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New Style Athenian Tetradrachms, 166/164 - 63/62 B.C.

Coins from Athens for sale in the Forum Ancient Coins shop

Babelon, J. Catalogue de la collection de Luynes: monnaies greques. (Paris, 1924-1936).
Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Boehringer, C. Zur Chronologie mittelhellenistischer Münzserien 220-160 v. Chr. AMUGS V. (Berlin, 1972).
de Callatay, F. "Athenian new style tetradrachms in Macedonian hoards" in AJN 3-4 (New York, 1992).
Flament, C. Le monnayage en argent d'Athènes. De l'époque archaïque à l'époque hellénistique (c. 550-c. 40 av. J.-C.). (Lovain-la-Neuve, 2007).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II: Macedon, Thrace, Thessaly, North western, central and southern Greece. (London, 1924).
Habicht, Ch. "Zu den Münzmagistraten der Silberprägung des Neuen Stils" in Chiron 21 (1991), pp. 1-23.
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Attica - Megaris - Aegina. (London, 1888).
Kraay, C. Archaic and Classical Greek Coinage. (London, 1976). pp. 54-77.
Kraay, C. Coins of Ancient Athens. Minerva Numismatic Handbooks N. 2. (Newcastle upon Tyne, 1968).
Kraay, C. "The archaic owls of Athens: classification and chronology" in NC 166 (1956) 34-68.
Kroll, J. The Athenian Agora. The Greek Coins, Vol. 26. (Princeton, 1993).
Kroll, J. "From Wappenmünzen to Gorgoneia to Owls" in ANSMN 26 (1981) pp. 1-32.
Lewis, D. "The Chronology of the Athenian New Style Coinage" in NC 1962, pp. 275-300.
Macdonald, G. "Amphora letters on coins of Athens" in NC 19 (1899), pp. 288 - 321.
Macdonald, G. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Collection, University of Glascow, Vol II: N.W. Greece, Central Greece, S. Greece, and Asia Minor. (Glasgow, 1901).
Mattingly, H. "The Beginning of Athenian New Style Silver Coinage" in NC 150 (1990), pp. 67-78.
Mørkholm, O. "The Chronology of the New Style Silver Coinage of Athens" in ANSMN 29 (1984), pp. 29–42.
Puglisi, M. "La monetazione bronzea di nuovo stile ateniese" in Rivista Italiana di Numismatica 97 (1996), pp. 43-82.
Robinson, E. & G. Jenkins. A Catalogue of the Calouste Gulbenkian Collection of Greek Coins, Vol. II: Greece to East. (Lisboa, 89).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Svoronos, J. Les monnaies d'Athenes. (Munich, 1923-26).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (New Jersey, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 14: Attika, Megaris, Ägina. (Berlin, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 3: Macedonia - Aegina (gold and silver). (London, 1942).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden: Sammlung Eric von Post. (Stockholm, 1995).
Sundwall, J. "Ueber eine neue attische Serie" in ZfN 26 (1908), pp. 273 - 274.
Sundwall, J. Untersuchungen über die attischen Münzen des neueren Stiles. (Helsingfors, 1907).
Thompson, M. The New Style Silver Coinage of Athens. ANSNS 10 (New York, 1961). PDF Plates Online

The "New Style" tetradrachms were issued by Athens as a semi-autonomous city under Roman rule. The new-style Owls are markedly different from the Owls of Periclean Athens or the "eye in profile" Athena head of the Fourth Century. They were struck on thinner, broad flans, typical of the Hellenistic period, with a portrait of Athena that reflected the heroic portraiture of the period. The owl now stands on an amphora, surrounded by magistrates' names and symbols, all within an olive wreath. The amphora is marked with a letter that may indicate the month of production. Letters below the amphora may indicate the source of the silver used in production.

Circ. B.C. 166 to time of Augustus.

