter was no longer defensible against Slavic invasions. The lower city was plundered for materials to fortify the Acropolis. In the 7th century, a new wall was built, right through the bath and basilica, dividing the Acropolis. The remaining artisans moved to houses and workshops built in the unused cisterns of the upper city. In the 8th century, the last inhabitants probably abandoned the city and moved to nearby Chrysopolis (formerly Eion, once the port of Amphipolis).
RP83483. Bronze AE 24, RPC IV online 7653 (5 spec.), SNG Cop 109, SNG Evelpidis 1186, Varbanov III 3244 (R4) var. (obv. leg.), BMC Macedonia p. 57, 116 var. (same), aVF, well centered, bumps, areas of light corrosion, flan flaw (pit) obverse center, weight 8.624 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 188 - 190 A.D.; obverse AVTOK M AVP KOMM ANTΩNEINON, laureate head right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITWN, Tyche seated left on high-backed throne, wearing crown of city walls, right leg drawn back, patera in extended right hand, left elbow on back of throne; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Roman Military in Macedonia, c. 168 B.C., Imitative of Type from Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece

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Sear notes crude Histiaia imitations seem to have been struck in Macedonia just prior to the Roman victory in 168 B.C. During the Republic, Roman military mints sometimes struck imitative types to make local payments. Examples include Thasian imitatives in Macedonia and Philip Philadelphos imitatives at Antioch. This Histiaia type tetrobol is almost certainly one of the imitatives struck in Macedonia by the Roman military.
GS77476. Silver tetrobol, See SGCV I p. 233 note following 2498; regarding imitatives of a 2nd century B.C. type from Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece, F, flan crack, weight 2.048 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 180o, Roman military(?) mint, c. 168 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, wreathed with vine, hair rolled; reverse IΣTIAEΩN, nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of a galley holding naval standard, ornate apluster, wing ornament on hull, trident head and monogram below; $60.00 (€53.40)
 


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Tauropolos is an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as worshiped at Tauris, or pulled by a yoke of bulls, or hunting bull goddess. A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" by Iphigenia in her temple at Brauron in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians. Tauropolia was a festival of Artemis held at Athens. - Wikipedia
RP74291. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 1633; SNG ANS 170; SNG Cop 96; Varbanov III 3141; BMC Macedonia p. 53, 82, aVF, green patina, porous, weight 9.092 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 19 Aug 14 - 16 Mar 37 A.D.; obverse TI KAIΣAP ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head left; reverse AMΦIΠOΛITΩN, Artemis Tauropolos riding aside facing on bull galloping right, holding billowing inflated veil overhead with both hands; $70.00 (€62.30)
 


Koinon of Macedonia, c. 244 - 245 A.D., Portrait of Alexander the Great

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The two temples and legend on the reverse indicate "Two Neokorie," advertising the Koinon of Macedonia held the highly prized designation "double temple guardian" of the imperial cult. The first Nekoros was awarded by Nerva. The second Neokoros, indicated by B (the Greek number two) or rarely ∆IC (double in Greek) on coins, was first received under Elagabalus. The title was rescinded but then later restored by Severus Alexander, probably in 231 A.D.
RP79978. Bronze AE 28, AMNG III 833; Mionnet supp. 3, p. 229, 446; BMC Macedonia -; SNG Cop -; SNG Hunterian -; SNG Bar -; SNG Saroglos -; Lindgren -, gF, obverse rough, smoothing on reverse, weight 11.370 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 90o, Macedonia, Beroea(?) mint, c. 244 -245 A.D.; obverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, diademed head of Alexander the Great right; reverse two hexastyle temple fronts, KOINON / M-AKE∆-O in two lines above, B NEΩKOPΩN / EOC (Era of Actium year 275) below;
very rare; $220.00 (€195.80)
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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The god Kabeiros is similar in appearance to Dionysos and the rites of his cult were likely similar to those of the Dionysian mysteries. The attributes of Kabeiros are a rhyton and hammer.
RP83493. Bronze AE 26, Touratsoglou p. 262, 25 (V2/R20), Varbanov III 4545 (R3), SNG Hunterian 714, SNG Cop 426, SNG Evelpidis 1348, BMC Macedonia p. 124, 116, aVF, excellent portrait, green patina, large centration dimple on obverse, bumps and marks, some light corrosion, weight 9.207 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 29 Jul 238 - 25 Feb 244 A.D.; obverse AV K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros holding hammer in her right hand, palm frond in her left hand; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Mark Antony and Octavian, 2nd Triumvirate, Thessalonica, Macedonia, 37 B.C.

