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SRCV

Sear, David R. Roman Coins and Their Values. (London, 1978 - )

4th Edition. One volume.

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values. (London, 1984-2014).

5th Edition. 5 volumes.

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume I: Republic to the Flavians. (London, 2000).

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume II: Nerva to Severus Alexander. (London, 2002).

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume III: Maximinus I to Carinus. (London, 2005).

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume IV: Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).

Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume V: The Christian Empire: The Later Constantinian Dynasty and the Houses of Valentinian and Theodosius and Their Successors, Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).

Roman Coins and Their Values. 4th Revised Edition

ROMAN COINS AND Their VALUES, 1988 edition, by David Sear

The only one-volume priced guide to the coinage of Republican and Imperial Rome. The original edition of Sear's Roman Coins and Their Values was published by Seaby thirty-six years ago and has been through three revisions (1970, 1974, and 1981). This edition is a reprint of the 1988 Seaby's version.   It is an indispensable listing of all major types of gold, silver and bronze, issued over some seven hundred and fifty years by the greatest militaristic state the world has ever known. Over 4,300 coins are included with detailed description and valuations and all major and minor personalities are listed by means of their portrait coins. This fourth revised edition takes notice under the Republic of recent work in the field, especially that of Professor Michael Crawford. In the Imperial period, essential new references that have appeared since the previous edition are all incorporated, for example Dr. J. P. C. Kent's magisterial volume Roman Imperial Coinage VIII, and the late Dr. C. H. V. Sutherland's extensive revision of Roman Imperial Coinage I. The introductory material on denominations, reverse types, mints, mintmarks and dating presents a useful background, as do the succinct biographical details that precede the listing of coins issued by emperors and members of the imperial family. Previous editions have been acknowledged by collectors, Roman historians and scholars alike as the most useful single volume reference work in the field. With 12 plates, over 900 photos in the text and a map.
BKBSRCV.  Roman Coins and Their Values. 4th Revised Edition by David R. Sear, 1988 edition (reprint), 388 pages, 12 plates, valuations in £, hardback; $65.00




ROMAN COINS AND Their VALUES, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 96 by David Sear

The original edition of Sear's Roman Coins and Their Values was published by Seaby thirty-six years ago and has been through four revisions (1970, 1974, 1981 and 1988). However, the publication of the Millennium Edition of this popular work makes a radical departure from previous editions. The catalogue entries have been expanded to include a virtually complete listing of the entire Roman Republican series, as well as more comprehensive coverage of the much larger and more complex Imperial series. Greater emphasis is now placed on the precise chronology and place of mintage of each type and extensive coverage is given to the important series of billon and bronze coins struck at Alexandria over a period of more than 300 years. The valuations have been exhaustively researched from recent auction records and fixed price catalogues and many professional numismatists have contributed their valuable opinions on specific series. Prices (both in British pounds and US dollars) are now expressed in either two or three grades of preservation for each entry, usually VF and EF for precious metal issues, and F, VF and EF for Imperial Bronzes. Perhaps most importantly for the collector, the number of photographic illustrations in the text has been increased, and their quality improved. Expansion on this scale has inevitably led to a need to divide the work into more than one volume, but collectors and dealers will now find it of much greater value both as a source of information and as a comprehensive work of reference for this vast and complex series.
BKBSME1.  Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol I by David R. Sear, Millennium Edition, 532 pages, more than 1,200 illustrations, valuations in £ and US$, hardback; $90.00




ROMAN COINS AND Their VALUES, Volume Two, The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the
Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235 by David Sear

Volume II extends coverage of the Imperial series from Nerva, the thirteenth Caesar and first of the Adoptive emperors, down to the overthrow of the Severan dynasty in 235. It encompasses what may justifiably be termed the golden age of the Roman imperial coinage. The full development of the Augustan system of coin denomination and perfection of the method by which government propaganda was communicated to the citizenry through the medium of coinage both reached their peak during these fourteen decades. The preceding coinages of the Julio-Claudian and Flavians periods had seen much experimentation with the currency system and tentative early steps in the development of the propaganda potential of the reverse types. The coinages of the Adoptive emperors and those of the Antonine and Severan dynasties saw the ultimate fulfillment of this process resulting in a coinage of unprecedented volume and complexity. The number of types included in the listings shows a dramatic increase and the proportion of illustrated coins is much greater than before. Throughout the catalogue the current market valuations have been expressed in two currencies (pound sterling and US dollars) and in at least two grades of preservation - usually VF and EF for precious metal coins, and F and VF for the billon and bronze issues of Roman Egypt. For regular aes denominations (sestertii, dupondi, asses, etc.) valuations in three grades (F, VF and EF) have normally been provided. Another feature not present in earlier editions is the inclusion of the mint and precise date of each type. The biographical sketches at the commencement of each reign and under certain subsidiary headings have been  revised.
BKBSME2.  Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume Two by David R. SEAR, 696 pages, illustrations throughout, valuations in £ and US$ in at least two grades of preservation, hardback, laminated jacket; $130.00





ROMAN COINS AND THEIR VALUES, Volume Three, The Accession of Maximus to the Death of Carinus AD235 - AD 285 by David Sear
The third volume of the fully revised and expanded general catalogue of Roman coins extends coverage of the Imperial series from the accession of Maximinus I in AD 235 down to the assassination of Carinus and the accession of Diocletian half a century later.
BKBSME3.  Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume Three by David R. SEAR, The Third Century Crisis and Recovery, A.D. 235-285 (The Accession of Maximus to the Death of Carinus), illustrations throughout, valuations in £ and US$ in at least two grades of preservation, hardback, laminated jacket; $85.00