Head of Athena Parthenos in Attic helmet with triple crest, adorned in front with the foreparts of horses, in the side with a griffin or Pegasos, and on the back with a scroll; border of dots. [BMC Attica, Pls. VIII-XIII.] Owl standing on Panathenaic amphora; in the field, two monograms, or two or three magistrates' names, and usually an adjunct symbol; on the amphora, usually, a numeral (Α-Μ, or sometimes Ν) and, as a rule, two or more letters beneath the amphora; the whole in olive-wreath.

No one who compares the thick and irregularly struck coins of the 'old style', which survived at least down to the Macedonian conquest (B.C. 322), with the thinner money of the 'new style' (cf. BMC Attica, Pls. V and VIII) can fail to see at a glance that a considerable time must have elapsed between the two issues. During this interval, which includes the period of Macedonian supremacy, there were very few autonomous coins struck at Athens (see above, p. 375). Whether any considerable number of regal coins of Macedonian types were minted there, is doubtful. The Τετραχμα Αντιγονεια of Antigonus Gonatas, with the 'kalathos' as a distinctive Athenian mint-mark (Babelon, Traité, i. 485), are the only regal coins which can be positively attributed to Athens.1

About B.C. 229 Athens entered into friendly relations with Rome, and shortly afterwards a foedus aequum between the two cities was arranged (Tac. Ann. ii. 53). In these circumstances Athens may, in all likelihood, have been in a position to reorganize her mint, and from the produce of her silver mines to issue from time to time silver tetradrachms equivalent in weight and intrinsic value to those of the successors of Alexander.

When Athens, about this time, began once more to coin money in her own name, she adhered to the types of her old coins, so far as to place the head of Athena on the obverse and the owl on the reverse, but the difference in the mode of treatment of these types was very great.

The head of Athena on the new tetradrachms was certainly suggested by that of the colossal chryselephantine statue by Pheidias in the Parthenon, described by Pausanias (i. 24. 5) as having on each side of the helmet a griffin, and in the midst a sphinx. On the coins the griffin is frequently replaced by a flying Pegasos; the sphinx does not appear, but in its place, the fore-parts of four or more horses, which Pausanias omits to mention, but which must have been a leading feature in the model which the die-engraver had in his mind.

On the reverse other modifications of the old type attract our notice. The intimate connection of the coinage with the Panathenaic Festivals is further emphasized by the addition of the Panathenaic amphora beneath the owl, in place of the waning moon of similar, though less obvious, import; and the little olive-spray in the corner of the incuse square on the older coins is replaced by a complete wreath of olive enclosing 1

Specimens of these coins appear among the offerings in the Asklepieion between the years B.C. 261 and 253 (see supra, p. 232).

Across the field of the new coins are the names of the two annual magistrates (at first in monogram form), accompanied by a subsidiary type or adjunct symbol, chosen by the magistrate whose name stands first (Macdonald, Coin Types, p. 54). To these two magistrates; names there is added during the greater part of the second century (and rarely after circ. B.C. 100) the name of a third magistrate, which is frequently changed, in some series as many as twelve times, in the course of the period during which the other two principal magistrates hold office. That this period is a year is proved by the numeral letters that are placed on the amphora beneath the owl. It has been conclusively shown (N. C., 1899, p. 288) that these indicate the month of the ordinary or lunar year in which the coins were struck. It is not, however, to be supposed that coins were minted with undeviating regularity year by year, or even month by month, in the years when they were issued. The supply was regulated by the demand. It was only during years of considerable activity that issues bearing all the month numerals Α-Μ (or even Ν in intercalary years, when there were thirteen lunar months) took place.

Various plausible arguments have been adduced in favor of the identification of the two annual magistrates with the occupants of important offices, e.g. the στρατηγος επι τα οπλα (strategos epi ta opla, generals for the Arms) or the στρατηγος επι την παρασκευην (strategos epi ten paraskeyen, generals for the preparation) (Reinach, Rev. dev. Etudes gr., i. 163); but these arguments have been effectively disposed of by Preuner (Rh. Mus., xlix. 396) and Kirchner (Z. f. N., 1898, 74), who have shown that the officers in question were not the chief magistrates of the state, but usually members of influential families, sometimes foreign princes, and very often closely related members of one and the same family, such as father and son, or two brothers. The names of some of these same individuals are also met with previously in more dignified offices, such as the archonship, while on the other hand they must occasionally have been under thirty, the minimum age for the holder of a regular αρχη (arci, government authority) at Athens (Sundwall, Undersuchungen, etc., p. 108).