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The obverse and reverse legends combined indicate this coin celebrates the Homonoia between Thessalonica and Rome which was established by the triumvirs.

In 37 B.C., Cleopatra loaned Antony the money for the army. After a five-month siege, the Romans took Jerusalem from the Parthians. Herod the Great made king by Anthony, took control of his capital. Antigonus was taken to Antioch where Antony had him executed. Thousands of Jews were slaughtered by the Roman troops supporting Herod.
RP84077. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 1553; BMC Macedonia p. 113, 43; SNG ANS 806; SNG Cop 378; AMNG III/2, p. 121, 24; McClean 3772, aVF, slightly rough, reverse off center, weight 7.814 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 45o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 37 B.C.; obverse OMONOIA, veiled bust of Homonoia right, wearing stephane; reverse horse galloping right, ΘEΣ/ΣAΛON in two lines above, PΩM below; scarce; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RP79950. Bronze AE 27, Touratsoglou p. 246, 5 (V6/-, unlisted rev. die); SNG Cop 422; Varbanov III 4471 (R3); BMC Macedonia p. 123, 109; SNG ANS 873 var. (bust from behind), VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, small edge split, flan crack, light marks, weight 11.341 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 0o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AV K M AV CEV AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse ΘECCAΛONIKEΩN, Nike advancing left, Kabeiros in extended right hand, palm frond in left hand; scarce; $150.00 (€133.50)
 


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D., Thessalonica, Macedonia

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Thessalonica was founded around 315 B.C. by Cassander, King of Macedonia, on or near the site of the ancient town of Therma. He named it after his wife Thessalonike, a daughter of Philip II and a half-sister of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C. it became the capital of the Macedonia Secunda and in 146 B.C. it was made the capital of the whole Roman province of Macedonia. Due to its port and location at the intersection of two major Roman roads, Thessalonica grew to become the most important city in Macedonia. Thessalonica was important in the spread of Christianity; the First Epistle to the Thessalonians written by Paul the Apostle is the first written book of the New Testament.
RB79951. Bronze AE 29, Touratsoglou p. 186, 7 (V5/R9); RPC Online III 618; Varbanov III 4295 (R4); SNG ANS 849 var. (no crescent), SNG Cop 412 var. (same); BMC Macedonia -, F, excellent portrait, dark green patina, flan adjustment marks, centration dimples, weight 16.494 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Thessalonika (Salonika, Greece) mint, emission 1, phase 1, 25 Jan 98 - 103 A.D.; obverse KAICAP TPAIANOC, laureate head right; reverse ΘECAΛΛONIKEWN, Victory flying right, raising wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left hand, small crescent with horns up in right field; $160.00 (€142.40)
 


Sabina, Augusta 128 - c. 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian, Amphipolis, Macedonia

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Plotina was the wife of Trajan, married to him before his succession. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. In 100, Trajan awarded her with the title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear on the coinage until 112. She was largely responsible for Hadrian's succession to the throne after the death of Trajan. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
RP83496. Bronze AE 25, RPC Online III 655 (8 spec.); BMC Macedonia p. 56, 103; Varbanov 3186 (R5); SNG Evelpidis 1171; Lindgren 987; SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Hunterian -, VF, green patina, tight flan, some corrosion and scratches, reverse off center, centration dimples, weight 12.382 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 128 - c. 136 A.D.; obverse CABEINA CEBACTH, draped bust right wearing stephane, pellet within crescent with horns up left below chin; reverse AMΦIΠOΛTWN, Tyche seated left on high back throne, wearing turreted crown, patera in right hand; rare; $320.00 (€284.80)
 










REFERENCES

Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1906).
Head, B. V. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Josifovski, P. Roman Mint of Stobi. (Skopje, 2001).
Josifovski, P. Stobi - The Kuzmanoviæ Collection, Vol. I. (Skopje, 2010).
Lindgren, H. C. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (1989).
Lindgren, H. C. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (1993).
MacKay, P. A. "Bronze Coinage in Macedonia, 168-166 B.C." in ANS MN 14 (1968), pp. 5 - 13, pl. III.
Prokopov, I. Der Silberprägung der Insel Thasos und die Tetradrachmen des "thasischen Typs" vom 2.-1. Jahrhundert v.Chr. (Berlin, 2006).
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum. Volume 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (New Jersey, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, SNG Grèce, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macédoine-Thessalie-Illyrie-Epire-Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece, Volume IV, Numismatic Museum, Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1987).
Touratsoglou, I. Die Münzstätte von Thessaloniki in der römischen Kaiserzeit. AMUGS XII. (Berlin, 1988).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Volume III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Monday, March 27, 2017.
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Roman Macedonia