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Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.

Vespasian coins for sale in the Forum Ancient Coins shop

After a relatively successful campaign in Judaea (which he left to his son Titus to finish), Flavius Vespasianus was declared emperor by his troops at Alexandria in 69 A.D. Upon the defeat of Vitellius by the Danubian legions, Vespasian went to Rome and consolidated his power. Vespasian was popular, being both down to earth and possessed of great wit. He was responsible for the economic and military recovery of Rome, and is justly regarded as one of the greatest Roman emperors.

Vespasian was the father of Titus and Domitian.

Also see: ERIC - VESPASIAN

References

Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Butcher, Kevin. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC - AD 253. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication 34. (London, 2004).
Calicó, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Carradice, I.A. & T.V. Buttrey. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II, Part 1: From AD 69 to 96. (London, 2007).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l’Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Davis, Philip. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, Jean-Baptiste. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. a Nerva. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 5th Edition. (Amphora, 2010).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 2: Vespasian to Domitian. (London, 1930).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).

Obverse legends

CAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
DIVVSAVGVSTVSVESPASIANVS
DIVOAVGVESPSPQR
DIVOVESPASIANO
IMPCAESARAVGVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSII
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGCOSIIITRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASAVGCOSVTRPPP
IMPCAESARVESPASIAN IMPCAESARVESPASIANVS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSTRP
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESARVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESARVESPAVG
IMPCAESARVESPAVGCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPAVGVST
IMPCAESVESPASAVG
IMPCAESVESPASAVGPMTRPPPCSIII
IMPCAESVESPASAVGTRPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGCOSVIIIPP
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPASIANAVGPMTRPPPCOSVCENS
IMPCAESARVESPASCOSIIICENS
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
IMPCAESARVESPASIANVSAVGPMTPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSIIIICEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMCOSVCEN
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTPCOSIIIICENS
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPPPCOSIII
IMPCAESVESPAVGPMTRPIIIIPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASAVGPMTRIPPPCOSIIII
IMPVESPASIANAVG
IMPVESPAVG
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIPP
IMPVESPCAESAVGPONTMAXTRIBPOTCOSIIIIPP
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPTRPCOSII

Average well preserved denarius weight 3.30 grams.


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DICTIONARY OF ROMAN COINS







Please add updates or make corrections to the NumisWiki text version as appropriate.
Vespasianus (Flavius), Roman emperor from AD 70-79, was born in the country of the Sabines AD 9, his father being Flavius Sabinus, a man of low extraction, and his mother Vespasia Polla, the daughter of a Praefectus Castorum.

During the reign of Claudius he was employed in a military capacity in Germany and in the Isle of Wight, and under Nero he was made proconsul of Africa; and when the Jewish war broke out in AD 66 he was sent by Nero to the east. He continued the Jewish war during the struggles between Galba, Otho and Vitellius, and towards the end of AD 69, on the death of Otho, he was proclaimed emperor at Alexandria, in Judea, and soon after (AD 70), on the death of Vitellius, at Rome. In AD 71 his son Titus, who had left to prosecute the Jewish war, returned to Rome, taking with him the spoils from the temple at Jerusalem, and celebrated with his father a triumph. The temple of Janus was closed, and Vespasian rebuilt the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, which had been burnt during the troubles under Vitellius. The temple is represented on coins. In AD 72, owing to information received by Vespasian that Antiochus king of Commagene and his son Epiphanes were in treaty with the Parthian King, Commagene was occupied by Paetus, governor of Syria, and made a Roman province. The murder of Sabinus and his faithful wife Epponina leaves a stain upon the memory of Vespasian. He died AD 79 at the age of 69, having reigned nearly 10 years. His wife Domitilla and her daughter Domitilla died before he came to the throne, but his two sons, Titus and Domitian succeeded him in turn.

Vespasian was consul 9 times, imperator 20 times, and received the Tribunitia Potestas ten times.

 

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