At Rome the magistrates responsible for the coinage formed a triumvirate (Triumviri Monatales). At Athens they were, for circa. B.C. 229, a duumvirate; but the responsibility of these annual duumviri would seem to have been shared, during the greater part of the second century, but a third official, whose name appears beneath those of his two annually appointed colleagues.

Sundwall, after an exhaustive examination of the available evidence, concludes that the duumviri at Athens were not magistrates in the strict sense of the term; their office was an honorary επιμελεια (epimeleia, magistrate) and carried with it a λειτουργια (leitourgia) (op. cit., p. 108). he has also given good reasons for supposing that there was an intimate association between the Athenian mint and the Areopagus. It seems probable that, on the later coins, one of the two επιμεληται (epimeletai, magistrates) always an ex-archon (op. cit., p. 106). Moreover, this arrangement would appear to have superseded an even stricter system of control, to which the presence of a third official's name bears witness. A scrutiny of the names that actually occur suggests that during the greater part of the second century a committee of twelve Areopagites was annually appointed and specially entrusted with a more direct responsibility for the purity, etc., of the coins, the members of this committee holding office in rotation; whenever a fresh issue of coins was required the signature of the committee-man whose turn it was to take duty was added beneath that of the ordinary επιμελητει (op. cit., p. 69). The signature of this third official has also an important bearing on an interesting problem of Athenian chronology. That there was a close correspondence between it and the numeral letter on the amphora had long been noted; but the frequent differences remained unexplained until MacDonald (N. C., 1899, p. 317) suggested that they were to be connected with the double system of time reckoning, which we know from inscriptions to have been in vogue at Athens during a considerable part of the second century B.C. (G. F. Unger, Die attischen Doppeldata in Hermes, xiv. p. 593). He inferred that, while the amphora letter denoted the lunar month, the period of office of the third magistrate was reckoned κατα θεον, or in terms of the solar year, and that consequently we have in the coins of the new Style, as now interpreted, the most extensive, though not, of course, the most detailed, series of documents in which the double dates can be recognized'. Sundwall, while confirming this inference, has made it the starting-point for a careful investigation, as the result of which he has been able to determine, by a comparison with the astronomical testimony, the precise dates of several of the series. Incidentally, the numismatic evidence suggests that epigraphists have ante-dated by one year the list of Athenian archons (op. cit., p. 73).

The minute precautions which seem to have been taken to differentiate the issues of silver coins at the Athenian mint are further exemplified by the addition, beneath the amphora, of various initial letters of doubtful import; thought by some to stand for the names of the various officinae of the mint. But they are more probably, as Svoronos has suggested, the names of the various silver mines in Laurium from which the metal was procured. If these initials are to be interpreted in the latter sense, it would appear that some half-dozen mines were in almost constant work, while the rest, about twenty in number, were only occasionally resorted to.

    

    

CHRONOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE ATHENIAN COINS OF THE 'NEW STYLE

The following chronology of new style issues below refers to the plates and dies in Margaret Thompson's, The New Style Silver Coinage of Athens, ANSNS 10, (1961).  Dates have been corrected to reflect the most recent scholarship. 

PDF Plates Online

PDF Plates Online Alternate

 Magistrates

 Symbols

 Dates (Corr.) 

