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Nigrinianus




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NIGRINIANVS. - This name accompanied by a youthful radiated head, appears on certain gold coins of teh greatest degree of rarity, and on third brass also of great rarity - coupled with the appellation of DIVVS.; and on the reverse is CONSECRATIO.  The type of the gold is a funeral pile with a bigga placed on the summit.  The type of the third brass, (which are sometimes found washed with gold or with silver) is an eagle having its wings expanded.  The annexed portrait is from a brass coin in the British Museum.

History makes no mention of this Nigrinianus, who is known only by the coins above alluded to. - Tristan supposes him to have been the son of the tyrant Alexander, who reigned in Africa during the time of Maxentius. - Beauvais and other subsequent writers, on the other hand, furnish more conclusive reasons for giving Carinus for his father and with much probability Arria Nigrina for his mother. - It would further appear that this prince died in his early youth, and that Carinus, after the example of Domitian, ambitiously gave Nigrinianus the honours of the apotheosis. - Both Eckhel and Mionnet quote the gold coin from the museum of Saxe Gotha.


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Nigrinianus




Please |help| us convert the |Dictionary of Roman Coins| from scans to text by typing the original text here. Please add updates or make corrections to the NumisWiki text version as appropriate.


NIGRINIANVS. - This name accompanied by a youthful radiated head, appears on certain gold coins of teh greatest degree of rarity, and on third brass also of great rarity - coupled with the appellation of DIVVS.; and on the reverse is CONSECRATIO.  The type of the gold is a funeral pile with a bigga placed on the summit.  The type of the third brass, (which are sometimes found washed with gold or with silver) is an eagle having its wings expanded.  The annexed portrait is from a brass coin in the British Museum.

History makes no mention of this Nigrinianus, who is known only by the coins above alluded to. - Tristan supposes him to have been the son of the tyrant Alexander, who reigned in Africa during the time of Maxentius. - Beauvais and other subsequent writers, on the other hand, furnish more conclusive reasons for giving Carinus for his father and with much probability Arria Nigrina for his mother. - It would further appear that this prince died in his early youth, and that Carinus, after the example of Domitian, ambitiously gave Nigrinianus the honours of the apotheosis. - Both Eckhel and Mionnet quote the gold coin from the museum of Saxe Gotha.


View whole page from the |Dictionary Of Roman Coins|