 Plates 

 Obverse Die #s 

 
 No symbol
 165 - 163 B.C.
 1  1 - 3
 
 Kerchnos or bakchos
 163/2 B.C. 1 4 - 7
  
 No symbol
 162/1 B.C.
 2 8 - 10
 
 No symbol or cornucopia
 161/0 B.C.
 2 11 - 14
 
 Two palms
 160/1 B.C.
 2 15 - 18
 
 Club 159/8 B.C.
 3
 19 - 25
 
 Rudder 158/7 B.C.
 4 26 - 30
 
 Nike 157/6 B.C.
 5
 31 - 36
 
 Trophy 156/5 B.C.
 5 - 6
 37 - 49
 
 Grain-ear 155/4 B.C.
 7 50 - 55
 
 Caps of the Dioscuri
 154/3 B.C.
 8 56 - 64
   Cicada 153/2 B.C.
 9 65 - 73
  Serpents 152/1 B.C.
 10 74 - 85
 
 Term of Hermes
 150/49 B.C.
 11 86 - 93
 ΑΜΜΩ − ∆ΙΟ Kerchnos 148/7 B.C.
 12 94 - 101
 
 Palm behind owl
 149/8 B.C. 13 101 - 110
 ΑΜΜΩ − ∆ΙΟ Cornucopia 148/7 B.C.
 14 111 - 120
 Α∆ΕΙ − ΗΛΙΟ Trident 147/6 B.C.
 15 121 - 128
 ΧΑΡΙ − ΗΡΑ Cock with palm
 146/5 B.C.
 16 129 - 137
 Grain-ear drachms - 165 - 42 B.C.
 17 138 - 157
 
 Forepart of Horse
 145/4 B.C.
 18 158 - 169
 
 Filleted thyrsos
 144/3 B.C. 19 - 20 169 - 183
 ∆ΙΟΦΑ − ∆ΙΟ∆Ο
 Apollo 143/2 B.C. 20 - 21 184 - 201
 ∆ΗΜΗ − ΙΕΡΩ
 Helmet 142/1 B.C. 22 - 23 202 - 213
 
 Eagle 141/0 B.C.
 24 - 25
 214 - 246
 
 Apluster 140/39 B.C.
 26 - 27
 247 - 265
 ΚΤΗΣΙ − ΕΥΜΑ
 Nike 139/8 B.C.
 28 - 29
 266 - 286
 ΓΛΑΥ − ΕΧΕ
 Helios bust
 138/7 B.C.
 30 - 31
 287 - 314
 ΜΙΚΙ − ΘΕΟΦΡΑ
 Nike in quadriga
 137/6 B.C.
 32 - 33
 315 - 324
 ΗΡΑ − ΑΡΙΣΤΟΦ
 Club, lion's skin, bow in case
 136/5 B.C.
 32 - 34
 324 - 346
 ΜΕΝΕ∆ − ΕΠΙΓΕΝΟ
 Asklepios 135/4 B.C.
 35 347 - 359
 ΤΙΜΑΡΧΟΥ − ΝΙΚΑΓΟ
 Anchor and star
 134/3 B.C.
 36 - 37
 360 - 375
 ΠΟΛΥΧΑΡΜ − ΝΙΚΟΓ
 Winged caduceus
 133/2 B.C.
 38 368 - 382
 ∆ΩΡΟΘΕ − ∆ΙΟΦ
 Forepart of Lion
 132/1 B.C.
 39 383 - 395
 ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΣ − ΝΙΚΟΓΚΑΡΑΙΧΟΣ
 Elephant 131/30 B.C.
 40 396 - 403
 ΘΕΟΦΡΑ − ΣΩΤΑΣ
 Winged fulmen
 130/29 B.C.
 41 401 - 412
 ∆ΙΟΓΕ − ΠΟΣΕΙ
 Dionysos 129/8 B.C.
 42 413 - 420
 ΑΧΑΙΟΣ − ΗΛΙ
 Cornucopia with grain
 128/7 B.C.
 43 421 - 428
 ΛΥΣΑΝ − ΓΛΑΥΚΟΣ
 Cicada 127/6 B.C.
 44 429 -440
 ΕΠΙΓΕΝΗ −  ΣΩΣΑΝ∆ΡΟΣ
 Eagle on fulmen
 126/5 B.C. 45 - 46
 441 - 474
 ΠΟΛΕΜΩΝ − ΑΛΚΕΤΗΣ
 Tripod 125/4 B.C. 47 - 48
 475 - 483
 ΜΙΚΙΩΝ −  ΕΥΡΥΚΛΕΙ Dioscuri 124/3 B.C. 48 - 49
 484 - 493
 ΑΦΡΟ∆ΙΣΙ − ΑΠΟΛΗΞΙ
 Nike 123/2 B.C. 50 494 - 506
 ΕΥΡΥΚΛΕΙ − ΑΡΙΑΡΑ Three Graces
 122/1 B.C. 51 - 52
 503 - 523
 ΚΑΡΑΙΧ − ΕΡΓΟΚΛΕ
 Prow 121/0 B.C. 53 - 54
 524 - 542
 ΑΦΡΟ∆ΙΣΙ − ∆ΙΟΓΕ
 Double cornucopia with fillet
 120/19 B.C. 55 - 56
 543 - 555
  ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΙ − ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΙ
 Helios in quadriga
 119/8 B.C. 57 - 59
 553 - 579
 ΑΜΜΩΝΙΟΣ −  ΚΑΛΛΙΑΣ
 Two torches
 118/7 B.C. 60 - 61
 577 - 595
 ΘΕΜΙΣΤΟ − ΘΕΟΠΟΜΠΟΣ
 Trophy on prow
 117/6 B.C. 62 - 63
 596 - 610
 ΣΩΚΡΑΤΗΣ − ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΟ∆Ω
 Apollo Delios
 116/5 B.C. 64 - 65
 611 - 628
 ΜΗΤΡΟ∆ΩΡΟΣ − ΜΙΛΤΙΑ∆ΗΣ ∆ΗΜΟΣΘΕΝ
 Grapes
 115/4 B.C. 66 - 67
 629 - 647
 ∆ΙΟΤΙΜΟΣ − ΜΑΓΑΣ
 No symbol
 114/3 B.C. 68 - 69
 648 - 668
 ΕΥΜΑΡΕΙ∆ΗΣ − ΑΛΚΙ∆ΑΜ ΚΛΕΟΜΕΝ
 Triptolemos 113/2 B.C. 70 - 71
 669 - 685
 XΑΡΙΝΑΥΤΗΣ − ΑΡΙΣΤΕΑΣ
 Demeter with torches
 112/1 B.C. 72 - 73
 686 - 696
 ΦΑΝΟΚΛΗΣ − ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΟΣ
 Artemis with torch
 111/0 B.C. 74 - 75
 697 - 709
 ΕΥΒΟΥΛΙ∆ΗΣ − ΑΓΑΘΟΚΛΗ
 Artemis with fawn
 110/09 B.C. 76
 710 - 713
 ΖΩΙΛΟΣ − ΕΥΑΝ∆ΡΟΣ
 Bee 110/09 B.C. 76 - 77
 713 - 722
 ∆ΑΜΩΝ − ΣΩΣΙΚΡΑΤΗΣ
 Quiver and bow
 109/08 B.C. 76 - 77
 719 - 734
 ΕΥΜΗΛΟΣ − ΚΑΛΛΙΦΩΝ
 Tyche
 108/7 B.C.
 80 - 81
 729 - 748
 ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙ∆ΗΣ − ΕΥΚΛΗΣ
 Winged Tyche with amphora 107/6 B.C.
 82 745 - 748
 ΘΕΟ∆ΟΤΟΣ − ΚΛΕΟΦΑΝΗΣ
 No symbol
 106/5 B.C.
 83 - 84
 759 - 776
 ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙ∆ΗΣ − ΕΥΚΛΗΣ
 Winged Tyche with amphora 105/4 B.C.
 85 - 87
 777 - 800
 ΑΝ∆ΡΕΑΣ − ΧΑΡΙΝΑΥΤΗΣ
 Dionysos and Demeter
 104/3 B.C.
 88 - 89
 797 - 811
 ΙΚΕΣΙΟΣ − ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΑ∆ΗΣ
 Wreath 103/2 B.C.
 90
 812 - 822
 ΤΙΜΟΣΤΡΑΤΟΣ − ΠΟΣΗΣ
 Dionysos with mask
 102/1 B.C.
 91 - 92
 823 - 839
 ΑΜΦΙΚΡΑΤΗΣ − ΕΠΙΣΤΡΑΤΟΣ
 Ears of grain
 101/0 B.C.
 93 - 94
 833 - 853
 ∆ΩΣΙΘΕΟΣ − ΧΑΡΙΑΣ
 Tyche 100/99 B.C.
 95 - 97
 850 - 878
 ∆ΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΣ − ΑΓΑΘΙΠΠΟΣ
 Caps of the Dioscuri
 99/8 B.C.
 98  - 102
 879 - 928
 ΝΙΚΗΤΗΣ − ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΣ
 Gorgon-head 98/7 B.C.
 103 - 105
 929 - 962
 ΑΠΡΙΣΤΙΩΝ − ΦΙΛΩΝ
 Pegasus 97/6 B.C.
 106 - 108
 960 - 989
 ΑΡΟΠΟΣ − ΜΝΑΣΑΓΟ
 Winged Agon
 96/5 B.C.
 109 - 111
 990 - 1015
 ΞΕΝΟΚΛΗΣ − ΑΡΜΟΞΕΝΟΣ
 Coiled serpent
 95/4 B.C.
 112 - 113
 1014 - 1031
 ΝΙΚΟΓΕΝΗΣ − ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΧΟΣ
 Hermes or no symbol 94/3 B.C. 114 - 115 1032 - 1049
 ∆ΗΜΕΑΣ − ΕΡΜΟΚΛΗΣ
 Headdress of Isis 93/2 B.C. 116 - 117 1050 - 1066
 ΞΕΝΟΚΛΗΣ − ΑΡΜΟΞΕΝΟΣ
 Dolphin and trident
 92/1 B.C.
 118 - 121
 1066 - 1109
 ΞΕΝΟΚΛΗΣ − ΑΡΜΟΞΕΝΟΣ Roma 90/89 B.C.
 122 - 123
 1110 - 1124
 ΚΟΙΝΤΟΣ − ΚΛΕΑΣ
 Roma and Nike
 89/8 B.C.
 124 1122 - 1130
 ΑΠΕΛΛΙΚΩΝ − ΓΟΡΓΙΑΣ
 Griffin 88/7 B.C.
 125 - 126
 1130 - 1140
 ΒΑΣΙΛΕ ΜΙΘΡΑ∆ΑΤΗΣ − ΑΡΙΣΤΙΩΝ
 Star between crescents
 87/6 B.C.
 127 1143 - 1146
 ΜΝΑΣΕΑΣ − ΝΕΣΤΩΡ
 Kerchnos 91/0 B.C.
 128 1147 - 1157
 ΚΛΕΟΦΑΝΗΣ − ΕΠΙΘΕΤΗΣ
 Baitulos with fillet
 85/4 B.C.
 129 1158 - 1164
 ΜΕΝΤΩΡ − ΜΟΣΧΙΟΝ
 Harmodios and Aristogeiton
 84/3 B.C.
 130 1165 - 1172
 ΑΡΧΙΤΙΜΟΣ − ∆ΗΜΗΤΡΙ
 Isis 83/2 B.C.
 131 1169 - 1178
 ΛΥΣΑΝ∆ΡΟΣ − ΟΙΝΟΦΙΛΟΣ
 Poppy-head and grain-ears
 82/1 B.C.
 132 1179 - 1186
 ΑΜΦΙΑΣ − ΟΙΝΟΦΙΛΟΣ
 Demeter 81/0 B.C.
 133 1187 - 1195
 ΕΥΜΗΛΟΣ − ΘΕΟΞΕΝΙ∆ΗΣ
 Ares(?) 80/79 B.C.
 134 1196 - 1204
 ΝΕΣΤΩΡ − ΜΝΑΣΕΑΣ
 Stag 79/8 B.C.
 135 - 136
 1205 - 1221
 ΣΩΤΑ∆ΗΣ − ΘΕΜΙΣΤΟΚΛΗΣ
 Branch 78/7 B.C.
 137 1222 - 1226
 ΛΕΥΚΙΟΣ − ΑΝΤΙΚΡΑΤΗΣ Demeter and Artemis
 77 - 45/40 B.C.
 137 1227
 ΠΑΝΤΑΚΛΗΣ − ∆ΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΣ Herakles 77 - 45/40 B.C. 137 1228 - 1229
 ΘΕΟΦΡΑΣΤΟΣ − ΘΕΜΙΣΤΟ Looped fillet (diadem)
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 138 1230
 ∆ΙΟΦΑΝΤΟΣ − ΑΙΣΧΙΝΗΣ Sphinx 77 - 45/40 B.C. 138 1231
 ∆ΗΜΕΑΣ − ΚΑΛΛΙΚΡΑΤΙ∆ΗΣ
 Isis 77 - 45/40 B.C. 138 1232 - 1233
 ΑΛΚΕΤΗΣ − ΕΥΑΓΙΩΝ
 Helmet 77 - 45/40 B.C. 138 1234-1235
 ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΣ − ΜΝΑΣΑΓΟΡΑΣ
 Dionysos 77 - 45/40 B.C. 138 1236
 ΕΠΙΓΕΝΗΣ − ΞΕΝΩΝ
 Apollo Lykeios
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 139 1237 - 1240
 ΜΕΝΕ∆ΗΜΟΣ − ΤΙΜΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ
 Demeter 77 - 45/40 B.C.
 139 1241 - 1244
 ΜΕΝΝΕΑΣ − ΗΡΩ∆ΗΣ
 Hekate 77 - 45/40 B.C. 139 1245
 ∆ΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΣ − ∆ΗΜΟΣΤΡΑΤΟΣ
 Winged caduceus
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 139 1246 - 1247
 ∆ΗΜΟΞΑΡΗΣ − ΠΑΜΜΕΝΗΣ
 Cicada 77 - 45/40 B.C. 139 1248
 ∆ΙΟΚΛΗΣ ΛΕΩΝΙ∆ΗΣ
 Asklepios 77 - 45/40 B.C. 140 1249 - 1250
 ΦΙΛΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ − ΗΡΩ∆ΗΣ
 Dionysos 77 - 45/40 B.C. 140 1251 - 1252
 ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΞΟΣ − ΕΠΙΚΡΑΤΗΣ
 Triptolemos 77 - 45/40 B.C. 140 1253 - 1254
 ΑΡΞΙΤΙΜΟΣ − ΠΑΜΜΕΝΗΣ
 Filleted thyrsos
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 140 1255 - 1258
 ∆ΙΟΚΛΗΣ ΤΟ ∆ΕΥ − ΜΗ∆ΕΙΟΣ
 Hygieia 77 - 45/40 B.C. 141 1259 - 1262
 ΑΠΕΛΛΙΚΩΝ − ΑΡΙΣΤΟΤΕΛΗΣ
 Demeter 77 - 45/40 B.C. 141 1263
 ΗΡΑΚΛΩΝ − ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙ∆ΗΣ
 Head of eagle
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 141 1264
 ΦΙΛΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ − ΚΑΛΛΙΦΩΝ
 Nike 77 - 45/40 B.C. 141 1265 - 1267
 ΤΡΥΦΩΝ − ΠΟΛΥΧΑΡΜΟΣ
 Hekate 77 - 45/40 B.C. 142 1268
 ΤΟ ΤΡΙ ∆ΙΟΚΛΗΣ − ∆ΙΟ∆ΩΡΟΣ
 Dionysos 77 - 45/40 B.C. 142 1269 - 1270
 ∆ΙΟΚΛΗΣ ΜΕΛΙ − ΜΗ∆ΕΙΟΣ
 Athena Parthenos
 77 - 45/40 B.C. 142 1271
 Sulla I
  86 - 84 B.C. 143 - 146
 1273 - 1312
 Sulla II

 86 - 84 B.C. 147 - 149
 1313 - 1340
 Sulla III
  86 - 84 B.C. 149 1341
 Imitations

 185 - 40 B.C.
 150 1346 - 1433


All coins are guaranteed for eternity